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Location: Scarborough, Ontario

Little Libraries

There are 11 "Little Libraries" within 25 miles.

Local venues

300 Borough Drive, Unit 82, Scarborough, Ontario M1P 4P5 Canada
Kennedy Commons, 20 William Kitchen Road, Scarborough, Ontario M1P 5B7 Canada
45 Milner Ave, Toronto, ON M1S 3P6 Canada
The Comic Room (1.4 miles)
659 McCowan Rd, Toronto, ON Canada
Jamie Fraser Books (1.4 miles)
34 Dundalk Dr, Scarborough, BC M1P 4W3 Canada
659 McCowan Rd, Scarborough, Ontario M1J 1K2 Canada
941 Progress Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M1G 3T8 Canada
1515 Danforth Rd., Toronto, Ontario M1J 1H5 Canada
1081 Progress Ave., Toronto, Ontario M1B 5Z6 Canada
3850 Sheppard Aveune East, Toronto, Ontario M1T 3L4 Canada
3850 Sheppard Aveune East, Toronto, Ontario M1T 3L4 Canada
155 Bonis Ave., Toronto, Ontario M1T 3W6 Canada
545 Markham Rd., Toronto, Ontario M1H 2A1 Canada
2219 Lawrence Ave. East, Toronto, ON M1P 2P5 Canada
1571 Sandhurst Circle (Woodside Square Mall), Toronto, ON M1V 1V2 Canada
3290 Midland Ave, Toronto, ON M1V 3Z9 Canada
2380 Eglinton Ave. East (Liberty Square Shopping Plaza), Toronto, Ontario M1K 2P3 Canada
85 Ellesmere Rd. (Parkway Mall), Toronto, ON M1R 4B9 Canada
30 Sewells Rd., Toronto, ON M1B 3G5 Canada
Brimley Book Store (3.3 miles)
3833 Midland, Toronto, Ontario M1V 5L6 Canada
755 Morningside Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M1C 5J9 Canada
123 Guildwood Parkway (Guildwood Plaza), Toronto, Ontario M1E 4V2 Canada
75 Ashtonbee Road, Toronto, Ontario M1L 4N4 Canada
210 Brookbanks Dr., Toronto, Ontario M3A 2T8 Canada
2900 Warden Ave. (Bridlewood Mall), Toronto, Ontario M1W 2S8 Canada

Local events

Oct
31
ROUND TABLE: Women & War
International Festival of Authors, Friday, October 31 at 7:30pm
Four talented authors discuss writing about WWI from a female perspective. Charlotte Gray will moderate.

Charlotte Gray is one of Canada’s preeminent biographers and historians. She is the recipient of many awards and is a Member of the Order of Canada. Gray presents her latest work of non-fiction, The Massey Murder: A Maid, Her Master and the Trial that Shocked a Country, which was shortlisted for the RBC Taylor Prize. The book tells the sensational true story of Carrie Davies, the maid who shot a member of one of Canada’s wealthiest families in 1915.

Anna Hope studied English at Oxford, attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts and then received an MA in creative writing at Birkbeck. She lives in London. Hope presents her debut novel, Wake, which tells the story of three very different women who try to find ways to live again after devastating losses endured during WWI.

Frances Itani is the author of 16 books, including Deafening, which won a Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and was shortlisted for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. She is a three-time winner of the CBC Literary Award and is a Member of the Order of Canada. Itani presents her 2014 Scotiabank Giller Prize longlisted novel, Tell, an extraordinary tour-de-force about secrets withheld and secrets revealed in the aftermath of the First Great War.

Kate Pullinger is the author of 10 novels, including The Mistress of Nothing, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction. Her prize-winning digital fiction projects Inanimate Alice and Flight Paths: A Networked Novel have reached audiences around the world. Born in Cranbrook, BC, she is currently Professor of Creative Writing and Digital Media at Bath Spa University. Pullinger presents Landing Gear, a highly imaginative story of colliding worlds and extraordinary connections. Inspired by real-life accounts of airplane stowaways, the novel chronicles the complex texture of modern life.

Johanna Skibsrud is the award-winning author of two collections of poetry and one short story collection, This Will Be Difficult to Explain and Other Stories. Her debut novel, The Sentimentalists, was awarded the 2010 Scotiabank Giller Prize. Skibsrud presents her latest novel, Quartet for the End of Time. Set in 1932, it is a profound mediation on human nature that follows embittered WWI veterans who march on Washington to demand their wartime bonus.

Friday, October 31, 2014 - 7:30 PM
Lakeside Terrace, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)… (more)
Oct
31
READING: Lee Henderson, Eliza Robertson, Miriam Toews and Kathleen Winter
International Festival of Authors, Friday, October 31 at 7:30pm
Writers Lee Henderson, Eliza Robertson, Miriam Toews and Kathleen Winter read from their most recent works. This event will be hosted by Tanis Rideout.

Lee Henderson is the author of the award-winning short story collection The Broken Record Technique. He is a contributing editor to the arts magazines Border Crossings in Canada and Contemporary in the UK, and has published fiction and art criticism in numerous periodicals. His first novel, The Man Game, won the BC Book Prize for Fiction and was shortlisted for the Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize. Henderson presents his latest novel, The Road Narrows as You Go, a bright, rollicking, unflinching portrait of the 1980s and of a young woman struggling to find her place.

Eliza Robertson studied creative writing at the University of Victoria, then pursued her MA in prose fiction at the University of East Anglia, where she received a Man Booker Scholarship and the Curtis Brown Prize for best writer. She was a finalist for the 2013 CBC Short Story Prize, won the Commonwealth Short Story Prize for "We Walked on Water," and her short story "My Sister Sang" was shortlisted for the 2013 Journey Prize. Robertson presents her debut collection, Wallflowers, a quirky and masterful bouquet that smashes stereotypes and shows us remarkable new ways of experiencing the world.

Miriam Toews is the author of five previous novels: Summer of My Amazing Luck, A Boy of Good Breeding, A Complicated Kindness (winner of the 2004 Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction), The Flying Troutmans (winner of the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize) and Irma Voth, and one work of non-fiction, Swing Low: A Life. She presents All My Puny Sorrows, the riveting story of two sisters, Elf and Yoli. This at once tender and unquiet novel offers a profound reflection on the limits of love, and the sometimes unimaginable challenges we experience when childhood becomes a new country of adult commitments and responsibilities.

