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Location: Boston, MA, United States

Little Libraries

There are 11 "Little Libraries" within 25 miles.

Local venues

5 Post Office Square, Suite 100, Boston, MA 02109
Lobby #101, 15 Court Square, Boston, MA 02108
Commonwealth Books (0.1 miles)
9 Spring Ln., Boston, MA 02109
2 Milk Street, Boston, MA 02109
73 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02138
Social Law Library (0.2 miles)
One Pemberton Square, 4th Floor, Boston, MA 02108
10½ Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02108
120 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02138
14 Beacon Street, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA 02108
24 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02133
LibraryThing is collection-aware
25 Parmenter Street, Boston, MA 02113
Brattle Book Shop (0.4 miles)
9 West Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02111
UUA Bookstore (0.4 miles)
25 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108
Dewey Square, Boston, MA 02111
151 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114
98 North Washington St., Suite 401, Boston, MA 02214
LibraryThing is collection-aware
2 South Station, Boston, MA 02110
Calamus Bookstore (0.5 miles)
92B South Street, Boston, MA 02111
144 Lincoln Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02111
80 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116
120 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116
64 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02108
145 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02111
10 Park Plaza, Boston, MA 02116
243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114

Local events

Mar
29
Morning Book Group
Flint Memorial Library, Wednesday, March 29 at 11:15am
We will be discussing Eye of the Needle by Ken Follet. All are welcome to attend. (added from Eventkeeper)
Mar
29
Kids Create Art on Computers
Thayer Public Library, Wednesday, March 29 at 4:45pm
Children age 7 to 11 years old may create art on our computers and laptops:
Make a wacky head in the style of Picasso
Decorate a screen in the dripping, splotchy style of Jackson Pollack (but no mess!)
Experiment to create your own original creations on the computer .
This program is available to the first 25 youth, age 7 to 11, that arrive.
This program is part of One Book One Braintree 2017: "The Muralist", which is sponsored by the Friends of Thayer Public Library. (added from Eventkeeper)
… (more)
Mar
29
Jeffrey L. Amestoy, Slavish Shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana Jr.
Medford Public Library, Wednesday, March 29 at 7pm
Jeffrey L. Amestoy, Slavish shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana Jr.

Speaking at the Medford Public Library (added from Harvard University Press)
Mar
30
SPECIAL Thursday Night at the Movies
Mansfield Public Library, Thursday, March 30 at 7pm
Come to your local library for a Thursday night movie showing. The Mansfield Public Library hosts monthly bestselling movie showings from 6pm to 8pm. This month’s movie is a special documentary on Ellis Island presented by PBS. "Visit the abandoned immigrant hospital on Ellis Island. During the great wave of immigration, 22 medical buildings sprawled across two islands adjacent to Ellis Island, the largest port of entry to the United States. Massive and modern, the hospital was America's first line of defense against contagious, often virulent, disease. In the era before antibiotics, tens of thousands of immigrant patients were separated from family, detained in the hospital and healed from illness before becoming citizens." Contact the library for this month’s title or come in and check out the flyer! This program is free and open to all ages. No registration is required.
This program is part of our One Book One Community 2017 pick The Fall of Marigolds by Susan Meissner. Meet the author via Skype on Thursday March 16 at 7pm. Please register for the author Skype session under that event. For more information, please contact Amy Rosa, Reference Librarian, at (508) 261-7380 or arosa@sailsinc.org. (added from Eventkeeper)
… (more)
Mar
30
Adult book to movie group
Hanson Public Library, Thursday, March 30 at 7:30pm
this month we are reading
Charlie Wilson's war : the extraordinary story of the largest covert operation in history - Crile, George.
and watching the movie of the same name with Tom Hanks (added from Eventkeeper)
Mar
30
Let's Write - A Flash Nonfiction Workshop
Winthrop Public Library, Thursday, March 30 at 7:30pm
Let's Write - A Flash Nonfiction Workshop
6 weeks of instruction with Manal Khan 
We all have stories that are begging to be shared, but we feel overwhelmed when trying to put pen to paper.  In this workshop we will start small,
1,000 words or less in brief "flash" forms.  If interested, we have more information about the classes at the library. 
Free, but limited to 6 participants.  Sign up by calling or stopping by the library. 
  (added from Eventkeeper)
… (more)
Mar
30
Author Stephen Kurkjian- 'Master Thieves'
Stoughton Public Library, Thursday, March 30 at 8pm
Stephen Kurkjian, former Boston Globe author and editor, will speak about his book 'Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World's Greatest Art Heist'.
Mr. Kurkjian is a founding member of the Globe's Spotlight Team. He will answer questions about investigations such as the Boston Archdiocese scandal and the Rhode Island nightclub fire.
Copies of his book will be made available for purchase and author signing. (added from Eventkeeper)… (more)
Mar
30
Evening Book Group
Fiske Public Library, Thursday, March 30 at 8pm
Book : All We Had by Annie Weatherwax
Comedy and Realism - A Mother and Daughter Story
Copies are available at the circulation desk.
FACILITATOR : CLAIRE MAURO
  (added from Eventkeeper)
Mar
31
Creative Writing for Fun (FULL)
Weston Public Library, Friday, March 31 at 11am
Discover your creativity by exploring the hidden stories in your mind. Every week is an adventure with in-class writing (fiction and non-fiction), writing topics and tips, and shared reading. A zeal for the zany and poignant, a sense of humor, and a willingness to be open and honest lead you to inspired writing. This free class is open to adults age 18 and over. This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Pamela Wight has an M.A. in Literature and has taught creative writing classes in New England and San Francisco Bay area for two decades, and is the author of two books of fiction and a weekly blog called Roughwighting. (added from Eventkeeper)… (more)
Mar
31
Book Trivia Night
Swampscott Public Library, Friday, March 31 at 8:30pm
Come join us for a Book Trivia Night, a part of our Centennial Celebration. Register yourself or gather a team and register everyone.
No charge. Refreshments include wine, beer and appetizers. (added from Eventkeeper)
Mar
31
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design
Boylston Hall, Friday, March 31 at 8:30pm
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design

