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Events on LibraryThing Local

Ann Brashares has 10 upcoming events.

Apr
26
Ann Brashares
Blue Willow Bookshop, Saturday, April 26 at 00am
Ann Brashares (3 Willows, Forever in Blue: The Fourth Summer of the Sisterhood, GIRLS IN PANTS, GIRLS IN PANTS: The Third Summer of the Sisterhood, The Second Summer of the Sisterhood, Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, Sisterhood Everlasting (Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants), The Here and Now, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants Complete Collection, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants--3-book boxed set)

“I don’t really write with the idea of trying to teach any lessons. I want to tell a story as truthfully and engagingly as I can, and then let the chips fall where they may.”—Ann Brashares Ann Brashares grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland, with three brothers and attended a Quaker school in the D.C. area called Sidwell Friends. She studied Philosophy at Barnard College, part of Columbia University in New York City. Expecting to continue studying philosophy in graduate school, Ann took a year off after college to work as an editor, hoping to save money for school. Loving her job, she never went to graduate school, and instead, remained in New York City and worked as an editor for many years. Ann made the transition from editor to full-time writer to write her first novel, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants.ABOUT THE AUTHORAnn Brashares ON The Second Summer of the SisterhoodThe Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, your debut novel, received much critical praise, awards, and adoration from readers of all ages. What are your thoughts on its success and why do you think it resonated so heavily with readers? Its success has been a wonderful surprise each step of the way. From the outset I tried to keep my expectations very low. I know how hard it is to get a book published let alone have it succeed. I’ve read many excellent books that did not succeed commercially. Here I give credit to the publisher, Random House, and to the booksellers. They supported the book wholeheartedly. To the extent that it has resonated with readers, I am grateful for it. I sense that they have responded, more than anything else, to the unconditional love and loyalty that the Sisterhood represents. Has the success changed your writing process and expectations for the The Second Summer of the Sisterhood? I tried not to let the success change anything, but it kept creeping into my consciousness anyway. I worried that I wouldn’t live up to the hopes of my readers. I worried that I would forget how to write. I worried that I never knew how to write in the first place. I worried a lot and I wrote very little. When I finally forced myself back to my computer, I worried I had fallen out of touch with my characters. They felt to me like friends with whom I'd been intensely close, but hadn't seen in a long time. It's painful, in a way, to have to ask clunky, anonymous questions of people you used to know in an intimate, hour-by-hour way. Luckily, though, when I started to spend real time with Carmen and Bee and Tibby and Lena, I relaxed. I grew close to them again and enjoyed being with them so much, I forgot all the things I was worrying about. As for expectations, I still try to keep them in check. But I do allow myself to hope. I hope that readers who liked the first book will like the second one, too. Did you plan for the girls’ relationships with their mothers to play a stronger role in The Second Summer of the Sisterhood? Does your relationship with your own mother resemble any from the book?It didn’t start out that way exactly. As I was working out stories for each of the girls, I realized that most of them involved their mothers to some degree. So I just went with it. The mother-daughter bond is about as rich a subject as any I know. And I felt those relationships could give a center of gravity to a book that otherwise ran the risk of going in too many directions at once. My relationship with my mother doesn’t resemble any of the ones in the book precisely. There are some thematic similarities to Carmen, though, in that my parents were divorced and I had to come to terms with my mom having a romantic life of her own. As the mother of three young children, do you find that you relate more to the girls or their mothers? Even though I’m closer to the age of the mothers, I related more to the daughters. I think that’s because I wrote the book from the girls’ points of view. Although I tried really hard to imagine how the mothers would feel, I didn’t actually spend my days thinking their thoughts the way I do when I’ m writing in a character’s point of view. Also, my daughter is not a teenager yet. When she gets to be a teenager, then I’ll really understand what those mothers go through. Female friendship remains a central theme in the second book, do you have your own Sisterhood? In your writing, you seem to