Kathleen Winter's debut novel, Annabel, was shortlisted for the Orange Prize, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the three biggest fiction prizes in Canada. It won the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award and an Independent Literary Award, and was a 2014 Canada Reads selection. Her first story collection, boYs, also won numerous Canadian awards. At our Biblioasis anniversary event, she presents The Freedom in American Songs, her new story collection about modern loneliness, small-town gay teenagers, catastrophic love, inappropriate laughter and the holiness of ordinary life. At the Festival, Winter presents both the story collection and her first work of non-fiction, Boundless, which was recently shortlisted for the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction. It is a powerful homage to the ever-evolving and magnetic power of the North.

Friday, October 31, 2014 - 7:30 PM
Brigantine Room, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Oct
31
RBC Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction Spotlight: We Were Here First
International Festival of Authors, Friday, October 31 at 7:30pm
The 2014 winner of the prestigious RBC Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction, Thomas King, sits down for a riveting panel discussion with Aboriginal writers Lee Maracle and Ellen van Neerven about Indigenous writing traditions and contemporary Indigenous literature. CBC’s Waubgeshig Rice moderates.

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its art funding and advisory body, and the Melbourne Writers Festival.

Thomas King is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, scriptwriter and photographer of Cherokee and Greek descent. For 50 years, he has worked as an activist for Native causes and has taught Native literature and history at universities across North America. He was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2004, and has been nominated for two Governor General’s Literary Awards. King presents both his RBC Taylor Prize-winning book, The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America, and his first literary novel in 15 years, The Back of the Turtle.

Lee Maracle has been published in anthologies and scholarly journals worldwide, and is the author of a number of critically acclaimed novels and works of non-fiction. She was born in North Vancouver and is a member of the Stó:lō Nation. She is currently an instructor at both the University of Toronto and Banff Centre for the Arts, and has received the Diamond Jubilee Medal for her work promoting writing among Aboriginal youth. Maracle presents her latest novel, Celia’s Song, which chronicles one Native family’s harrowing experiences over several generations, after the brutality, interference and neglect resulting from contact with Europeans.

Ellen van Neerven is a writer of Aboriginal and Dutch descent whose work has appeared in many publications, including The Best of McSweeney’s, Voiceworks and Review of Australian Fiction. She currently lives in Brisbane where she works as an editor for the black&write! project at the State Library of Queensland. Van Neerven presents her debut novel and the winner of the 2013 David Unaipon Award, Heat and Light. Divided into three sections, it is inspired by the intersection of familial history, location and identity, and takes readers on a journey that is mythical, mystical and still achingly real.

Friday, October 31, 2014 - 7:30 PM
Studio Theatre, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
Cundill Prize in History: Discussing Processes in Non-Fiction
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 2pm
The Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill (Cundill Prize) was established in 2008 to recognize and promote literary and academic achievement in history. The award is offered each year by McGill University to an individual, of any nationality and from any country, who has published a book determined to have had (or likely to have) a profound literary, social and academic impact in the area of history.

Join Stephen R. Platt, the winner of the 2012 Cundill Prize for his book Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, the West, and the Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War, and Marla Miller, the 2010 Cundill Prize runner-up for her book Betsy Ross and the Making of America and a 2014 juror, for a conversation about the experience of writing historical non-fiction. Christopher Manfredi hosts and moderates.

Christopher Manfredi is Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Faculty of Arts at McGill University. He is an authority on the role of the judiciary in democratic societies. His research focuses on political institutions, the political impact of rights litigation and the dynamics of constitutional change. He is the author of a number of books, including Feminist Activism in the Supreme Court: Legal Mobilization and the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund, which won the Canadian Law and Society Association’s annual Best Book Prize and was shortlisted for the Donner Prize.

Marla Miller is a Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and directs the Public History programme. She has won the Organization of American Historians’ Lerner-Scott Prize for the best dissertation in Women’s History and the Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Colonial History. Miller presents Betsy Ross and the Making of America, a finalist for the Cundill Prize in History at McGill University. A scholarly biography of the much-misunderstood early American craftswoman who created the American flag, Betsy Ross pieces together the fascinating life of this beloved figure.

Stephen R. Platt received his PhD in Chinese history at Yale and teaches Chinese history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is the author of Provincial Patriots: The Hunanese and Modern China. His work has been supported by the Fulbright programme, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation. Platt presents his 2012 Cundill Prize-winning book, Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, the West, and the Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War, in which he recounts the 19th-century Taiping conflict in China, perhaps the bloodiest civil war of all time.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 2:00 PM
Brigantine Room, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)… (more)
Nov
1
ROUND TABLE: How We Live Now
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 2pm
The past and the present. Fiction and fact. The told and the untold. All have ways of merging and blending, of blurring the landscapes of our modern Canadian life. From the Battle of the Somme to the reflections of an elderly athlete, Canadian storytellers remind us how we’re shaped not only by our contemporary lives, but by the past of our country. Hosted and moderated by Brian Francis.

Dionne Brand is a poet and novelist and was Toronto’s third Poet Laureate from 2009–2012. Her most recent book of poetry, Ossuaries, won the Griffin Poetry Prize, and her literary honours include the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award and the 2006 Harbourfront Festival Prize for her contribution to the world of books and writing. She presents her latest novel, Love Enough, about the love between lovers, friends and for the places we live in. It is a profoundly modern work that speaks to the most fundamental questions of how we live now.

Brian Francis’ most recent novel, Natural Order, was selected by the Toronto Star, Kobo and Georgia Straight as a Best Book of 2011. His first novel, Fruit, was a 2009 Canada Reads finalist.

Joseph Kertes was born in Hungary, but escaped with his family to Canada after the revolution of 1956. His first novel, Winter Tulips, won the Stephen Leacock Award for Humour. His third novel, Gratitude, won a Canadian Jewish Book Award and the U.S. National Jewish Book Award for Fiction. Kertes founded Humber College’s distinguished creative writing and comedy programmes, and is currently the dean of creative and performing arts. He presents The Afterlife of Stars. An intimate and compelling novel of revolution and family, it is about fathers and sons and the tearing down of idols.

