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Author photo. Angelina Emily Grimké (1805–1879)
Wood engraving in E. C. Stanton History of Woman Suffrage, [1881?]
(Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

Angelina Emily Grimké (1805–1879) Wood engraving in E. C. Stanton History of Woman Suffrage, [1881?] (Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

Angelina Emily Grimke (1805–1879)

Author of Walking by Faith: The Diary of Angelina Grimke, 1828-1835

Includes the names: Angelina Emily Grimke, Angelina Emily Grimké

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Disambiguation Notice

Do not combine or confuse with Angelina Weld Grimké, her great-niece.

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Short biography
Angelina Emily Grimké and her much older sister Sarah Moore Grimké, known as the Grimké sisters, were two of the 14 children of a South Carolina plantation owner and prominent judge. Their father owned hundreds of slaves, but Angelina and Sarah grew to hate slavery. In 1819, Sarah moved to Philadelphia, where she joined the Society of Friends, or Quakers, and Angelina joined her a few years later. Angelina and Sarah spent their lives as educators, writers, and early anti-slavery and women's rights advocates. They traveled and lectured about their first-hand knowledge of the evils of slavery, which brought abuse and ridicule for their activism. They were among the American first women to act publicly in social reform movements. In 1835, Angelina wrote a personal letter against slavery published by William Lloyd Garrison in his abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator. She followed this up with An Appeal to the Christian Women of the South (1836) and An Appeal to the Women of the Nominally Free States (1837). The two sisters edited American Slavery as It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses (1839), a collection of stories from southern newspapers written by their editors. In 1838, Angelina married Theodore Weld, a fellow abolitionist, and the couple moved with Sarah to Belleville, New Jersey, where they opened a school. During the Civil War, the Grimké sisters publicly supported President Lincoln in letters and speeches. Later, Angelina and her husband moved with Sarah to Hyde Park, Massachusetts, where the two sisters continued to campaign for women's rights until the end of their lives.
Disambiguation notice
Do not combine or confuse with Angelina Weld Grimké, her great-niece.

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