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Location: Cumston, ME 04259-0239, United States

Little Libraries

There are 11 "Little Libraries" within 25 miles.

Local venues

1600 Forest Avenue, Portland, ME 04101
LibraryThing is collection-aware
716 Stevens Avenue, Portland, ME 04103
377 Stevens Avenue, Portland, ME 04101
LibraryThing is collection-aware
Letterpress Books (2.0 miles)
91 Auburn St, Portland, ME 04103
800 Main Street, Westbrook, ME 04092
Andover College (2.4 miles)
901 Washington Avenue, Portland, ME 04103
25 Forest Avenue, Portland, ME 04101
96 Falmouth St., Portland, Maine 04104-9300
246 Deering Ave., Portland, ME 04102
Annie's Book Stop (3.0 miles)
295 Forest Ave., Portland, ME 04101
314 Forest Avenue, Portland, ME 04101
110 Marginal Way, #777, Portland, ME 04101
22 Bramhall Street, Portland, ME 04102
195 North Street, Portland, ME 04101
LibraryThing is collection-aware
430 Gorham Road, South Portland, ME 04106
661 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101
Coast City Comics (3.6 miles)
656 Congress Street, Portland, Maine 04101
519 Congress Street, Portland, Maine 04101-3426
Yes Books (3.7 miles)
589 Congress St, Portland, ME 04101
489 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101
5 Monument Square, Portland, ME 04101
LibraryThing is collection-aware
Longfellow Books (3.7 miles)
1 Federal Street / 1 Monument Way, Portland, ME 04101
142 Federal Street, Portland, ME 04101
241 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101
Casablanca Comics (3.9 miles)
151 Middle St., Portland, ME 04101

Local events

Mar
5
Jennifer Jacobson: Paper Things *at Longfellow Books*
Longfellow Books, Thursday, March 5 at 7pm
Paper Things by Jennifer Jacobson Thursday, March 5th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books When forced to choose between staying with her guardian and being with her big brother, Ari chose her big brother. There’s just one problem—Gage doesn’t actually have a place to live. When Ari’s mother died four years ago, she had two final wishes: that Ari and her older brother, Gage, would stay together always, and that Ari would go to Carter, the middle school for gifted students. So when nineteen-year-old Gage decides he can no longer live with their bossy guardian, Janna, Ari knows she has to go with him. But it’s been two months, and Gage still hasn’t found them an apartment. He and Ari have been "couch surfing," staying with Gage’s friend in a tiny apartment, crashing with Gage’s girlfriend and two roommates, and if necessary, sneaking into a juvenile shelter to escape the cold Maine nights. But all of this jumping around makes it hard for Ari to keep up with her schoolwork, never mind her friendships, and getting into Carter starts to seem impossible. Will Ari be forced to break one of her promises to Mama? Told in an open, authentic voice, this nuanced story of hiding in plain sight may have readers thinking about homelessness in a whole new way. "Jacobson elevates her book beyond "problem novel" territory with an engaging narrator who works hard to be loyal to her brother—and to her mother’s memory. Small moments pack big emotional wallops ... A tender exploration of homelessness." -Publishers Weekly Ari's plight vividly illustrates the myriad consequences of homelessness, and the adults around her who should be picking up on the numerous clues to her situation seem oblivious. Her perceptive first-person voice neatly captures her conflicted loyalty to Gage but also to Janna, as well as her valiant attempts to make an impossible situation work out." -Kirkus Reviews Jennifer Richard Jacobson is a writer, teacher, educational consultant, editor, and speaker. She writes in many genres, from children’s fiction to adult nonfiction. Among her books for younger readers are the Andy Shane early chapter books, the middle-grade novel Small as an Elephant, and the young adult novels Stained and The Complete History of Why I Hate Her. About Paper Things, she says, “This story allowed me to think deeply about the kids I worry about: those who for one reason or another lose their foundation of support (or never quite had it), children with so much potential…and yet they fall through the cracks.” Jennifer Richard Jacobson lives in Cumberland, Maine. Bring the family and join us for a reading with an author who makes adults want to read young adult books, ask your questions and get your books signed! Longfellow Books and Jennifer Jacobson will be donating a portion of sales to the Preble Street Shelter to help support its work creating solutions for homeless, hunger, and poverty. Ari's plight vividly illustrates the myriad consequences of homelessness, and the adults around her who should be picking up on the numerous clues to her situation seem oblivious. Her perceptive first-person voice neatly captures her conflicted loyalty to Gage but also to Janna, as well as her valiant attempts to make an impossible situation work out." -Kirkus Reviews Jennifer Richard Jacobson is a writer, teacher, educational consultant, editor, and speaker. She writes in many genres, from children’s fiction to adult nonfiction. Among her books for younger readers are the Andy Shane early chapter books, the middle-grade novel Small as an Elephant, and the young adult novels Stained and The Complete History of Why I Hate Her. About Paper Things, she says, “This story allowed me to think deeply about the kids I worry about: those who for one reason or another lose their foundation of support (or never quite had it), children with so much potential…and yet they fall through the cracks.” Jennifer Richard Jacobson lives in Cumberland, Maine. Bring the family and join us for a reading with an author who makes adults want to read young adult books, ask your questions and get your books signed! Longfellow Books and Jennifer Jacobson will be donating a portion of sales to the Preble Street Shelter to help support its work creating solutions for homeless, hunger, and poverty. Jennifer Richard Jacobson is a writer, teacher, educational consultant, editor, and speaker. She writes in many genres, from children’s fiction to adult nonfiction. Among her books for younger readers are the Andy Shane early chapter books, the middle-grade novel Small as an Elephant, and the young adult novels Stained and The Complete History of Why I Hate Her. About Paper Things, she says, “This story allowed me to think deeply about the kids I worry about: those who for one reason or another lose their foundation of support (or never quite had it), children with so much potential…and yet they fall through the cracks.” Jennifer Richard Jacobson lives in Cumberland, Maine. Bring the family and join us for a reading with an author who makes adults want to read young adult books, ask your questions and get your books signed! Longfellow Books and Jennifer Jacobson will be donating a portion of sales to the Preble Street Shelter to help support its work creating solutions for homeless, hunger, and poverty.