Carrie Snyder is the author of two books of short fiction. Her first, Hair Hat, was shortlisted for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award for short fiction, and her second, The Juliet Stories, was a finalist for the 2012 Governor General's Literary Award. Snyder lives in Waterloo, Ontario and blogs as Obscure CanLit Mama. She presents Girl Runner. Part historical page-turner, part contemporary mystery, it is an engaging and endearing story about family, ambition, athletics and the dedicated pursuit of one’s passions.

Michael Winter is the author of numerous acclaimed novels, including The Architects are Here, which was longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and The Death of Donna Whalen, which was nominated for the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize. He is also the recipient of the Writers' Trust Notable Author Award. Winter presents his non-fiction debut, Into the Blizzard: Walking the Fields of the Newfoundland Dead, a uniquely gripping account of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment who were all but annihilated 100 years ago during the Battle of the Somme in World War I.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 2:00 PM
Fleck Dance Theatre, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)… (more)
Nov
1
READING/INTERVIEW: Anna Hope and Sarah Waters
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 2:30pm
Writers Anna Hope and Sarah Waters read from and discuss their latest works with Carol Off.

Anna Hope studied English at Oxford, attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts and then received an MA in creative writing at Birkbeck. She lives in London. Hope presents her debut novel, Wake, which tells the story of three very different women who try to find ways to live again after devastating losses endured during WWI.

Carol Off has been a host of CBC Radio’s As It Happens since 2006. Previously a documentary reporter for The National, she has extensive experience in both Canadian and international current affairs. Off is the author of several bestselling books of non-fiction, including The Ghosts of Medak Pocket: The Story of Canada’s Secret War, which won the prestigious Dafoe Foundation Award. She is also the recipient of numerous awards for her television and radio work, among them a Gemini and two gold medals from the New York Festival of Television.

Sarah Waters is the bestselling author of five previous novels: Tipping the Velvet, Affinity, Fingersmith, The Night Watch and The Little Stranger. Winner of many literary awards, she has been shortlisted for both the Man Booker Prize and the Orange Prize. She lives in London. Waters presents The Paying Guests, a masterful novel of brilliant storytelling, sensuality and psychological suspense set in post-WWI England.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 2:30 PM
Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Event location: Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8
Nov
1
READING: Dionne Brand, Frances Itani, Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer and Kate Pullinger
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 3pm
Writers Dionne Brand, Frances Itani, Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer and Kate Pullinger read from their latest works. Ania Szado hosts.

Dionne Brand is a poet and novelist and was Toronto’s third Poet Laureate from 2009–2012. Her most recent book of poetry, Ossuaries, won the Griffin Poetry Prize, and her literary honours include the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Trillium Book Award and the 2006 Harbourfront Festival Prize for her contribution to the world of books and writing. She presents her latest novel, Love Enough, about the love between lovers, friends and for the places we live in. It is a profoundly modern work that speaks to the most fundamental questions of how we live now.

Frances Itani is the author of 16 books, including Deafening, which won a Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and was shortlisted for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. She is a three-time winner of the CBC Literary Award and is a Member of the Order of Canada. Itani presents her 2014 Scotiabank Giller Prize longlisted novel, Tell, an extraordinary tour-de-force about secrets withheld and secrets revealed in the aftermath of the First Great War.

Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer is the author of the novels Perfecting and The Nettle Spinner, as well as the story collection Way Up, which won the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. She is also an award-winning instructor with the University of Toronto’s School of Continuing Studies. Her short fiction has been published in Granta, The Walrus, Numéro Cinq, Joyland and Storyville. Kuitenbrouwer presents All the Broken Things, a spellbinding novel of exceptional heart and imagination about the ties that bind us to each other.

Kate Pullinger is the author of 10 novels, including The Mistress of Nothing, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction. Her prize-winning digital fiction projects Inanimate Alice and Flight Paths: A Networked Novel have reached audiences around the world. Born in Cranbrook, BC, she is currently Professor of Creative Writing and Digital Media at Bath Spa University. Pullinger presents Landing Gear, a highly imaginative story of colliding worlds and extraordinary connections. Inspired by real-life accounts of airplane stowaways, the novel chronicles the complex texture of modern life.

In 2014, CBC called Ania Szado one of "Ten Canadian Women You Need to Read." Her short fiction has been nominated for the Journey Prize and the National Magazine Awards, and her bestselling novel Studio Saint-Ex has received international acclaim. Szado's debut novel, Beginning of Was, was regionally shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 3:00 PM
Lakeside Terrace, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
ROUND TABLE: Tough Times
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 3pm
Four celebrated Canadian authors reflect on life, death and the human struggle, and the challenges of capturing these accurately and compassionately in their fiction. Farzana Doctor hosts and moderates.

Caroline Adderson is the acclaimed author of three novels, two collections of short stories and a number of books for young readers. She is the winner of two Ethel Wilson Fiction Prizes and three CBC Literary Awards. She was also the recipient of the 2006 Marian Engel Award for mid-career achievement. Adderson presents her fourth novel, Ellen in Pieces, a genre-bending story of a woman who, in the last year of her life, begins to explore love and the possibility of recovery from regret.

Martha Baillie is the author of four novels. Her most recent, The Incident Report, was longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and was included in The Globe and Mail’s list of Best Books for 2009. She has written about contemporary visual art for the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Koffler Gallery and Brick magazine. Her poetry has appeared in several Canadian journals. Baillie presents The Search for Heinrich Schlögel. Her hypnotic new novel follows the titular character from Germany to Canada, where he sets out on a two-week hike into the isolated interior of Baffin Island.

Farzana Doctor’s first novel, Stealing Nasreen, received critical acclaim and was nominated for Masala!Mehndi!Masti! People’s Choice Award. She has also written on social work and diversity-related topics, and in her spare time she provides private practice consulting and psychotherapy services. Doctor's most recent novel, Six Metres of Pavement, is about a man who struggles to continue living after his daughter’s tragic death. Things begin to change, however, when he befriends two very different women: a young queer activist and his grieving Portuguese-Canadian neighbour.

