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Hilda Bernstein (1915–2006)

Author of The World That Was Ours

Includes the names: Hilda Bernstein

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Disambiguation Notice

"For Their Triumphs and for Their Tears: Women in Apartheid South Africa" (3rd, revised & enlarged edition, 1985) is significantly different from "For Their Triumphs and for Their Tears: Conditions and Resistance of Women in Apartheid South Africa" (1st edition, 1975). The 2nd, revised edition is dated 1978.

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Short biography
Hilda Bernstein, née Schwarz, was born in London to a Russian Jewish immigrant family. She left school as a young teenager to work and at age 18 went with her mother to South Africa. There she became active in politics and joined the Communist Party. In 1941, she married fellow activist Lionel "Rusty" Bernstein, an architect with whom she had four children. Together the couple played prominent roles in the struggle to end apartheid in their country. She also became an important women's rights advocate and founded the non-racial Federation of South African Women. In 1943, she was elected to the Johannesburg City Council. Her writings appeared regularly in periodicals in South Africa and other nations in Africa and Europe. The Bernsteins fled to Botswana in 1964 when government authorities sought to arrest her for treason. She later described the ordeal in her autobiography The World that was Ours (1967). They spent many years in exile in the UK, where she further established herself as a writer, graphic artist, and speaker. Her novel Death Is Part of the Process (1983) was adapted for BBC television. In 1994, she and her husband visited South Africa uring the election in which their fellow activist Nelson Mandela was elected President. In 2003, after her husband's death, she returned to live permanently in a suburb of Cape Town.
Disambiguation notice
"For Their Triumphs and for Their Tears: Women in Apartheid South Africa" (3rd, revised & enlarged edition, 1985) is significantly different from "For Their Triumphs and for Their Tears: Conditions and Resistance of Women in Apartheid South Africa" (1st edition, 1975). The 2nd, revised edition is dated 1978.

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