HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Author photo. Langston Hughes (1902-1967)
Photography by Jack Delano, april 1942.
(Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, Library of Congress)

Langston Hughes (1902-1967) Photography by Jack Delano, april 1942. (Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, Library of Congress)

MembersReviewsPopularityRatingFavorited   Events   
5,797 (9,524)2742,025 (4.13)440
Works by Langston Hughesorganize | filter
Also by Langston Hughesorganize | filter
Members
Related tags
Events on LibraryThing Local

Langston Hughes has 3 media appearances.

Apr
22
Langston Hughes
Booknotes, Sunday, April 22, 2001
Langston Hughes discusses Remember Me to Harlem: The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten, 1925-1964.

These engaging and wonderfully alive letters paint an intimate portrait of two of the most important and influential figures of the Harlem Renaissance. Carl Van Vechten—older, established, and white—was at first a mentor to the younger, gifted, and black Langston Hughes. But the relationship quickly grew into a great friendship—and for nearly four decades the two men wrote to each other expressively and constantly. They discussed literature and publishing. They exchanged favorite blues lyrics (?So now I know what Bessie Smith really meant by ?Thirty days in jail / With ma back turned to de wall,?? Hughes wrote Van Vechten after a stay in a Cleveland jail on trumped-up charges). They traded stories about the hottest parties and the wildest speakeasies. They argued politics. They gossiped about the people they knew in common—James Baldwin, W. E. B. Du Bois, Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, H. L. Mencken. They wrote from near (of racism in Scottsboro) and far (of dancing in Cuba and trekking across the Soviet Union), and always with playfulness and mutual affection. Today Van Vechten is a controversial figure; some consider him exploitative, at best peripheral to the Harlem Renaissance or, indeed, as the author of the novel Nigger Heaven, a blemish upon it, and upon Hughes by association. The letters tell a different, more subtle and complex story: Van Vechten did, in fact, help Hughes (and many other young black writers) to get published; Hughes in turn appreciated what Van Vechten was trying to do in Nigger Heaven and defended him, fiercely. For all their differences, Hughes and Van Vechten remained staunchly loyal to each other throughout their lives. A correspondence of great cultural significance, judiciously gathered together here for the first time and annotated by the insightful young scholar Emily Bernard, Remember Me to Harlem shows us an unlikely friendship, one that is essential to our understanding of literature and race relations in twentieth-century America. —from the publisher (timspalding)… (more)
Oct
23
James Hughes
To The Best of Our Knowledge, Sunday, October 23, 2005 at 0am

Langston Hughes has 3 past events. (show)

Common Knowledgehistory Creative Commons License
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical name
Legal name
Other names
Date of birth
Date of death
Burial location
Gender
Nationality
Country (for map)
Birthplace
Place of death
Places of residence
Education
Occupations
Relationships
Organizations
Awards and honors
Agents
Short biography
Disambiguation notice

Member ratings

Average: (4.13)
0.5
1 6
1.5 2
2 36
2.5 13
3 160
3.5 37
4 371
4.5 39
5 412

Author pictures (5)

(see all 5 author pictures)

Improve this author

Combine/separate works

Author division

Langston Hughes is currently considered a "single author." If one or more works are by a distinct, homonymous authors, go ahead and split the author.

Includes

Langston Hughes is composed of 16 names. You can examine and separate out names.

Combine with…

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,706,553 books! | Top bar: Always visible