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Mar
7
Josh Cook
Sherman's Books & Stationery, Saturday, March 7 at 6pm
Josh Cook (An Exaggerated Murder) (added from Random House)
Mar
20
Eddie Joyce
Think Tank, Friday, March 20 at 7pm
Eddie Joyce

EDDIE JOYCE was born and raised on Staten Island. A graduate of Harvard University and Georgetown Law Center, he practiced law in Manhattan for ten years. When his twin daughters were born in 2009, he left the legal profession to stay home and help raise them while pursuing his dream of being a writer. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and three daughters. Follow @eddiejjoyce on Twitter. (added from Random House)… (more)
Mar
23
Pope Brock and Steve Langan *at Longfellow Books*
Longfellow Books, Monday, March 23 at 7pm
Pope Brock and Steve Langan Monday, March 23rd, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books Pope Brock is the author of two books: Indiana Gothic (Doubleday/Nan A. Talese), the story of the murder of his great-grandfather, and Charlatan: America’s Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him and the Age of Flim Flam (Crown), named by New York Times critic Janet Maslin as one of the ten best books of 2008. He has written for many publications including Esquire, GQ, Rolling Stone and People and has been a longtime contributor to the London Sunday Times Magazine. He teaches fiction and nonfiction at the University of Nebraska low-residency MFA program. Steve Langan graduated from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he received the Paul Engle Postgraduate Fellowship from the James Michener Foundation. His collection What It Looks Like, How It Flies will be released in 2015. His previous collection of poems, Meet Me at the Happy Bar, 2009, is from BlazeVOX books. Notes on Exile & Other Poems, a chapbook, received the 2005 Weldon Kees Award from the Backwaters Press. Langan’s debut collection, Freezing, was published in 2001 by New Issues Poetry & Prose. His poems have appeared in The Kenyon Review, Chicago Review, DoubleTake, Colorado Review, Prairie Schooner, Verse, Fence, Witness and Shade; recent publications include Beloit Poetry Journal, Drunken Boat, The Iowa Review, Poetry Salzburg Review, North American Review, Notre Dame Review, Tarpaulin Sky, Gettysburg Review and Zoland Poetry. Langan serves as Executive Director of HONOReform, a national patient advocacy organization, and he’s founder and director of the Seven Doctors Project. He lives in Omaha and, during part of the year, on Cliff Island, Maine. Join us for an evening with these two diverse talents, ask your questions, share your thoughts and get your books signed! Pope Brock is the author of two books: Indiana Gothic (Doubleday/Nan A. Talese), the story of the murder of his great-grandfather, and Charlatan: America’s Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him and the Age of Flim Flam (Crown), named by New York Times critic Janet Maslin as one of the ten best books of 2008. He has written for many publications including Esquire, GQ, Rolling Stone and People and has been a longtime contributor to the London Sunday Times Magazine. He teaches fiction and nonfiction at the University of Nebraska low-residency MFA program. Steve Langan graduated from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he received the Paul Engle Postgraduate Fellowship from the James Michener Foundation. His collection What It Looks Like, How It Flies will be released in 2015. His previous collection of poems, Meet Me at the Happy Bar, 2009, is from BlazeVOX books. Notes on Exile & Other Poems, a chapbook, received the 2005 Weldon Kees Award from the Backwaters Press. Langan’s debut collection, Freezing, was published in 2001 by New Issues Poetry & Prose. His poems have appeared in The Kenyon Review, Chicago Review, DoubleTake, Colorado Review, Prairie Schooner, Verse, Fence, Witness and Shade; recent publications include Beloit Poetry Journal, Drunken Boat, The Iowa Review, Poetry Salzburg Review, North American Review, Notre Dame Review, Tarpaulin Sky, Gettysburg Review and Zoland Poetry. Langan serves as Executive Director of HONOReform, a national patient advocacy organization, and he’s founder and director of the Seven Doctors Project. He lives in Omaha and, during part of the year, on Cliff Island, Maine. Join us for an evening with these two diverse talents, ask your questions, share your thoughts and get your books signed! Join us for an evening with these two diverse talents, ask your questions, share your thoughts and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Mar