have a real understanding of the importance of those bonds, how have you come to know that?I have a few very good old friends from childhood and some more recent friends whom I love dearly. But truthfully, I think the Sisterhood is more fantasy than reality for me. I grew up in a house full of boys (wonderful boys, I should mention), and always dreamed about sisters. Do you have a sense of where the girls will be “next summer”? How do you see their growth continuing? Next summer will be the girls’ last before they split up to go to college. That’s going to be a big deal for them. I suspect Tibby is going to fall in love for the first time. I have a feeling Bridget might encounter Eric, the soccer coach, again. I have a few other plans up my sleeve, but I think I better keep them secret. What do you hope readers will take away from this second book? I don’t really write with the idea of trying to teach any lessons. I want to tell a story as truthfully and engagingly as I can, and then let the chips fall where they may. But I realize when I get to the end of the story, I care very much that my characters evolve and grow. In spite of their torments and their selfish impulses, I care that they are guided by a spirit of goodness. I want them to set a high standard for compassion and for friendship. Ann Brashares ON THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS How did you come up with the book’s unique central concept? Why traveling pants? The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants was born in an unusual way. I was working as an editor at the time, chatting in the office with a colleague and friend who told me about a summer when she and some girl friends shared a pair of pants. She told me the pants had sadly been lost in Borneo. My mind was immediately filled with all sorts of wonderful possibilities. I think pants have unique qualities, especially in a woman’s life. Whatever bodily insecurities we have, we seem to take out on our pants. In high school, my friends would have their skinny pants and their fat pants. I like pants that allow women not to judge their bodies. The Traveling Pants are the kind of pants that always love you. They fit my characters’ bodies in a non-restrictive way. Describe your favorite pair of pants. What makes them your favorite? At the moment, my favorite pair of pants are bright red. They are cropped, slightly flared summer pants. Like a good friend, they are flexible, forgiving, and boost my confidence even on really off days. They are low maintenance pants–never requiring dry cleaning or even ironing. The waistline is zippered and definite, so it doesn't have that subtly defeated quality of elastic. And these pants manage to make me feel loved even through major body transitions (like having a baby!). This story should resonate with young women because sharing clothes is such an integral part of many female friendships. Did you have a clothes-sharing experience that helped to shape the book? The concept of The Pants is directly related to my experience with my wedding dress. Before I had chosen a wedding dress, I had a picture in my mind of what mine would look like. One day, my mom and I were touring wedding venues in the Washington, DC area where I grew up. Our guide showed us some wedding photographs, and one of them showed a bride wearing a dress just like the one I had imagined. The tour guide invited me to take the picture home, so I did, and I left it in my drawer. A few months later, the sister of a friend, a young woman named Hope, asked if I had picked my wedding dress. I hadn't. Hope’s recent wedding hadn’t worked out. She wasn't broken-hearted about the groom, but she was broken-hearted about her beautiful, amazing dress not being worn. She asked me if I would consider wearing it at my wedding. I didn't know Hope very well, so I politely declined a few times. Yet she was strangely insistent and later arrived at our friend's apartment with a huge box. Through the clear plastic front I could see that the dress inside was remarkably familiar. It was exactly the same as the dress in the photograph I had put in my drawer. I was ecstatic. I tried to give the dress back to Hope, after I had worn it in my wedding, but she didn't want it. So I decided, in the spirit of her generosity, that it was a fortuitous, serendipitous kind of dress, and needed to be shared some more. Since then, it has been worn beautifully by my older brother's wife, my middle brother's wife, and my lifelong best friend. These are probably the three women I am closest to in my life–my own sisterhood. I'm hoping it will be worn again. In fact, I am imagining that instead of the next bride throwing the bouquet at the end of the wedding, she can ball up my wedding dress and throw that. Much of the novel takes place in Baja and Greece. Did travel play an influential role in your childhood or teenage years? I love to travel and have taken a lot of trips, but have never actually been to either Baja or Greece. I did a lot of reading and imagining for those stories. They existed more in