Miriam Toews is the author of five previous novels: Summer of My Amazing Luck, A Boy of Good Breeding, A Complicated Kindness (winner of the 2004 Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction), The Flying Troutmans (winner of the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize) and Irma Voth, and one work of non-fiction, Swing Low: A Life. She presents All My Puny Sorrows, the riveting story of two sisters, Elf and Yoli. This at once tender and unquiet novel offers a profound reflection on the limits of love, and the sometimes unimaginable challenges we experience when childhood becomes a new country of adult commitments and responsibilities.

Rudy Wiebe is a novelist, short story writer and essayist. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction for both The Temptations of Big Bear and for A Discovery of Strangers, as well as the RBC Taylor Prize for his memoir, Of This Earth. Weibe is also an Officer of the Order of Canada. He presents his first novel in 11 years, the lyrical masterwork Come Back. Inspired by his life, it is a rare and beautiful novel about the humanity of living and dying.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 3:00 PM
Studio Theatre, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
ROUND TABLE: Over There
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 4pm
Three award-winning writers weigh in on the WWI Canadian experience, both on the homefront and across the ocean. Charlotte Gray hosts and moderates.

J.L. Granatstein is Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus in the department of History at York University. His scholarship has won numerous awards, including the J.B. Tyrrell Historical Medal, the Vimy Award and the Pierre Berton Award. In 1996, he became an Officer of the Order of Canada. Granatstein has received honorary degrees from the University of Western Ontario, the University of Calgary and McMaster University, among others. He presents The Greatest Victory: Canada’s One Hundred Days, 1918. This fascinating narrative tells the story of the Canada-led offensive that began on August 8, 1918 and ended with Armistice on November 11.

Charlotte Gray is one of Canada’s preeminent biographers and historians. She is the recipient of many awards and is a Member of the Order of Canada. Gray presents her latest work of non-fiction, The Massey Murder: A Maid, Her Master and the Trial that Shocked a Country, which was shortlisted for the RBC Taylor Prize. The book tells the sensational true story of Carrie Davies, the maid who shot a member of one of Canada’s wealthiest families in 1915.

David Macfarlane has won numerous National Magazine and National Newspaper Awards. His novel Summer Gone was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and won the Chapters/Books in Canada First Novel Award. His most recent novel, The Figures of Beauty, was met with great acclaim. He currently writes a weekly column in the Toronto Star. Macfarlane presents his memoir, The Danger Tree: Memory, War, and the Search for a Family's Past, which won the Canadian Authors Association Award for Non-Fiction. Weaving together the major events of the 20th century in Newfoundland, Macfarlane brings this storied region to life with wit, insight and affection.

Michael Winter is the author of numerous acclaimed novels, including The Architects are Here, which was longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and The Death of Donna Whalen, which was nominated for the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize. He is also the recipient of the Writers' Trust Notable Author Award. Winter presents his non-fiction debut, Into the Blizzard: Walking the Fields of the Newfoundland Dead, a uniquely gripping account of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment who were all but annihilated 100 years ago during the Battle of the Somme in World War I.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 4:00 PM
Brigantine Room, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
In Conversation with David Nicholls
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 4:30pm
David Nicholls, the author of the bestselling love story One Day, discusses his Man Booker-longlisted new novel, Us, with Bert Archer. The book offers a clever and authentic meditation on marriage and family today.

Bert Archer is a writer for the National Post, The Globe and Mail, Hazlitt, Toronto Life and Yonge Street Media. He was a full-time book reviewer and literary journalist in Canada and the USA for the better part of a decade. He has written one book and contributed to half a dozen others. Archer also spent this past April visiting the battlefields of Nord-Pas de Calais and Normandy, and July retracing the first war's first steps in the Balkans.

David Nicholls is the author of the bestselling One Day, adapted into a film staring Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgess. Trained as an actor before making the switch to writing, Nicholls’s previous novels include Starter for Ten, which was adapted into a film starring James McAvoy, and The Understudy. Nicholls presents his latest novel, Us, a witty and authentic meditation on what holds marriages and families together—and what we learn about ourselves when everything falls apart.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 4:30 PM
Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
READING: Charles Foran, Lee Henderson, Diane Schoemperlen and Kim Thúy
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 5pm
Writers Charles Foran, Lee Henderson, Diane Schoemperlen and Kim Thúy read from their latest works. Alissa York hosts.

Charles Foran is an award-winning journalist and the author of 10 books, including four previous novels. His biography Mordecai: The Life and Times won the RBC Taylor Prize, the Governor General’s Award, the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Literary Nonfiction and the Helen and Stan Vine Canadian Jewish Book Award. Foran presents Planet Lolita. Told in the voice of a bi-racial girl and the language of social media, it is a riveting novel of desires and consequences in the unfolding digital age in Hong Kong.

Lee Henderson is the author of the award-winning short story collection The Broken Record Technique. He is a contributing editor to the arts magazines Border Crossings in Canada and Contemporary in the UK, and has published fiction and art criticism in numerous periodicals. His first novel, The Man Game, won the BC Book Prize for Fiction and was shortlisted for the Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize. Henderson presents his latest novel, The Road Narrows as You Go, a bright, rollicking, unflinching portrait of the 1980s and of a young woman struggling to find her place.

Diane Schoemperlen has published several collections of short fiction and three novels. Her short story collection The Man of My Dreams was shortlisted for both the Governor General’s Award and the Trillium Book Award. In 2008, she received the Marian Engel Award from the Writers’ Trust of Canada. Schoemperlen presents By the Book: Stories and Pictures, a sequel to her Governor General’s Award-winning Forms of Devotion, in which she pieces together fragments from old encyclopedias in the form of verbal and visual collage, breathing new life into the old forgotten texts.

Kim Thúy has worked as a seamstress, interpreter, lawyer and restaurant owner. Her debut novel, Ru, won the Governor General’s Award for French-Language Fiction, and the English edition was shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Thúy presents Mãn, a mystery about a woman who, upon discovering that she is a natural chef, creates dishes that are suffused with memory and emotion.