26
Carl Hoffman will be promoting Savage Harvest
Carl Hoffman will be promoting Savage Harvest (added from HarperCollins)
Mar
26
Paul Betit: The Man in the Canal *at Longfellow Books*
Longfellow Books, Thursday, March 26 at 7pm
The Man in the Canal by Paul Betit Thursday, March 26th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books In the summer of 1971, Army CID investigator John Murphy goes undercover to find a murderer hiding among the U.S. military deserters who have taken refuge in Sweden during the Vietnam War. At the same time, Swedish police inspector Magnus Lund tries to learn the identity of a body found floating in the historic Göta Canal. The two investigators work independently until the thread of clues bring them together for an exciting climax. "Ok, now I’m hooked on John Murphy and Romana Alley. Will they get together? Where? When? And what kind of adventure is next for them? Retired sports writer Paul Betit’s third novel in a series, The Man in the Canal, is his best. I loved his first two books, but he’s really getting this novel writing down now. The Man in the Canal offers an intriguing plot, plenty of suspense, and a surprising finish. It moves right along. You won’t want to put it down." -George Smith "In this well-crafted and suspenseful mystery, Brunswick author Paul Betit taps into his 1960s military service in Vietnam as background for his tale. This is Betit’s third novel set overseas during the Vietnam War. It’s the best in the trilogy..." -Lloyd Ferris in the Maine Sunday Telegram A former Maine newspaperman, Mr. Betit is the author of three mystery-suspense novels featuring U.S. Army CID investigator John Murphy. A native of Augusta, Maine, Mr. Betit worked as a general assignment reporter or as a sportswriter for nearly 39 years, including stints with the Kennebec Journal (1974-85) in Augusta and the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram (1985-2013). In 1991 and 1996, he received awards from the Maine Press Association for sports feature writing. While working as an intelligence analyst in the U.S. Army, Mr. Betit served lengthy tours of duty in South Vietnam and Ethiopia. Join us for a reading with Paul, ask your questions and get your books signed! In the summer of 1971, Army CID investigator John Murphy goes undercover to find a murderer hiding among the U.S. military deserters who have taken refuge in Sweden during the Vietnam War. At the same time, Swedish police inspector Magnus Lund tries to learn the identity of a body found floating in the historic Göta Canal. The two investigators work independently until the thread of clues bring them together for an exciting climax. "Ok, now I’m hooked on John Murphy and Romana Alley. Will they get together? Where? When? And what kind of adventure is next for them? Retired sports writer Paul Betit’s third novel in a series, The Man in the Canal, is his best. I loved his first two books, but he’s really getting this novel writing down now. The Man in the Canal offers an intriguing plot, plenty of suspense, and a surprising finish. It moves right along. You won’t want to put it down." -George Smith "In this well-crafted and suspenseful mystery, Brunswick author Paul Betit taps into his 1960s military service in Vietnam as background for his tale. This is Betit’s third novel set overseas during the Vietnam War. It’s the best in the trilogy..." -Lloyd Ferris in the Maine Sunday Telegram A former Maine newspaperman, Mr. Betit is the author of three mystery-suspense novels featuring U.S. Army CID investigator John Murphy. A native of Augusta, Maine, Mr. Betit worked as a general assignment reporter or as a sportswriter for nearly 39 years, including stints with the Kennebec Journal (1974-85) in Augusta and the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram (1985-2013). In 1991 and 1996, he received awards from the Maine Press Association for sports feature writing. While working as an intelligence analyst in the U.S. Army, Mr. Betit served lengthy tours of duty in South Vietnam and Ethiopia. Join us for a reading with Paul, ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Apr
2
Jim Nichols: Closer All the Time *at Longfellow Books*
Longfellow Books, Thursday, April 2 at 7pm
Closer All the Time by Jim Nichols Thursday, April 2nd, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books