my imagination than any place else. I love islands. I loved that Oia, the town where Lena’s grandparents lived, was stuck in time and had this geological drama in the background. I grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland, which was very Plain Jane. When I was a kid, I had a scrapbook that I used to write letters in from places I wished I could have gone. I would imagine being in Argentina and then write about all the incredible things I was seeing there. This book is almost like a continuation of those imaginary years. How old were you when you first fell in love? Who was he? Where were you? I first fell in love when I was 14 or 15, but it wasn’t immediate falling in love, it was a slow… slow fall. The person I fell in love with immediately was my husband. He is an artist and we met during my freshman year at Barnard. He sat across from me and drew a picture of me in the Columbia University Philosophy Reading Room. I hadn’t even noticed him, but a friend of mine saw what he was doing and told me. As soon as I went out with him, that was it. It was the first time I felt like I loved someone instantly. We’ve been together ever since. You’ve written about four very different girls. Are the characters in this book based on people you know or wish you had known? Oddly enough, they aren’t. They are composites of different people. I based Lena's story on the Greek myth of Artemis, the proud, boy-hating goddess of the hunt who, when spotted bathing by a suitor, turns the poor guy into a stag. I wanted my Lena to be less pleased with herself, though, and for her suitor to be more formidable. The story of Tibby and Bailey I based on the great, great movie It's a Wonderful Life. Bailey started out more like an angel than a person. I imagined her as an angel who revealed the cynical little prejudices and presumptions that I remember finding so seductive when I was fifteen. Carmen was the girl who said things I could never say and Bridget was the girl who did things I would never do. Who are you most like: Carmen, Tibby, Bridget or Lena? There’s a little bit of me in each of them. I would say I have more in common with Lena and Carmen than the other two. I have some life experience in common with Carmen, but we are considerably different too. I am a little like Carmen in that I sometimes feel as if I lose myself when I'm out of context. Also, I have dealt with issues of divorce and step families. For the protection of the innocent, though, I must say that my own family circumstances were completely different than hers. As for Lena, I guess I know what it is to feel awkward and inward sometimes, and romantically, to feel like a big chicken. Sometimes the girls provided me with an escape or a fantasy. Why did you choose Carmen to set up the story? Carmen struck me as the person who was most conscious–who recognized the importance of the girls’ friendship. She didn’t just live it, she knew it inside and out. I think she’s the most introspective of the four. What do you think are the most important aspects of female relationships? Loyalty and love. And I mean the kind of love that parents have–unconditional. So often, relationships become competitive or marked by pettiness or envy. For relationships to really transcend the negative stuff in life, they need to be without judgement. I wanted to create a story about a rare bunch of girls who didn't succumb to malice or jealousy and, instead, learned to grow alongside each other and in support of each other. I like the idea in this book, particularly for Carmen, that they are just going to love each other whole-heartedly, no matter what. Do you think those things change as people get older? I think that relationships do change over time. And that’s another reason why Carmen has the role she does. She has an awareness that the relationship is fragile and that so many other priorities, like boyfriends or distance, can get in the way. People’s lives inevitably go in different directions as they get older, when they stop having so much in common. They have to work not to let it go. What do you hope teens will take away from reading The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants? Honestly, I mostly hope they'll enjoy it and take pleasure away. I want it to be the kind of book that will stick with them a bit, the way books I liked when I was that age stuck with me. If there's a message, I guess it's just this: love yourself and your friends unconditionally. (added from Random House)… (more)
May
18
Ann Brashares
Oblong Books & Music - Rhinebeck, Sunday, May 18 at 4pm
Ann Brashares (3 Willows, Forever in Blue: The Fourth Summer of the Sisterhood, GIRLS IN PANTS, GIRLS IN PANTS: The Third Summer of the Sisterhood, The Second Summer of the Sisterhood, Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, Sisterhood Everlasting (Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants), The Here and Now, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants Complete Collection, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants--3-book boxed set)