Alissa York’s internationally acclaimed novels include Mercy, Effigy (shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize) and, most recently, Fauna (shortlisted for the Toronto Book Award). She is also the author of the short fiction collection Any Given Power, from which stories have won the Journey Prize and the Bronwen Wallace Award. Her essays and articles have appeared in such periodicals as The Guardian, The Globe and Mail, Quill & Quire, Eighteen Bridges and Canadian House and Home. York has lived all over Canada and now makes her home in Toronto with her husband, artist Clive Holden.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 5:00 PM
Studio Theatre, 235 Queens Quay West. Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
READING: Steven Galloway, Aislinn Hunter, Lee Maracle and Carrie Snyder
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 5pm
Writers Steven Galloway, Aislinn Hunter, Lee Maracle and Carrie Snyder read from their latest works.

Steven Galloway is the author of Finnie Walsh, Ascension and the bestselling novel The Cellist of Sarajevo. He lives with his wife and two young daughters in British Columbia, and teaches creative writing at UBC and SFUH. Galloway presents his latest novel, The Confabulist, a brilliant story about fame and ambition that uses the sudden death of Harry Houdini to weave a magical tale of intrigue, love and illusion.

Aislinn Hunter’s acclaimed collection of stories, What's Left Us, was a finalist for the Danuta Gleed Award and the ReLit Award, and her poetry, Into the Early Hours, was shortlisted for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize and won the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award. Hunter’s novel Stay was a finalist for the Amazon.ca First Novel Award and was recently adapted for film. She presents The World Before Us, her first book of fiction in 12 years. It is a riveting exploration of the repercussions of small acts, the power of affection and the irrepressible vitality of everyday objects and events.

Lee Maracle has been published in anthologies and scholarly journals worldwide, and is the author of a number of critically acclaimed novels and works of non-fiction. She was born in North Vancouver and is a member of the Stó:lō Nation. She is currently an instructor at both the University of Toronto and Banff Centre for the Arts, and has received the Diamond Jubilee Medal for her work promoting writing among Aboriginal youth. Maracle presents her latest novel, Celia’s Song, which chronicles one Native family’s harrowing experiences over several generations, after the brutality, interference and neglect resulting from contact with Europeans.

Poet Jacob McArthur Mooney's last collection, Folk, was shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize and the Trillium Book Award in Poetry. He curates and hosts the bi-weekly Pivot Reading Series in Toronto.

Carrie Snyder is the author of two books of short fiction. Her first, Hair Hat, was shortlisted for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award for short fiction, and her second, The Juliet Stories, was a finalist for the 2012 Governor General's Literary Award. Snyder lives in Waterloo, Ontario and blogs as Obscure CanLit Mama. She presents Girl Runner. Part historical page-turner, part contemporary mystery, it is an engaging and endearing story about family, ambition, athletics and the dedicated pursuit of one’s passions.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 5:00 PM
Lakeside Terrace, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)… (more)
Nov
1
ROUND TABLE: Setting the Story
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 7:30pm
Three award-winning authors discuss their most recent novels, in which the setting factors as significantly as the characters. Lewis DeSoto will host and moderate.

David Bergen is the award-winning author of eight novels, including The Time in Between, winner of the 2005 Scotiabank Giller Prize, The Matter with Morris, shortlisted for both the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and the bestselling The Age of Hope, a finalist for CBC Canada Reads in 2013. Bergen presents Leaving Tomorrow, an emotionally powerful story about a hopeful young man who yearns for a larger life outside of his small town in Alberta.

Lewis DeSoto's latest novel is The Restoration Artist. An artist as well as a writer, he has exhibited his paintings across Canada. A former editor of the Literary Review of Canada, DeSoto has published essays and short stories in numerous journals, and he was awarded the Books in Canada/Writers’ Union Short Prose Award. His novel A Blade of Grass was nominated for the Man Booker Prize, the Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje Prize and the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. He is also the author of a biography of Emily Carr, part of the Extraordinary Canadians series.

Christos Tsiolkas is an author, playwright, essayist and screenwriter. His novel The Slap won the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize, the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal and the Vance Palmer Prize for Fiction, and was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Tsiolkas presents his fifth novel, Barracuda, a moving story about a talented young swimmer’s struggle towards maturity.

Richard Wagamese is the author of 12 previous novels, including Keeper'n Me and Indian Horse, a recent Canada Reads finalist. He is also the author of several acclaimed memoirs, including the bestselling One Native Life and One Story, One Song, which won the George Ryga Award for Social Awareness in Literature. He leads writing and storytelling workshops across the country, and makes frequent appearances as a speaker. Wagamese presents Medicine Walk. Set in the dramatic landscape of the BC Interior, it is a novel about love, friendship, courage and the idea that the land has within it powers of healing.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 7:30 PM
Studio Theatre, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
ROUND TABLE: October 1970
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 7:30pm
Three books that explore the October Crisis and the effects of the FLQ are discussed by their Canadian authors. Marc Côté hosts and moderates.

Marc Côté is the publisher of Cormorant Books, a literary house noted for the discovery and development of Canadian writing talent and the publishing of Québécois fiction translated into English. He has won the Libris Award for Editor of the Year twice. Cormorant has won the Libris Award for Small Press three times in their eight nominations over the past 12 years. At Cormorant, Marc has acquired and edited many award-nominated books.

Catherine Gildiner's childhood memoir Too Close to the Falls was a New York Times and Globe and Mail bestseller. The sequel, After the Falls, was also a bestseller, and her novel, Seduction, was published to international acclaim. She presents the third and final volume of her memoir series, Coming Ashore. Picking up her story in the late ’60s at age 21, Gildiner determinedly blazes her own trail through all the passion and uncertainty that comes with the cusp of adulthood.

John McFetridge is the author of Dirty Sweet, Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere and Swap. He became fascinated with crime while attending a murder trial at age 12 with his police officer brother. McFetridge has also co-written a short story collection, Below the Line, and wrote for the CBS/CTV television series The Bridge. He lives in Toronto with his family. He presents Black Rock, an artfully told police procedural set in Montreal in 1970. Set against actual historical events, it is both a compelling page-turner and an accomplished novel.

Claire Holden Rothman is the author of two story collections and a bestselling novel, The Heart Specialist, longlisted for the 2009 Scotiabank Giller Prize and published in six countries. Her translation of Canada’s first novel, L’influence d’un livre (The Influence of a Book) by Philippe-Ignace François Aubert de Gaspé, won the John Glassco Translation Prize. She lives in Montreal with playwright Arthur Holden. Rothman presents her 2014 Scotiabank Giller Prize longlisted novel, My October, a masterful tale of a modern family torn apart by the power of language and the weight of history.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 7:30 PM
Lakeside Terrace. 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
READING: David Adams Richards, Emma Donoghue, Thomas King and Jacob Scheier
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 7:30pm
Accomplished writers David Adams Richards, Emma Donoghue, Thomas King and Jacob Scheier read from their latest works. Katrina Onstad hosts.