The inhabitants of Baxter, Maine, are going nowhere fast—but not for lack of trying. In this deftly written jewel of a novel, veteran author Jim Nichols strings together the bittersweet stories of several different characters bound together by shared geography and the insular nature of small-town life. There’s Johnny Lunden, a well-meaning war veteran with a penchant for the local bar and a deep but doomed love for his family. There’s eight-year-old Ted Soule, who shares a first kiss with the Ophelia-like Nadia, the daughter of his Russian neighbors, and Tomi Lambert who observes the confusion of the adults around her as they struggle with accepting their fates.

With the coastal waters of Maine as a backdrop, Nichols artfully explores the nature of connection—hoped for, missed, lost, and found—in Closer All the Time, that very special novel that delivers quick-moving, compelling storytelling with a lasting emotional wallop. You’ll devour it in one sitting, but its characters will linger at the edges of your day like memories of old friends and lovers.

“His men and boys become so real, I feel as if I know what it might have been like to grow up surrounded by brothers. Nichols is one of my favorite writers.” -bestselling author Monica Wood, When We Were the Kennedys Jim Nichols became interested in writing fiction while working as a ticket agent for a commuter airline in Rockland. Born in Brunswick and raised in Freeport, Maine, Nichols has worked variously as bartender, pilot, skycap, taxi driver, fence builder, orange picker, ramp and ticket agent for a commuter airline, travel agent and dispatcher for an air taxi service. His work has appeared in Esquire, Narrative, Zoetrope ASE, december, paris transcontinental (FR), From The Ashes (BR), elimae, Germ, The Clackamas Review, American Fiction, Downeast, River City, Conversely, and Night Train. He has been nominated several times for Pushcart prizes, and his novel, Hull Creek, was the runner-up for the 2012 Maine Book Award for Fiction. In addition to his prolific short story work, he is the author of two previously published works of fiction: Slow Monkeys and Hull Creek. His novel, Closer All the Time, will be released in March, 2015, from Islandport Press. Join us to hear the latest Maine story from Jim , ask your questions and get your books signed!

The inhabitants of Baxter, Maine, are going nowhere fast—but not for lack of trying. In this deftly written jewel of a novel, veteran author Jim Nichols strings together the bittersweet stories of several different characters bound together by shared geography and the insular nature of small-town life. There’s Johnny Lunden, a well-meaning war veteran with a penchant for the local bar and a deep but doomed love for his family. There’s eight-year-old Ted Soule, who shares a first kiss with the Ophelia-like Nadia, the daughter of his Russian neighbors, and Tomi Lambert who observes the confusion of the adults around her as they struggle with accepting their fates.

With the coastal waters of Maine as a backdrop, Nichols artfully explores the nature of connection—hoped for, missed, lost, and found—in Closer All the Time, that very special novel that delivers quick-moving, compelling storytelling with a lasting emotional wallop. You’ll devour it in one sitting, but its characters will linger at the edges of your day like memories of old friends and lovers.