“I don’t really write with the idea of trying to teach any lessons. I want to tell a story as truthfully and engagingly as I can, and then let the chips fall where they may.”—Ann Brashares Ann Brashares grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland, with three brothers and attended a Quaker school in the D.C. area called Sidwell Friends. She studied Philosophy at Barnard College, part of Columbia University in New York City. Expecting to continue studying philosophy in graduate school, Ann took a year off after college to work as an editor, hoping to save money for school. Loving her job, she never went to graduate school, and instead, remained in New York City and worked as an editor for many years. Ann made the transition from editor to full-time writer to write her first novel, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants.ABOUT THE AUTHORAnn Brashares ON The Second Summer of the SisterhoodThe Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, your debut novel, received much critical praise, awards, and adoration from readers of all ages. What are your thoughts on its success and why do you think it resonated so heavily with readers? Its success has been a wonderful surprise each step of the way. From the outset I tried to keep my expectations very low. I know how hard it is to get a book published let alone have it succeed. I’ve read many excellent books that did not succeed commercially. Here I give credit to the publisher, Random House, and to the booksellers. They supported the book wholeheartedly. To the extent that it has resonated with readers, I am grateful for it. I sense that they have responded, more than anything else, to the unconditional love and loyalty that the Sisterhood represents. Has the success changed your writing process and expectations for the The Second Summer of the Sisterhood? I tried not to let the success change anything, but it kept creeping into my consciousness anyway. I worried that I wouldn’t live up to the hopes of my readers. I worried that I would forget how to write. I worried that I never knew how to write in the first place. I worried a lot and I wrote very little. When I finally forced myself back to my computer, I worried I had fallen out of touch with my characters. They felt to me like friends with whom I'd been intensely close, but hadn't seen in a long time. It's painful, in a way, to have to ask clunky, anonymous questions of people you used to know in an intimate, hour-by-hour way. Luckily, though, when I started to spend real time with Carmen and Bee and Tibby and Lena, I relaxed. I grew close to them again and enjoyed being with them so much, I forgot all the things I was worrying about. As for expectations, I still try to keep them in check. But I do allow myself to hope. I hope that readers who liked the first book will like the second one, too. Did you plan for the girls’ relationships with their mothers to play a stronger role in The Second Summer of the Sisterhood? Does your relationship with your own mother resemble any from the book?It didn’t start out that way exactly. As I was working out stories for each of the girls, I realized that most of them involved their mothers to some degree. So I just went with it. The mother-daughter bond is about as rich a subject as any I know. And I felt those relationships could give a center of gravity to a book that otherwise ran the risk of going in too many directions at once. My relationship with my mother doesn’t resemble any of the ones in the book precisely. There are some thematic similarities to Carmen, though, in that my parents were divorced and I had to come to terms with my mom having a romantic life of her own. As the mother of three young children, do you find that you relate more to the girls or their mothers? Even though I’m closer to the age of the mothers, I related more to the daughters. I think that’s because I wrote the book from the girls’ points of view. Although I tried really hard to imagine how the mothers would feel, I didn’t actually spend my days thinking their thoughts the way I do when I’ m writing in a character’s point of view. Also, my daughter is not a teenager yet. When she gets to be a teenager, then I’ll really understand what those mothers go through. Female friendship remains a central theme in the second book, do you have your own Sisterhood? In your writing, you seem to have a real understanding of the importance of those bonds, how have you come to know that?I have a few very good old friends from childhood and some more recent friends whom I love dearly. But truthfully, I think the Sisterhood is more fantasy than reality for me. I grew up in a house full of boys (wonderful boys, I should mention), and always dreamed about sisters. Do you have a sense of where the girls will be “next summer”? How do you see their growth continuing? Next summer will be the girls’ last before they split up to go to college. That’s going to be a big deal for them. I suspect Tibby is going to fall in love for the first time. I have a feeling Bridget might encounter Eric, the soccer coach, again. I have a few other plans up my sleeve, but I think I better keep them secret. What do you hope readers will take away from this second book? I don’t really write with the idea of trying to teach any lessons. I want to tell a story as truthfully and engagingly as I can, and then let the chips fall where they may. But I realize when I get to the end of the story, I care very much that my characters evolve and grow. In spite of their torments and their selfish impulses, I care that they are guided by a spirit of goodness. I want them to set a high standard for compassion and for friendship. Ann Brashares ON THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS How did you come up with the book’s unique central concept? Why traveling pants? The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants was born in an unusual way. I was working as an editor at the time, chatting in the office with a colleague and friend who told me about a summer when she and some girl friends shared a pair of pants. She told me the pants had sadly been lost in Borneo. My mind was immediately filled with all sorts of wonderful possibilities. I think pants have unique qualities, especially in a woman’s life. Whatever bodily insecurities we have, we seem to take out on our pants. In high school, my friends would have their skinny pants and their fat pants. I like pants that allow women not to judge their bodies. The Traveling Pants are the kind of pants that always love you. They fit my characters’ bodies in a non-restrictive way. Describe your favorite pair of pants. What makes them your favorite? At the moment, my favorite pair of pants are bright red. They are cropped, slightly flared summer pants. Like a good friend, they are flexible, forgiving, and boost my confidence even on really off days. They are low maintenance pants–never requiring dry cleaning or even ironing. The waistline is zippered and definite, so it doesn't have