Emma Donoghue is a writer of contemporary and historical fiction whose eight novels include the internationally bestselling Room—winner of both the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Canada and Caribbean Region) and the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the Man Booker Prize—as well as Slammerkin, Life Mask and The Sealed Letter. She lives in London, Ontario with her partner and their two children. Donoghue presents her latest novel, Frog Music, a lyrical tale of love and bloodshed among lowlifes in San Francisco in 1876.

Thomas King is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, scriptwriter and photographer of Cherokee and Greek descent. For 50 years, he has worked as an activist for Native causes and has taught Native literature and history at universities across North America. He was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2004, and has been nominated for two Governor General’s Literary Awards. King presents both his RBC Taylor Prize-winning book, The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America, and his first literary novel in 15 years, The Back of the Turtle.

Katrina Onstad's bestselling second novel, Everybody Has Everything, was nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Toronto Book Award. She is an award-winning journalist who lives in Toronto and works in Drama at CBC TV.

David Adams Richards is the author of numerous acclaimed works of fiction and non-fiction. Among his recent work, The Lost Highway was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction and nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize. The Friends of Meager Fortune won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best Book, while Mercy Among the Children won the Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Trillium Award. He presents Crimes Against My Brother, a brilliant, heartbreaking novel that tackles the theme of debt and what we owe each other.

Jacob Scheier is a poet and journalist from Toronto. His debut collection, More To Keep Us Warm, won the 2008 Governor General’s Award for English-language poetry. Scheier’s poems have been published in literary journals and magazines across North America, including Descant, Geist and Rattle, and have been heard on CBC Radio. He presents his latest collection, Letter from Brooklyn, in which he explores themes of love, loss, history, identity, protest and popular culture. He moves from the inner worlds of grief and love to form a poetic dialect between the familial and the historical.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 7:30 PM
Brigantine Room, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
1
Canada, Fall In!
International Festival of Authors, Saturday, November 1 at 7:30pm
Presented by the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario

Don’t miss a very special presentation of historian Hugh Brewster’s Canada, Fall In! The Great War Remembered in Words, Images and Song, an unforgettable concert performance that tells the story of Canadians in WWI through their own letters and diaries.

In two sold-out performances at the 2014 Elora Festival, Canada, Fall In! brought audiences to their feet––and to tears. “Every Canadian should see this!” was a frequent comment by audience members afterward. Canada, Fall In! presents a dramatic depiction of the events of 1914 to 1918 with actors, singers and haunting choral music complemented by a screen show of powerful photographs and splendidly remastered archival footage.

Distinguished Canadian actors Christopher Newton, Brigitte Robinson and Andrew Kushnir bring to life the names now etched on monuments—Ypres, Vimy, Passchendaele and Mons. The Elora Festival Singers, under the baton of Noel Edison, recreate the music of the period—from “Tipperary” and “Roses of Picardy” to forgotten Canadians songs like “Canada, Fall In” and ‘We Are Sam Hughes’s Army” to choral tributes by Healey Willan and others.

This special IFOA event is FREE and open to the public, thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to canadafallin@ifoa.org, as seating is limited.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 - 7:30 PM
Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: FREE (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Event location: Fleck Dance Theatre, 207 Queens Quay W, Toronto, ON M5J 2G8
Nov
2
Shevchenko Foundation presents WWI and the Internment of Ukrainian Canadians: A Literary Perspective
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 11am
With the start of WWI came the War Measures Act, which was introduced and activated, in the interest of Canadian national security, to arrest and imprison citizens based on the country from which they had emigrated. Join Ukrainian writers Jars Balan, Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch and Bohdan Kordan as they discuss this controversial statute and its implications for Canada’s Ukrainian community. Alexander Motyl hosts and moderates.

The Shevchenko Foundation is a national, chartered philanthropic institution dedicated to the preservation and promotion of the Ukrainian Canadian cultural heritage and the advancement of a flourishing Ukrainian community.

Jars Balan has published numerous articles on diverse aspects of the history and literature of Ukrainians in Canada, and is the author of Salt and Braided Bread: Ukrainian Life in Canada. Balan is a freelance writer, editor, literary translator and former broadcaster. Currently he is the co-director of the Kule Ukrainian Canadian Studies Centre at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS) in Edmonton. Balan presents on events and issues during WWI with translated materials from Ukrainian to English not yet published.

Bohdan Kordan is the author of Canada and the Ukrainian Question, 1939–45: A Study in Statecraft; Enemy Aliens, Prisoners of War: Internment in Canada during the Great War and A Bare and Impolitic Right: Internment and Ukrainian-Canadian Redress. Currently, Kordan is professor and Chair of the Department of Political Studies, St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan, and serves as the Director of the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage. He presents his recently completed manuscript, No Free Man: Internment and the Enemy Alien Experience in Canada, 1914–1920.

Alexander Motyl is a writer, painter and professor. He is the author of Whiskey Priest, Who Killed Andrei Warhol, Flippancy, The Jew Who Was Ukrainian, My Orchidia, Sweet Snow and Fall River. Motyl’s artwork has been exhibited in NYC, Philadelphia and Toronto and is on display at www.artsicle.com. He teaches political science at Rutgers University-Newark.

In 2008, Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch was awarded the Order of Princess Olga for her story, Enough, which chronicles the famine in Ukraine in the 1930s that claimed millions of lives. Her book Making Bombs for Hitler won the 2014 Manitoba Young Readers’ Choice Award and the Forest of Reading® Silver Birch® Fiction Award, and was shortlisted for the Kobzar Literary Award and the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young Readers. Skrypuch presents Dance of the Banished, a compelling work of historical fiction set during the Ukrainian Canadian internment that details a young couple caught between warring countries.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 11:00 AM
Lakeside Terrace, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)… (more)
Nov
2
READING: David Bergen, Michael Crummey, Charlotte Gray and Claire Holden Rothman
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 12pm
Authors David Bergen, Michael Crummey, Charlotte Gray and Claire Holden Rothman read from their latest works.