“His men and boys become so real, I feel as if I know what it might have been like to grow up surrounded by brothers. Nichols is one of my favorite writers.” -bestselling author Monica Wood, When We Were the Kennedys Jim Nichols became interested in writing fiction while working as a ticket agent for a commuter airline in Rockland. Born in Brunswick and raised in Freeport, Maine, Nichols has worked variously as bartender, pilot, skycap, taxi driver, fence builder, orange picker, ramp and ticket agent for a commuter airline, travel agent and dispatcher for an air taxi service. His work has appeared in Esquire, Narrative, Zoetrope ASE, december, paris transcontinental (FR), From The Ashes (BR), elimae, Germ, The Clackamas Review, American Fiction, Downeast, River City, Conversely, and Night Train. He has been nominated several times for Pushcart prizes, and his novel, Hull Creek, was the runner-up for the 2012 Maine Book Award for Fiction. In addition to his prolific short story work, he is the author of two previously published works of fiction: Slow Monkeys and Hull Creek. His novel, Closer All the Time, will be released in March, 2015, from Islandport Press. Join us to hear the latest Maine story from Jim , ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Apr
11
Cape Elizabeth Author Fest
Cape Elizabeth High School, Saturday, April 11 at 10am
M.P. Barker and other New England children's authors will be selling and signing books at the Cape Elizabeth Author Fest.
This event is free and open to the public.
mending horses a difficult boy m. p. barker (mpbarker)
Apr
30
Nina MacLaughlin: Hammer Head *at Longfellow Books*
Longfellow Books, Thursday, April 30 at 7pm
Hammer head by Nina MacLaughlin Thursday, April 30th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books A warm and inspiring book for anyone who has ever dreamed of changing tracks: the story of a young woman who quit her desk job to become a carpenter. Nina MacLaughlin spent her twenties working at a Boston newspaper, sitting behind a desk and staring at a screen. Yearning for more tangible work, she applied for a job she saw on Craigslist—Carpenter’s Assistant: Women strongly encouraged to apply—despite being a Classics major who couldn't tell a Phillips from a flathead screwdriver. She got the job, and in Hammer head she tells the rich and entertaining story of becoming a carpenter.Writing with infectious curiosity, MacLaughlin describes the joys and frustrations of making things by hand, reveals the challenges of working as a woman in an occupation that is 99 percent male, and explains how manual labor changed the way she sees the world. We meet her unflappable mentor, Mary, a petite but tough carpenter-sage (“Be smarter than the tools!”), as well as wild demo dudes, foul-mouthed plumbers, grizzled hardware store clerks, and the colorful clients whose homes she and Mary work in. Whisking her readers from job to job—building a wall, remodeling a kitchen, gut-renovating a house—MacLaughlin examines the history of the tools she uses and the virtues and varieties of wood. Throughout, she draws on the wisdom of Ovid, Annie Dillard, Studs Terkel, and Mary Oliver to illuminate her experience of work. And, in a deeply moving climax, MacLaughlin strikes out on her own for the first time to build bookshelves for her own father. Hammer head is a passionate book full of sweat, swearing, bashed thumbs, and a deep sense of finding real meaning in work and life. “Not many of us find the courage to follow that small voice inside us to our true work, especially when that work lacks social status and health benefits and financial stability. But here, in this wonderfully assured debut, Nina MacLaughlin compellingly chronicles having done just that, a leap of faith that brings her more deeply into her very core where the stakes are high but the potential for lasting joy is even higher. Lucky for us, MacLaughlin's evocative prose is just as plumb, level, and true as all the wood structures she ultimately learns to build. This is a lovely and important book!” -Andre Dubus III “Hammer head is warm, wise, and authentically inspiring. No other book has made me want to re-read Ovid and retile my bathroom floor, nor given me the conviction that I can do both. I loved it.” -Rosie Schaap Nina MacLaughlin grew up in Massachusetts and lives in Cambridge, where she works as a carpenter. Formerly an editor at the Boston Phoenix, she has written for the Believer, Bookslut, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. Join us to learn more about Nina's transformation from journalist to carpenter , ask your questions and get your books signed! A warm and inspiring book for anyone who has ever dreamed of changing tracks: the story of a young woman who quit her desk job to become a carpenter. Nina MacLaughlin spent her twenties working at a Boston newspaper, sitting behind a desk and staring at a screen. Yearning for more tangible work, she applied for a job she saw on Craigslist—Carpenter’s Assistant: Women strongly encouraged to apply—despite being a Classics major who couldn't tell a Phillips from a flathead screwdriver. She got the job, and in Hammer head she tells the rich and entertaining story of becoming a carpenter.Writing with infectious curiosity, MacLaughlin describes the joys and frustrations of making things by hand, reveals the challenges of working as a woman in an occupation that is 99 percent male, and explains how manual labor changed the way she sees the world. We meet her unflappable mentor, Mary, a petite but tough carpenter-sage (“Be smarter than the tools!”), as well as wild demo dudes, foul-mouthed plumbers, grizzled hardware store clerks, and the colorful clients whose homes she and Mary work in. Whisking her readers from job to job—building a wall, remodeling a kitchen, gut-renovating a house—MacLaughlin examines the history of the tools she uses and the virtues and varieties of wood. Throughout, she draws on the wisdom of Ovid, Annie