that subtly defeated quality of elastic. And these pants manage to make me feel loved even through major body transitions (like having a baby!). This story should resonate with young women because sharing clothes is such an integral part of many female friendships. Did you have a clothes-sharing experience that helped to shape the book? The concept of The Pants is directly related to my experience with my wedding dress. Before I had chosen a wedding dress, I had a picture in my mind of what mine would look like. One day, my mom and I were touring wedding venues in the Washington, DC area where I grew up. Our guide showed us some wedding photographs, and one of them showed a bride wearing a dress just like the one I had imagined. The tour guide invited me to take the picture home, so I did, and I left it in my drawer. A few months later, the sister of a friend, a young woman named Hope, asked if I had picked my wedding dress. I hadn't. Hope’s recent wedding hadn’t worked out. She wasn't broken-hearted about the groom, but she was broken-hearted about her beautiful, amazing dress not being worn. She asked me if I would consider wearing it at my wedding. I didn't know Hope very well, so I politely declined a few times. Yet she was strangely insistent and later arrived at our friend's apartment with a huge box. Through the clear plastic front I could see that the dress inside was remarkably familiar. It was exactly the same as the dress in the photograph I had put in my drawer. I was ecstatic. I tried to give the dress back to Hope, after I had worn it in my wedding, but she didn't want it. So I decided, in the spirit of her generosity, that it was a fortuitous, serendipitous kind of dress, and needed to be shared some more. Since then, it has been worn beautifully by my older brother's wife, my middle brother's wife, and my lifelong best friend. These are probably the three women I am closest to in my life–my own sisterhood. I'm hoping it will be worn again. In fact, I am imagining that instead of the next bride throwing the bouquet at the end of the wedding, she can ball up my wedding dress and throw that. Much of the novel takes place in Baja and Greece. Did travel play an influential role in your childhood or teenage years? I love to travel and have taken a lot of trips, but have never actually been to either Baja or Greece. I did a lot of reading and imagining for those stories. They existed more in my imagination than any place else. I love islands. I loved that Oia, the town where Lena’s grandparents lived, was stuck in time and had this geological drama in the background. I grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland, which was very Plain Jane. When I was a kid, I had a scrapbook that I used to write letters in from places I wished I could have gone. I would imagine being in Argentina and then write about all the incredible things I was seeing there. This book is almost like a continuation of those imaginary years. How old were you when you first fell in love? Who was he? Where were you? I first fell in love when I was 14 or 15, but it wasn’t immediate falling in love, it was a slow… slow fall. The person I fell in love with immediately was my husband. He is an artist and we met during my freshman year at Barnard. He sat across from me and drew a picture of me in the Columbia University Philosophy Reading Room. I hadn’t even noticed him, but a friend of mine saw what he was doing and told me. As soon as I went out with him, that was it. It was the first time I felt like I loved someone instantly. We’ve been together ever since. You’ve written about four very different girls. Are the characters in this book based on people you know or wish you had known? Oddly enough, they aren’t. They are composites of different people. I based Lena's story on the Greek myth of Artemis, the proud, boy-hating goddess of the hunt who, when spotted bathing by a suitor, turns the poor guy into a stag. I wanted my Lena to be less pleased with herself, though, and for her suitor to be more formidable. The story of Tibby and Bailey I based on the great, great movie It's a Wonderful Life. Bailey started out more like an angel than a person. I imagined her as an angel who revealed the cynical little prejudices and presumptions that I remember finding so seductive when I was fifteen. Carmen was the girl who said things I could never say and Bridget was the girl who did things I would never do. Who are you most like: Carmen, Tibby, Bridget or Lena? There’s a little bit of me in each of them. I would say I have more in common with Lena and Carmen than the other two. I have some life experience in common with Carmen, but we are considerably different too. I am a little like Carmen in that I sometimes feel as if I lose myself when I'm out of context. Also, I have dealt with issues of divorce and step families. For the protection of the innocent, though, I must say that my own family circumstances were completely different than hers. As for Lena, I guess I know what it is to feel awkward and inward sometimes, and romantically, to feel like a big chicken. Sometimes the girls provided me with an escape or a fantasy. Why did you choose Carmen to set up the story? Carmen struck me as the person who was most conscious–who recognized the importance of the girls’ friendship. She didn’t just live it, she knew it inside and out. I think she’s the most introspective of the four. What do you think are the most important aspects of female relationships? Loyalty and love. And I mean the kind of love that parents have–unconditional. So often, relationships become competitive or marked by pettiness or envy. For relationships to really transcend the negative stuff in life, they need to be without judgement. I wanted to create a story about a rare bunch of girls who didn't succumb to malice or jealousy and, instead, learned to grow alongside each other and in support of each other. I like the idea in this book, particularly for Carmen, that they are just going to love each other whole-heartedly, no matter what. Do you think those things change as people get older? I think that relationships do change over time. And that’s another reason why Carmen has the role she does. She has an awareness that the relationship is fragile and that so many other priorities, like boyfriends or distance, can get in the way. People’s lives inevitably go in different directions as they get older, when they stop having so much in common. They have to work not to let it go. What do you hope teens will take away from reading The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants? Honestly, I mostly hope they'll enjoy it and take pleasure away. I want it to be the kind of book that will stick with them a bit, the way books I liked when I was that age stuck with me. If there's a message, I guess it's just this: love yourself and your friends unconditionally. (added from Random House)… (more)
Apr
24
ANN BRASHARES - The Here & Now
BookPeople, Thursday, April 24 at 7pm
Thursday, Apr 24 at 7PM