David Bergen is the award-winning author of eight novels, including The Time in Between, winner of the 2005 Scotiabank Giller Prize, The Matter with Morris, shortlisted for both the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and the bestselling The Age of Hope, a finalist for CBC Canada Reads in 2013. Bergen presents Leaving Tomorrow, an emotionally powerful story about a hopeful young man who yearns for a larger life outside of his small town in Alberta.

Michael Crummey is the bestselling author of four books of poetry and a book of short stories, Flesh and Blood. His debut novel, River Thieves, was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and his second, The Wreckage, was a finalist for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize. His most recent novel, Galore, won the Commonwealth Book Prize in 2010 and was a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award. Crummey presents Sweetland, a deeply suspenseful story about one man's struggles against the forces of nature and the ruins of memory.

Charlotte Gray is one of Canada’s preeminent biographers and historians. She is the recipient of many awards and is a Member of the Order of Canada. Gray presents her latest work of non-fiction, The Massey Murder: A Maid, Her Master and the Trial that Shocked a Country, which was shortlisted for the RBC Taylor Prize. The book tells the sensational true story of Carrie Davies, the maid who shot a member of one of Canada’s wealthiest families in 1915.

Poet Jacob McArthur Mooney's last collection, Folk, was shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize and the Trillium Book Award in Poetry. He curates and hosts the bi-weekly Pivot Reading Series in Toronto.

Claire Holden Rothman is the author of two story collections and a bestselling novel, The Heart Specialist, longlisted for the 2009 Scotiabank Giller Prize and published in six countries. Her translation of Canada’s first novel, L’influence d’un livre (The Influence of a Book) by Philippe-Ignace François Aubert de Gaspé, won the John Glassco Translation Prize. She lives in Montreal with playwright Arthur Holden. Rothman presents her 2014 Scotiabank Giller Prize longlisted novel, My October, a masterful tale of a modern family torn apart by the power of language and the weight of history.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 12:00 PM
Brigantine Room, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
2
ROUND TABLE: Based on a True Story
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 12pm
Five writers discuss their real-life inspirations and the directions these inspirations led them in. George Fetherling will participate in this round table, as well as host and moderate.

Julie Angus is a molecular biologist, adventurer, writer and photographer. She is the first woman to row across the Atlantic Ocean from mainland to mainland, and for her explorations she received National Geographic’s Adventurer of the Year award. Angus has written for publications including The Globe and Mail, National Post and enRoute. She has authored three books and her photography has appeared in numerous magazines. Angus presents Olive Odyssey: Searching for the Secrets of the Fruit That Seduced the World, in which she travels the Mediterranean to unlock the secrets of this important fruit, resulting in a fascinating history and biography of the olive.

George Fetherling is a prolific poet, novelist, cultural commentator and memoirist. He has published 50 books of poetry, fiction, criticism, history and biography, including the novel Walt Whitman’s Secret and the poetry collection The Sylvia Hotel Poems. Fetherling presents the expanded 20th anniversary edition of his memoir Travels by Night, which discusses literary life in the 1960s.

Catherine Gildiner's childhood memoir Too Close to the Falls was a New York Times and Globe and Mail bestseller. The sequel, After the Falls, was also a bestseller, and her novel, Seduction, was published to international acclaim. She presents the third and final volume of her memoir series, Coming Ashore. Picking up her story in the late ’60s at age 21, Gildiner determinedly blazes her own trail through all the passion and uncertainty that comes with the cusp of adulthood.

Alison Pick is the author of Far to Go, which was longlisted for the prestigious Man Booker Prize, won the Canadian Jewish Book Award for Fiction and was named a Top 10 of 2010 Book by NOW Magazine and the Toronto Star. She is also a noted poet. Pick presents her moving and unforgettable memoir, Between Gods, which explores family secrets and the rediscovered past.

Rudy Wiebe is a novelist, short story writer and essayist. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction for both The Temptations of Big Bear and for A Discovery of Strangers, as well as the RBC Taylor Prize for his memoir, Of This Earth. Weibe is also an Officer of the Order of Canada. He presents his first novel in 11 years, the lyrical masterwork Come Back. Inspired by his life, it is a rare and beautiful novel about the humanity of living and dying.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 12:00 PM
Studio Theatre, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
2
Myanmar@IFOA
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 1pm
Join authors Nay Phone Latt, Ma Thida and Khin Mya Zin as they discuss the state of literature in Myanmar. Karen Connelly hosts. This conversation is made possible by the support of PEN Canada.

This event is part of Found in Translation, a yearly Festival focus on the art of literary translation with the goal of increasing Canadian awareness of international talent.

Karen Connelly is the author of 10 books of bestselling non-fiction, fiction and poetry. She has won the Pat Lowther Memorial Award for her poetry, the Governor General’s Award for her non-fiction and Britain’s Orange Broadband Prize for New Fiction for her first novel, The Lizard Cage. Connelly presents her latest collection of poetry, Come Cold River, a searing portrayal of her troubled family. Refracted through different Canadian cities and foreign landscapes, the book expands into an authentic homage to those who are made invisible and silenced.

Nay Phone Latt, a blogger and activist, is Secretary of the PEN Myanmar Centre. In 2007, his blog provided coverage of the Buddhist monk-led protests, which local media were forbidden to report. He was sentenced to 20 years in prison for his reporting but was released in 2012 as part of a mass political pardon. In 2010, he received the PEN/Barbara Goldsmith Freedom to Write Award.

Dr. Ma Thida, a surgeon, human rights activist and writer, is President of the newly formed PEN Myanmar Centre. In October 1993, she was sentenced to 20 years in prison for her writings in support of Aung San Suu Kyi. In 1996, she was released following political pressure from organizations including PEN International. That same year. she was the recipient of the PEN/Barbara Goldsmith Freedom to Write Award.

Khin Mya Zin is a short story writer. In 2012, her short story collection Clouds in the Sky and Other Stories won the Myanmar National Literary Award.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 1:00 PM
Lakeside Terrace, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
2
ROUND TABLE: How We Remember War
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 2pm
How do we do justice to an experience that we didn’t live through? Three historians share their research process, and debate the rewards and pitfalls of writing historical non-fiction. Bert Archer hosts and moderates.