An Evening with Iris Bohnet, sponsored by the Alumnae/i Network for Harvard Women and the Harvard Alumni Association (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
1
Friends' Book and Bake Sale
Pembroke Public Library, Saturday, April 1 at 11am
Apr
1
Truly Eleanor
Thayer Public Library, Saturday, April 1 at 3pm
Truly Eleanor performed by the Delvena Theatre Company
Here in this three-person, live performance, Eleanor Roosevelt shares some of her most private and meaningful moments - her lonely childhood; her joyous courtship and marriage with her fifth cousin, Franklin; her devastation at Franklin's love affair with her own social secretary; her resolve to make him president after his polio diagnosis; her involvement in his presidency; and her eventual triumph at the United Nations. "Truly Eleanor" takes a candid look at our greatest First Lady's courage and at her great contributions to human rights and liberty for all. The cast will open up for discussion of the subject matter after the performance.
Part of the One Braintree One Book community read. No registration necessary. Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by the Friends of Thayer Public Library (added from Eventkeeper)
… (more)
Apr
2
Free author event with Cass Sunstein and "#republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media"
The Concord Bookshop, Sunday, April 2 at 3pm
Please join us on Sunday, April 2 at 3pm, when Cass Sunstein presents his new work, "#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media." This is a free event; there will be time after the presentation for Q&A and book signing.

Cass R. Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School. His many books include the New York Times bestsellers "Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness" (with Richard H. Thaler) and "The World According to Star Wars." He lives in Massachusetts.

As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views. It's no accident that on some occasions, people of different political views cannot even understand each other. It's also no surprise that terrorist groups have been able to exploit social media to deadly effect.

Welcome to the age of #Republic.

In this revealing book, Cass Sunstein shows how today's Internet is driving political fragmentation, polarization, and even extremism--and what can be done about it.

Thoroughly rethinking the critical relationship between democracy and the Internet, Sunstein describes how the online world creates "cybercascades," exploits "confirmation bias," and assists "polarization entrepreneurs." And he explains why online fragmentation endangers the shared conversations, experiences, and understandings that are the lifeblood of democracy.

In response, Sunstein proposes practical and legal changes to make the Internet friendlier to democratic deliberation. These changes would get us out of our information cocoons by increasing the frequency of unchosen, unplanned encounters and exposing us to people, places, things, and ideas that we would never have picked for our Twitter feed.

#Republic need not be an ironic term. As Sunstein shows, it can be a rallying cry for the kind of democracy that citizens of diverse societies most need. (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
3
Stephen Burt, The Poem Is You: Sixty Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them
Harvard Book Store, Monday, April 3 at 7:30pm
Stephen Burt, The poem is you: Sixty Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them

In conversation with Chloe Garcia Roberts, editor of the Harvard Review (signing to follow), Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
4
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design
The Brattle Theatre, Tuesday, April 4 at 6pm
Iris Bohnet, What Works: Gender Equality by Design

In conversation with the Harvard Kennedy School’s Max Bazerman (signing to follow), Brattle Theatre (sponsored by Harvard Book Store) (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
4
Adam S. Wilkins, illustrated by Sarah Kennedy, Making Faces: The Evolutionary Origins of the Human Face
The Harvard Coop, Tuesday, April 4 at 8pm
Adam S. Wilkins, illustrated by Sarah Kennedy, Making Faces: The Evolutionary Origins of the Human Face

Speaking and signing, The Harvard Coop (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
6
Catherine J. Ross, Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights
Harvard Graduate School of Education, Thursday, April 6 at 1pm
Catherine J. Ross, Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights

Speaking at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
6
Richard Higgins presents "Thoreau and the Language of Trees"
The Concord Bookshop, Thursday, April 6 at 7pm
Please join us on Thursday, April 6 at 7pm, when Concordian Richard Higgins discusses his new book, "Thoreau and the Language of Trees."

