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Member: dhoyt

CollectionsYour library (2,424)

Reviews10 reviews

Tagsfiction (259), history (217), travel (163), reference (141), fortean (139), country life (126), climate (112), wonders (97), sf (96), eccentrics (91) — see all tags

Cloudstag cloud, author cloud, tag mirror

Recommendations1 recommendations

About meI have four new books out or being written. One is "The Broomsticks of Oz" which can be seen at http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/534157
About 10 people have read and reviewed it and they all like it.

The other new book is "Kaleidoscopic Images" at
http://community.shutterfly.com/gallery/post/start.sfly?postId=/gallery/1/post/G...

Another book, "The Early History of Trading Stamps" is also being written. The current version has 300 pages. The gallery shows some of the rarer and better designed early trading stamps. About half of them have no known surviving copies.

The fourth book "Chronology of Weather Extremes from 500 to 2006 AD, or 10,000 Noteworthy Events" is finished, unless new material emerges. It shows that extreme events have been common throughout history and most of the worst events occurred before 1900. This book will probably not be published due to copyright restrictions.

I am a retired solar physicist and climatologist, who has written three books and about 100 scientific articles.

About my libraryMy library has about 2050 books and 2350 volumes. Most of the books are nonfiction and there are some concentrated collections such as country living, wonders of the world, climate change, genealogy, travel, history, chronologies and day books, and so forth.

Does anyone else have a copy of The Life and Letters of Eliza White, published about 1820? She lived in Freeport, Maine. The book has been handed down in my family for 6 generations, along with several other books. As far as I can tell, no other copy of this book exists.

As of 9/9/2006, 956 books I have are shared by someone else on librarything.com. 957 books are unique to my library. The large number of unique books arises from my unusual interests in the curious and wonderful and also from the fact that it makes sense to own books that the local public library is unlikely to have. I have 51 books from 1675 to 1848 and all 51 are unique to my library. The first non-unique book is Wonderful Characters by Henry Wilson, that edition being published in 1848.

Update on 11/5/2006: Now there are 1042 shared books and 878 unique books.

Update on 2/5/2007: Now there are 1158 shared books and 768 unique books, or 100 less unique books compared to 3 months ago.

Update on 5/5/2007: Now there are 1264 shared books and 667 unique books, or 101 less unique books compared to 3 months ago. It seems about 100 unique books become shared every 3 months.

Update on 8/5/2007: Now it is 1314 shared books and 627 unique books, down by 40 over 3 months.

Update on 11/4/2007: Now it is 1359 shared books and 594 unique books.

The first book, published in 1675, is De veritate religionis christianae by Hugo Grotius. I did not buy this book. It was handed down in the family for the last 6 generations and I am not sure where it was before then.

Finally I should add that I have 9 boxes of books that are not catalogued. These books are supposed to be sold or given away at some point. It is about 200 to 250 books total. Perhaps I should catalog them and tag them as "for sale".

GroupsGenealogy@LT

Favorite authorsJoel Achenbach, Thomas Bartlett, L. Frank Baum, Robert Benchley, Robert M. Bryce, Bernal Díaz del Castillo, Wallace O. Chariton, John Christopher, William R. Corliss, Jack Douglas, Arthur Conan Doyle, Andrew A. Freeman, David Grayson, Helen Hamlin, W.A. Harbinson, Constance Helmericks, Edward Hordern, David Kahn, Robert Lacey, Edward E. Leslie, Magnus Magnusson, Joe McGinniss, James W. Moseley, Ogden Nash, R. M. Patterson, Ernie Pyle, Bill Richardson, Louise Dickinson Rich, George Burbank Sedgley, Robert W. Service, Lemony Snicket, George R. Stewart, Henry David Thoreau, J. R. R. Tolkien, Charlotte M Vaile, Connie Willis (Shared favorites)

VenuesFavorites

Favorite bookstoresBlue Plate Books

Favorite librariesMary Jane & James L. Bowman Library

Membership LibraryThing Early Reviewers/Member Giveaway

LocationBerkeley Springs, WV

Account typepublic, lifetime

URLs /profile/dhoyt (profile)
/catalog/dhoyt (library)