BookPeople Presents

Bestselling Author of The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants Ann Brashares

speaking & signing her new YA novel The Here & Now From Ann Brashares, bestselling author of The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants and Divie Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood, comes a Young Adult novel. The Here & Now is an unforgettable epic romantic thriller about a girl from the future who might be able to save the world . . . if she lets go of the one thing she’s found to hold on to. Join us this evening as we welcome Ann!

This is the story of seventeen-year-old Prenna James, who immigrated to New York when she was twelve. Except Prenna didn’t come from a different country. She came from a different time—a future where a mosquito-borne illness has mutated into a pandemic, killing millions and leaving the world in ruins. Prenna and the others who escaped to the present day must follow a strict set of rules: never reveal where they’re from, never interfere with history, and never, ever be intimate with anyone outside their community. Prenna does as she’s told, believing she can help prevent the plague that will one day ravage the earth. But everything changes when Prenna falls for Ethan Jarves.

Ann Brashares lives in New York City with her husband and their three children. Her Sisterhood novels, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (which was made into a major motion picture), The Second Summer of the Sisterhood, and Girls in Pants: The Third Summer of the Sisterhood, comprise an internationally bestselling and award-winning series that reached #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. In order to have anything signed at a BookPeople event, a copy of the event book must be purchased from BookPeople. If you purchase your book from BookPeople in advance of the event, please save your receipt and present it at the event.

Thank you for supporting Ann Brashares & your local independent bookstore!

