HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist

Violet Hunt (1862–1942)

Author of Tales Of The Uneasy

Includes the names: Violet Hunt, Isabel Violet Hunt

MembersReviewsPopularityRatingFavorited   Events   
43 (502)3221,468 (4.11)00
No events listed. (add an event)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical name
Legal name
Other names
Date of birth
Date of death
Burial location
Gender
Nationality
Country (for map)
Birthplace
Place of death
Places of residence
Education
Occupations
Relationships
Organizations
Awards and honors
Agents
Short biography
Isobel Violet Hunt, known as Violet, was born in Durham, England, the daughter of William Albert Hunt, a landscape painter, and his wife Margaret Raine Hunt, a writer. The family moved to London when she was a small child. She grew up among the Pre-Raphaelite artists and writers, including the Rossettis, John Ruskin, and William Morris, and studied art. She became a feminist and campaigned for women's suffrage. She was a prolific writer of fiction and nonfiction. Her best-known work was probably The Wife of Rossetti (1932), a biography of Elizabeth Siddal, based on her own memories. Her first published novel was The Maiden's Progress (1894), a work of the "New Woman" genre that represented her ideals as feminist. It was followed by 16 more, including Sooner or Later (1904), The White Rose of Weary Leaf (1908), and The Tiger Skin (1924). She also wrote the supernatural short stories Tales of the Uneasy (1911). She presided over a renowned literary salon at South Lodge, her home in Campden Hill that included D.H. Lawrence, Rebecca West, Ezra Pound, Joseph Conrad, Henry James, and H.G. Wells. She lived with Ford Madox Ford (the pen name of Ford Hermann Hueffer) for about 8 years and collaborated with him in writing Zeppelin Nights (1915), a book of historical sketches. She is said to have been the model for Florence Dowell in Ford's novel The Good Soldier (1915) and Sylvia Tietjens in his 4-volume novel Parade's End (1924-1928). Her autobiography was entitled The Flurried Years (1926), published in the USA as I Have This To Say.
Disambiguation notice

Member ratings

Average: (4.11)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 8
3.5 3
4 16
4.5 1
5 16

Improve this author

Combine/separate works

Author division

Violet Hunt is currently considered a "single author." If one or more works are by a distinct, homonymous authors, go ahead and split the author.

Includes

Violet Hunt is composed of 3 names. You can examine and separate out names.

Combine with…

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 116,937,470 books! | Top bar: Always visible