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Member: Kunikov

CollectionsYour library (1,614)

Reviews37 reviews

TagsWWII (514), Eastern Front (359), Soviet Union (290), Fiction (172), Stalin (116), Holocaust (106), Nazi Germany (78), History (75), Red Army (68), Wehrmacht (53) — see all tags

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About meI'm a history major specializing in the Eastern Front of the Second World War and the Soviet Union.

About my libraryI've been working on my 'library' for almost 15 years now. In terms of Tags, N I L stands for 'not in library' (meaning I no longer have the book in my home 'library'), everything else I think is self explanatory.

GroupsSecond World War History

Homepagehttp://kunikovsreviews.blogspot.com/

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Favorite authorsNot set

Account typepublic, lifetime

URLs /profile/Kunikov (profile)
/catalog/Kunikov (library)

Member sinceJun 10, 2006

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Comments

Check out today's Wall Street Journal reivew of Stalin's General. See my comment about the review in the World War II Group message section.

Cheers,

Joseph Hudson
I have uploaded a cover for Kiev 1941: Hitler's Battle for Supremacy in the East by David Stahel
I would note that David Glanz, a retired (I think) army colonel, doesn't read the language (as a number of other writers on the eastern war likewise don't). His writing is vivid and sometimes compelling, but his (and their) sources are necessarily limited.
The main historians working on the subject who do read Russian/Ukrainian and have worked directly in those archives are William Fuller, Bruce Menning, Bob Baumann (these two being army employees at Ft Leavenworth), as well as Amir Weiner (Stanford) and a few other academics.
Happy reading!
I would note that David Glanz, a retired (I think) army colonel, doesn't read the language (as a number of other writers on the eastern war likewise don't). His writing is vivid and sometimes compelling, but his (and their) sources are necessarily limited.
The main historians working on the subject who do read Russian/Ukrainian and have worked directly in those archives are William Fuller, Bruce Menning, Bob Baumann (these two being army employees at Ft Leavenworth), as well as Amir Weiner (Stanford) and a few other academics.
Happy reading!
Yes I knew I just thought I would get it a mention here!
I see you have the misfortune to own a copy of 'Honor Denied: The Combat Memoirs of SS Radio Operator Karl Metzger'. This book and its contents are the fabrication of the author. He made it all up in the hope no one would notice.
I have been intending to read some Glantz for a while (he's one of the big military historians I haven't gotten around to yet), and I suppose that his two volumes about Leningrad would make for a good introduction. Consider them ordered. Leningrad: State of Siege sounds quite interesting as well, will have to check it out when it is released at the end of June.

Thanks for the recommendations.
Thanks about "Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler." Yeah, would be interested in hearing of any more thoughts you have on it after you finish it. Grateful as always, ER
Hi there

I have been reading your blog for a while, and I was wondering: could you recommend a good book on the siege of Leningrad? Having a look around on Amazon, I see that there are quite a few books on the topic, which makes me somewhat uncertain about where to start.
Thanks for the update on the Terror book, good idea to put it up on Amazon Marketplace, since though it's not what you or I were interested in, for others it may be just the book.
Thanks and wish you great success in the field.
I'm curious about Terror: How Israel Has Coped and What American Can Learn, and its 2 Amazon reviews are totally vague. So when you get around to reading it or even getting a feel for it, more info would be great. I'm wondering if Israel is coping now like they used to, with all their one-sided concessions to terrorists relabeled moderates, even releasing terrorists, not getting their kidnapped soldiers back, not having gas masks for its citizens (http://israelmatzav.blogspot.com/2007/09/dm-holds-off-on-distributing-gas-masks....), it's all very strange.
Thank you for Kolyma Tales tip! I am so glad you've got you library on LT, I'm getting so many good ideas from you. - ER
If you get a chance, check out the out-of-print survival autobiography "Coming Out of the Ice" by Victor Herman, it's truly exceptional, a masterpiece.
Excellent collection. I also have a deep interest in the Eastern Front, and, more generally, the Soviet Union. Your review of Davies is spot on.
Please when you get a feel for whether "Lenin, Stalin, & Hitler" is a good book, primarily in terms of accuracy, but also if for other reasons (presentation, slant, new contribution, etc), I'd really appreciate hearing about it, even if just a thumbs up or down. Thanks - ER
Interesting. Could you give an example of Furst's inaccuracy? I'm largely ignorant of the period, myself...
Oh, I liked Dark Star fine. My ratings system is a little harsh; two stars means "okay, but not great." It didn't have the emotional connection that I found in some of his other books, which would have warranted another 1/2 or full star...
Outstanding, I'll get to work!
Thanks,
David
Thanks very much! That would be fantastic, if it isn't an imposition. I'm also planning on reading some Solzhenitsyn over the summer.
David.
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