Location: Street: 603 N Lamar Blvd City: Austin, Province: Texas Postal Code: 78703-5413 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Apr
26
Houston Teen Book Con 2014
Blue Willow Bookshop, Saturday, April 26 at 09:30am
Our 5th annual TeenBookCon is going to be the best yet! This nationally recognized event is a great opportunity for teens and other fans of YA literature to interact with a variety of authors and graphic novelists. The fantastic librarians and educators who make up the executive committee are working hard to make this a day you will never forget. Once you see this line-up of rock stars, you will start making your plans to attend. For a schedule of the event, visit teenbookcon.org Where: Alief Taylor High School, 7555 Howell Sugar Land Road, Houston, TX 77083 When: Saturday, April 26, 9:30 – 5:00 We will have 28 authors and graphic novelists attending the festival this year: Keynote Speaker: Lauri Halse Anderson - The Impossible Knife of Memory Closing Speaker: Matt de la Peña - The Living Authors Charles Benoit - Cold Calls Ann Brashares - The Here and Now Cecil Castellucci - Tin Star Svetlana Chmakova - Witch & Wizard: The Manga, Vol. 3 Melissa de la Cruz - The Ring and the Crown Bree Despain - Into the Dark Book #1: The Shadow Prince Elizabeth Eulberg - Better Off Friends Shannon Hale - Dangerous Jenny Han - To All The Boys I've Loved Before Rachel Hawkins - Rebel Belle April Henry - The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die Brendan Kiely - The Gospel of Winter Emery Lord - Open Road Summer Sarah Mlynowski - Don't Even Think About It Lauren Myracle - TTYL Trent Reedy - Divided we fall Jason Reynolds - When I was the Greates Eliot Schrefer - Threatened Victoria Schwab - The Unbound (An Archived Novel) Victoria Scott - Fire & Flood Tess Sharpe - Far From You Jillian Tamaki - This One Summer Mariko Tamaki - Skim Laini Taylor - Dreams of Gods & Monsters Len Vlahos - The Scar Boys John Corey Whayley - Noggin Mini Grant Contest The author who sells the most books through Blue Willow Bookshop to people who will NOT be able to attend the festival will have a mini grant named for them that will be awarded to a librarian, selected at random, who attends TeenBookCon. Get a signed copy from one of your favorite authors and help a librarian get a mini grant! Ordering If you can't attend the event and want a PERSONALIZED copy shipped to you, you may call the store or add the appropriate book to your cart on our website. Payment type must be "CreditCard." To place an international order, please email orders@bluewillowbookshop.com to obtain shipping details and to have items shipped to you. Staff will respond within 24-48 hours. In order to ensure fulfillment the deadline for web orders is 5:00 p.m. Thursday April 24.

Location: Street: Alief Taylor High School Additional: 7555 Howell Sugar Land Road City: Houston, Province: Texas Postal Code: 77083 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
May
12
NY TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR ANN BRASHARES!
Harleysville Books, Monday, May 12 at 7pm
Ann Brashares is the #1 NY Times Bestselling author of the SISTERHOOD OF THE

TRAVELING PANTS SERIES and now she is coming to Harleysville to introduce her new book The Here and Now!

The Here and Now is an epic, contemporary romance about a girl torn between her destiny and the boy she loves.

Seventeen year-old Prenna James is forced to follow a strict set of rules: Never reveal that she’s from the year 2103, never interfere with the course of history, and most importantly never be intimate with anyone outside her community of time travelers. If Prenna is going to help prevent the plague that will ravage earth, she cannot stray from these restrictions. But everything changes when she falls in love with Ethan Jarves.

Ethan is the only person who understands her. Incredibly, he seems to know who she really is and where she’s really from. Together Prenna and Ethan set out on a breathtaking, time-bending mission to stop mankind’s destruction.

The Here and Now is a twenty first-century take on impossible, forbidden romance. Truly the master of the teen voice, Ann Brashares once again delivers a heart-stopping story line that will move and inspire her legions of fans and introduce her to a whole new generation of women readers. It is truly Ann Brashares at her best.

EVENT DETAILS: Your ticket is your purchase of Ann's newest novel, The Here and Now (on sale April 8, 2014). Copies of the book must be purchased at Harleysville Books. One book purchase per family is needed. You can reserve and pay for your book by calling the store at 215-256-9311 or order through our website using the link below and adding your book to your cart.

You are more than welcome to reserve and purchase any of Ann Brashare's titles listed below. All books will be available for sale the night of the event. However, due to space and time constraints, no outside books will be permitted to be brought in from home that night.

If you cannot attend this event, but would like us to get a personalized, signed copy for you, please contact the store to make arrangements. Personalized, signed books make special gifts, especially for Mother's Day!

If you have questions, please call us. We're happy to help!

Location: Street: 680 Main Street Additional: Salford Square City: Harleysville, Province: Pennsylvania Postal Code: 19438-1665 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Ann Brashares chatted with LibraryThing members from Jun 6, 2011 to Jun 10, 2011. Read the chat.

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