Bert Archer is a writer for the National Post, The Globe and Mail, Hazlitt, Toronto Life and Yonge Street Media. He was a full-time book reviewer and literary journalist in Canada and the USA for the better part of a decade. He has written one book and contributed to half a dozen others. Archer also spent this past April visiting the battlefields of Nord-Pas de Calais and Normandy, and July retracing the first war's first steps in the Balkans.

Ted Barris is an accomplished author, journalist and broadcaster. As well as hosting stints on CBC Radio and regular contributions to The Globe and Mail, the National Post and various national magazines, Barris is a full-time professor of journalism at Centennial College in Toronto. He has authored 17 non-fiction books, including the national bestsellers Victory at Vimy and Juno. He presents The Great Escape: A Canadian Story, which chronicles one of the most astonishing prison breaks in WWII from the viewpoint of those who experienced it.

Hugh Brewster is an acclaimed war historian and the author of several award-winning works of fiction and non-fiction for younger readers, including On Juno Beach, Dieppe and At Vimy Ridge, which won the Norma Fleck Award. Brewster is an in-demand speaker, praised for his ability to bring history alive for audiences of all ages. He presents From Vimy to Victory: Canada’s Fight to Finish in World War I, in which he captures the remarkable heroism, sacrifice and victories of Canadian soldiers during the Great War.

J.L. Granatstein is Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus in the department of History at York University. His scholarship has won numerous awards, including the J.B. Tyrrell Historical Medal, the Vimy Award and the Pierre Berton Award. In 1996, he became an Officer of the Order of Canada. Granatstein has received honorary degrees from the University of Western Ontario, the University of Calgary and McMaster University, among others. He presents The Greatest Victory: Canada’s One Hundred Days, 1918. This fascinating narrative tells the story of the Canada-led offensive that began on August 8, 1918 and ended with Armistice on November 11.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 2:00 PM
Studio Theatre, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
2
ROUND TABLE: Forms of Fiction
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 2pm
A novel, a short story collection, an encyclopedic collage—authors talk the myriad forms a story can take. Catherine Bush moderates.

Catherine Bush is the author of four novels: Amazon.ca Best Book Accusation, the Trillium Award-shortlisted Claire’s Head, The Rules of Engagement (which was chosen as a New York Times Notable Book) and Minus Time. Her non-fiction has appeared in the anthology The Heart Does Break and elsewhere. She coordinates the University of Guelph Creative Writing MFA.

Emma Donoghue is a writer of contemporary and historical fiction whose eight novels include the internationally bestselling Room—winner of both the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Canada and Caribbean Region) and the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the Man Booker Prize—as well as Slammerkin, Life Mask and The Sealed Letter. She lives in London, Ontario with her partner and their two children. Donoghue presents her latest novel, Frog Music, a lyrical tale of love and bloodshed among lowlifes in San Francisco in 1876.

Aislinn Hunter’s acclaimed collection of stories, What's Left Us, was a finalist for the Danuta Gleed Award and the ReLit Award, and her poetry, Into the Early Hours, was shortlisted for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize and won the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award. Hunter’s novel Stay was a finalist for the Amazon.ca First Novel Award and was recently adapted for film. She presents The World Before Us, her first book of fiction in 12 years. It is a riveting exploration of the repercussions of small acts, the power of affection and the irrepressible vitality of everyday objects and events.

Eliza Robertson studied creative writing at the University of Victoria, then pursued her MA in prose fiction at the University of East Anglia, where she received a Man Booker Scholarship and the Curtis Brown Prize for best writer. She was a finalist for the 2013 CBC Short Story Prize, won the Commonwealth Short Story Prize for "We Walked on Water," and her short story "My Sister Sang" was shortlisted for the 2013 Journey Prize. Robertson presents her debut collection, Wallflowers, a quirky and masterful bouquet that smashes stereotypes and shows us remarkable new ways of experiencing the world.

Diane Schoemperlen has published several collections of short fiction and three novels. Her short story collection The Man of My Dreams was shortlisted for both the Governor General’s Award and the Trillium Book Award. In 2008, she received the Marian Engel Award from the Writers’ Trust of Canada. Schoemperlen presents By the Book: Stories and Pictures, a sequel to her Governor General’s Award-winning Forms of Devotion, in which she pieces together fragments from old encyclopedias in the form of verbal and visual collage, breathing new life into the old forgotten texts.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 2:00 PM
Brigantine Room, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
2
READING/INTERVIEW: Peter C. Newman
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 3pm
Please join us for a very special celebration of this beloved Canadian journalist’s career.

Peter C. Newman has been writing about Canadian politics for nearly half a century, and his Renegade in Power revolutionized Canadian political reporting with its controversial “insiders-tell-all” approach. His books have sold over two million copies, garnering such prestigious literary awards as the Drainie-Taylor Biography Prize. A former editor-in-chief of the Toronto Star and Maclean’s, Newman has been honoured with a National Newspaper Award for Feature Writing and multiple National Magazine awards. Newman is a Companion of the Order of Canada and has been elected to the News Hall of Fame.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 3:00 PM
Lakeside Terrace, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)
… (more)
Nov
2
A Tribute to Alistair MacLeod
International Festival of Authors, Sunday, November 2 at 4pm
Alistair MacLeod, author of the multi award-winning No Great Mischief and one of Canada’s most beloved storytellers, passed away in April. This fall, the IFOA hosts some of this country’s top literary talent as they reflect on MacLeod’s influence and present readings of his work. Join us in celebrating the life of one of our greatest authors. Douglas Gibson hosts.

Douglas Gibson worked as an editor and publisher from 1968 until he retired from McClelland & Stewart in 2009. His Douglas Gibson Books was Canada’s first editorial imprint and lives on today. He is the author of a book of memoirs, Stories About Storytellers.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 - 4:00 PM
Brigantine Room, 235 Queens Quay West, Toronto M5J 2G8

Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under (Jenni_Canuck)… (more)
Nov
27
Amy Tan will be promoting The Valley of Amazement
Harbourfront Centre, Thursday, November 27 at unknown time
Amy Tan will be promoting The Valley of Amazement (added from HarperCollins)
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