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People/Characters: Ay

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Works (18)

TitlesOrder
Akhenaten: The Heretic King by Donald B. Redford
Amarna Sunset: Nefertiti, Tutankhamun, Ay, Horemheb, and the Egyptian Counter-Reformation by Aidan Dodson
The Eye of Horus by Carol Thurston
House of Rejoicing by Libbie Hawker
Jongensdagen by Theo Thijssennot in English Common Knowledge de vriend van Ko en Henk
The Lost Queen of Egypt by Lucile MorrisonFanbearer on the Right of Pharaoh
Murder in the Place of Anubis by Lynda S. Robinson
The murder of Tutankhamen by Bob Brier
The Mysterious Death of Tutankhamun by Paul Doherty
Nefertiti by Nick Drake
Nefertiti by Michelle Moran
Pharaohs of the Sun: Akhenaten : Nefertiti : Tutankhamen by Rita E. Freed
Sphinx's Princess by Esther Friesner
The Story of Egypt by Joann Fletcher
Tut Reborn by Cyci Cade
Tut: The Story of the Pharaoh and the Girl Who Loved Him by Robin Martin Berard
Tutankhamen by Christiane Desroches-Noblecourt
Tutankhamun: The Book of Shadows by Nick Drake

Character description

Ay was the penultimate Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt's 18th dynasty. He held the throne of Egypt for a brief four-year period (probably 1323–1319 BC[1] or 1327–1323 BC, depending on which chronology is followed), although he was a close advisor to two and perhaps three of the pharaohs who ruled before him and was said to be the power behind the throne during Tutankhamun's reign. Ay's prenomen or royal name—Kheperkheperure—means "Everlasting are the Manifestations of Ra" while his birth name Ay it-netjer reads as 'Ay, Father of the God.'[2] Records and monuments that can be clearly attributed to Ay are rare, not only due to his short length of reign, but also because his successor, Horemheb, instigated a campaign of damnatio memoriae against him and other pharaohs associated with the unpopular Amarna Period.

Ay in Wikipedia

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m_k_m (33), DisassemblyOfReason (27), joririchardson (8), JalenV (7), Croselan (5), supersidvicious (3), Jozefus (2), catrn (2), FMRox (2), PuddinTame (2), souloftherose (1), legxleg (1), MDTLibrarian (1), raphamel (1)
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