Dillard, Studs Terkel, and Mary Oliver to illuminate her experience of work. And, in a deeply moving climax, MacLaughlin strikes out on her own for the first time to build bookshelves for her own father. Hammer head is a passionate book full of sweat, swearing, bashed thumbs, and a deep sense of finding real meaning in work and life. “Not many of us find the courage to follow that small voice inside us to our true work, especially when that work lacks social status and health benefits and financial stability. But here, in this wonderfully assured debut, Nina MacLaughlin compellingly chronicles having done just that, a leap of faith that brings her more deeply into her very core where the stakes are high but the potential for lasting joy is even higher. Lucky for us, MacLaughlin's evocative prose is just as plumb, level, and true as all the wood structures she ultimately learns to build. This is a lovely and important book!” -Andre Dubus III “Hammer head is warm, wise, and authentically inspiring. No other book has made me want to re-read Ovid and retile my bathroom floor, nor given me the conviction that I can do both. I loved it.” -Rosie Schaap Nina MacLaughlin grew up in Massachusetts and lives in Cambridge, where she works as a carpenter. Formerly an editor at the Boston Phoenix, she has written for the Believer, Bookslut, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. Join us to learn more about Nina's transformation from journalist to carpenter , ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
May
1
Mary Lawrence
Sherman's Books & Stationery, Friday, May 1 at 6:30pm
Mary Lawrence (added from Random House)
May
28
Gerry Boyle: Once Burned *at Longfellow Books*
Longfellow Books, Thursday, May 28 at 7pm
Once Burned by Gerry Boyle Thursday, May 28th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books Life is briefly as it should be for Jack McMorrow: He and his wife Roxanne have retreated from the stress and danger of their day jobs to raise their daughter Sophie. But when development and arson threaten the nearby town of Sanctuary, and a crazy accident brings back mistakes from Roxanne’s past, Jack’s nose for crime leads him into a darker and deeply twisted tale. Something explosive is smoldering beneath the glossy facades and picturesque town square in Sanctuary, and the enemy is closer than he thinks. In Once Burned, the tenth installment of the internationally popular McMorrow series, Jack will take you along as he hunts a killer with a long memory and a very short fuse. Like many crime novelists, Gerry Boyle began his writing career in newspapers—the best training ground ever. After Colby College, he knocked around, including stints as a roofer, a postman, and a manuscript reader at a big New York publisher. His first reporting job was with a weekly in the paper mill town of Rumford, Maine. After a few months it was on to the (Waterville, Maine) Morning Sentinel, where editors learned early on that he worked best when left to his own devices. He wrote about stuff he saw in police stations, courtrooms, in the towns and cities of Maine. Deadline came out in 1993. With an assist from Robert B. Parker, he landed a top-flight literary agent and the books came steadily after that. McMorrow and Boyle grew up together, though at different rates. Join us to hear Gerry's latest, ask your questions and get your books signed! Life is briefly as it should be for Jack McMorrow: He and his wife Roxanne have retreated from the stress and danger of their day jobs to raise their daughter Sophie. But when development and arson threaten the nearby town of Sanctuary, and a crazy accident brings back mistakes from Roxanne’s past, Jack’s nose for crime leads him into a darker and deeply twisted tale. Something explosive is smoldering beneath the glossy facades and picturesque town square in Sanctuary, and the enemy is closer than he thinks. In Once Burned, the tenth installment of the internationally popular McMorrow series, Jack will take you along as he hunts a killer with a long memory and a very short fuse. Like many crime novelists, Gerry Boyle began his writing career in newspapers—the best training ground ever. After Colby College, he knocked around, including stints as a roofer, a postman, and a manuscript reader at a big New York publisher. His first reporting job was with a weekly in the paper mill town of Rumford, Maine. After a few months it was on to the (Waterville, Maine) Morning Sentinel, where editors learned early on that he worked best when left to his own devices. He wrote about stuff he saw in police stations, courtrooms, in the towns and cities of Maine. Deadline came out in 1993. With an assist from Robert B. Parker, he landed a top-flight literary agent and the books came steadily after that. McMorrow and Boyle grew up together, though at different rates. Join us to hear Gerry's latest, ask your questions and get your books signed! Like many crime novelists, Gerry Boyle began his writing career in newspapers—the best training ground ever. After Colby College, he knocked around, including stints as a roofer, a postman, and a manuscript reader at a big New York publisher. His first reporting job was with a weekly in the paper mill town of Rumford, Maine. After a few months it was on to the (Waterville, Maine) Morning Sentinel, where editors learned early on that he worked best when left to his own devices. He wrote about stuff he saw in police stations, courtrooms, in the towns and cities of Maine. Deadline came out in 1993. With an assist from Robert B. Parker, he landed a top-flight literary agent and the books came steadily after that. McMorrow and Boyle grew up together, though at different rates. Join us to hear Gerry's latest, ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Jun
25
Lou Ureneck: The Great Fire *at Longfellow Books*
Longfellow Books, Thursday, June 25 at 7pm
The Great Fire by Lou Ureneck Thursday, June 25th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books