There will be a time for questions, conversation, and a book signing after the presentation. This is a free event.

Trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When Thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself. In short, he spoke their language.

In this original book, Richard Higgins explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.” Thoreau and the Language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world.

Richard Higgins is a former longtime staff writer for the Boston Globe, the coauthor of "Portfolio Life: The New Path to Work, Purpose, and Passion after 50," and the coeditor of "Taking Faith Seriously." His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including the New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, Christian Century, and Smithsonian. He lives in Concord, Massachusetts.
Books ⋅ Literature (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
6
Daniel R. Coquillette and Bruce A. Kimball, On the Battlefield of Merit: Harvard Law School, the First Century
Isaac Royall House and Slave Quarters, Thursday, April 6 at 7:30pm
Daniel R. Coquillette and Bruce A. Kimball, On the Battlefield of Merit: Harvard Law School, the First Century

Bruce Coquillette speaking and signing, New England Historical Society (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
9
Andrew Forsthoefel presents "Walking to Listen: 4,000 Miles Across America, One Story at a Time"
The Concord Bookshop, Sunday, April 9 at 3pm
Please join us on Sunday, April 9 at 3pm, when Andrew Forsthoefel talks about Walking to Listen, which shares his journey across the country, and the tales of the people he met along the way.

Andrew Forsthoefel is a writer, radio producer, and public speaker. After graduating from Middlebury College in 2011, he spent nearly a year walking across the United States. It was the greatest privilege and blessing of his life. He now facilitates workshops on walking and listening as practices in personal transformation, interconnection, and conflict resolution. He is currently based in Northampton, Massachusetts.

A memoir of one young man’s coming of age on a cross-country trek—told through the stories of the people of all ages, races, and inclinations he meets along the highways of America.

Life is fast, and I’ve found it’s easy to confuse the miraculous for the mundane, so I’m slowing down, way down, in order to give my full presence to the extraordinary that infuses each moment and resides in every one of us.

At twenty-three, Andrew Forsthoefel walked out the back door of his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, with a backpack, an audio recorder, his copies of Whitman and Rilke, and a sign that read WALKING TO LISTEN. He had just graduated from Middlebury College and was ready to begin his adult life, but he didn’t know how. So he decided he’d walk. And listen. It would be a cross-country quest for guidance, and everyone he met would be his guide.

Walking toward the Pacific, he faced an Appalachian winter and a Mojave summer. He met beasts inside: fear, loneliness, doubt. But he also encountered incredible kindness from strangers. Thousands shared their stories with him, sometimes confiding their prejudices, too. Often he didn’t know how to respond. How to find unity in diversity? How to stay connected, even as fear works to tear us apart? He listened for answers to these questions, and to the existential questions every human must face, and began to find that the answer might be in listening itself.

Ultimately, it’s the stories of others living all along the roads of America that carry this journey and sing out in a hopeful, heartfelt book about how a life is made, and how our nation defines itself on the most human level. (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
11
Allyson Hobbs, A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life
Harvard Book Store, Tuesday, April 11 at 7pm
Allyson Hobbs, A chosen exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life

Speaking and signing, Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
13
David A. Moss, Democracy: A Case Study
David A. Moss, Democracy: A Case Study

Speaking and signing, Baker Library, Harvard Business School (Books@Baker series) (added from Harvard University Press)
Apr
13
Jim Shepard presents "The World to Come"
The Concord Bookshop, Thursday, April 13 at 7pm
Please join us on Thursday, April 13 at 7pm, when Jim Shepard presents his new short fiction collection, "The World to Come: Stories."

“Without a doubt the most ambitious story writer in America,” according to The Daily Beast, Jim Shepard now delivers a new collection that spans borders and centuries with unrivaled mastery.

These ten stories ring with voices belonging to - among others - English Arctic explorers in one of history’s most nightmarish expeditions, a young contemporary American negotiating the shockingly underreported hazards of our crude-oil trains, eighteenth-century French balloonists inventing manned flight, and two mid-nineteenth-century housewives trying to forge a connection despite their isolation on the frontier of settlement. In each case the personal is the political as these characters face everything from the emotional pitfalls of everyday life to historic catastrophes on a global scale. In his fifth collection, Shepard makes each of these wildly various worlds his own, and never before has he delineated anything like them so powerfully.

Jim Shepard is the author of seven novels and four previous story collections. He lives in Williamstown, Massachusetts, with his wife, three children, and three beagles. He teaches at Williams College. (TooFondOfBooks)
… (more)
Apr
17
Linda M. Heywood, Njinga of Angola: Africa’s Warrior Queen
Harvard Book Store, Monday, April 17 at 7pm
Linda M. Heywood, Njinga of Angola: Africa’s Warrior Queen

Speaking and signing, Harvard Book Store (added from Harvard University Press)
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