The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians—a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide’s centennial. The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay. With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people. By turns harrowing and inspiring, The Great Fire uses eyewitness accounts, documents, and survivor narratives to bring this episode—extraordinary for its brutality as well as its heroism—to life. "Ureneck's account is magisterial in its portrait of the personalities involved, and it charts equally well the densely intertwined currents of history as his narrative gathers speed ... a tragic but very moving story." -Robert Shenk, author of America's Black Sea Fleet Lou Ureneck is a teacher and writer. He lives in Boston. His first book, "Backcast," won the National Outdoor Book Award for literary merit. He has worked as a reporter and editor at the Providence Journal, the Portland (Maine) Press Herald and the Philadelphia Inquirer. He also has been a merchant seaman and carpenter. Ureneck also was a Nieman fellow and editor-in-residence at Harvard University. He built a cabin in Maine with his brother, Paul,and wrote about the experience in his 2011 book Cabin. Join us for a reading with Lou to celebrate his latest book, ask your questions and get your books signed!

The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians—a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide’s centennial. The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay. With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people. By turns harrowing and inspiring, The Great Fire uses eyewitness accounts, documents, and survivor narratives to bring this episode—extraordinary for its brutality as well as its heroism—to life. "Ureneck's account is magisterial in its portrait of the personalities involved, and it charts equally well the densely intertwined currents of history as his narrative gathers speed ... a tragic but very moving story." -Robert Shenk, author of America's Black Sea Fleet Lou Ureneck is a teacher and writer. He lives in Boston. His first book, "Backcast," won the National Outdoor Book Award for literary merit. He has worked as a reporter and editor at the Providence Journal, the Portland (Maine) Press Herald and the Philadelphia Inquirer. He also has been a merchant seaman and carpenter. Ureneck also was a Nieman fellow and editor-in-residence at Harvard University. He built a cabin in Maine with his brother, Paul,and wrote about the experience in his 2011 book Cabin. Join us for a reading with Lou to celebrate his latest book, ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
3
John Connolly
Naples Public Library, Tuesday, November 3 at unknown time
John Connolly is the author of The Wrath of Angels, The Burning Soul, The Book of Lost Things, and Bad Men, among many others. He is a regular contributor to The Irish Times and lives in Dublin, Ireland. For more information, see his website at JohnConnollyBooks.com, or follow him on Twitter @JConnollyBooks. (added from Simon & Schuster)
Nov
4
John Connolly
Books-A-Million #851 - South Portland, ME, Wednesday, November 4 at 6pm
John Connolly is the author of The Wrath of Angels, The Burning Soul, The Book of Lost Things, and Bad Men, among many others. He is a regular contributor to The Irish Times and lives in Dublin, Ireland. For more information, see his website at JohnConnollyBooks.com, or follow him on Twitter @JConnollyBooks. (added from Simon & Schuster)
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