Member sinceJul 14, 2006

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Benedict, Jackson & Company was active from late 1897 to 1905, when it went bankrupt. It was a major competitor in Chicago, Milwaukee, Racine, and other cities throughout the mid-west. By 1903 it extended form Idaho to Connecticut and New York, where it ran the Benedict and McFarlane Company. Ed Schuster & Company of Milwaukee adopted their stamp in Jan 1898 and in 1939 claimed to have invented trading stamps.
As we are the only two folks here who have copies of George Lofton's Character Sketches in our libraries, I thought you might like to know that I have just uploaded a cover image.
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This is likely the third earliest trading stamp issued by the Cooperative Premium Association whose founding headquarters were somewhere in the Missouri River Valley, perhaps Omaha. They appear to have issued stamps starting in December 1895. From 1897 to 1908, their stamps were red and had the words "Not Transferable" on them.
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The second earliest known trading stamp issued by the Merchants Premium Company of Chicago. The company was founded in 1890 and the earliest confirmed use of the stamps is 1894 according to one of its founders. The book discusses an earlier trading stamp.
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This coupon comes from Georgia in 1893. During the years 1892-1898, punched or inked stamped coupons were competitors to trading stamps. With punched coupons, the storekeeper did all the work to complete a booklet. With stamps, the customer did all the work to complete a booklet.
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The Atlanta Trading Stamp Company began in 1897 and continued to at least 1909 when it was taken over by Bass. The company seems to have dominated the Atlanta market during these years. No known copies of their stamps exist.
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The Home Coupon Exchange Company of Trenton NJ later became the Red Star Trading Stamp Company. Formed in 1897, it was active until 1907 all along the eastern seaboard from Boston to Atlanta. The stamp above is a reconstructed copy of its first stamp in 1897. No copies of this stamp exist.
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Only one newspaper ad illustrating these stamps appeared in 1903 in Worcester MA. No known copies of the stamps exist.
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Fillmore Street Merchants gave away Trading Coupons in 1921 in San Francisco CA. These colorful stamps are moderately rare.
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The International Cash Savings Stamp Company was located on the eighth floor of the Atlanta Trust Building in 1913. 140 stores distributed their stamps. No copies of the stamps have survived and it is not known if they were red or not.
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Neighborhood Discount Trading Stamps were issued for short time in 1910 in Chicago. No known copies of the stamp have survived.
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National Moo-V Stamp Corporation of Cleveland issued these stamps in 1915. Their color is unknown but shown in red. 20 stamps entitled one to see a movie. No known copies of the stamps exist.
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The National Trading Stamp Company of Albany NY closed in 1897 and the above is probably a copy of the stamp issued by the short-lived company. The stamp is very rare and at least 2 copies exist.
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These stamps were issued in Bangor Maine in the early 1900s. Less than 20 copies of the stamps are known to exist.
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Traders Supply Company was headquartered in Bridgeport CT and had extensive operations in more than 20 cities in New England and New York from 1896 to 1900. It dominated the Boston market in 1897-98. Stephen C. Osborne and Frank Miller were its founders. It is an interesting company in that it issued completely different stamp designs in every city it entered (21 or more). Nine designs are known of which one is shown above.
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The Southern Trading Stamp Company, headquartered in Greensboro NC, was active in many of the major cities of the South and was an active competitor to S&H from 1898 to 1908. No copies of the stamps are known to exist.
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Coatsville PA issued their own trading stamps cicra 1910. Less than 20 copies of these stamps exist.
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The Fair stamps were issued in 1907. Less than 10 copies are known to exist.
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These stamps began around 1904. The Arcade was a large chain of stores around the turn of century. No known copies of the stamp exist and it not certain if they were red or not.
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Samuel G. Blattner, 229-331 South Main Street, Lima, made these stamps starting in 1912. There are no surviving copies of the stamp.
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Starting around May 1909, Phillips Home Trading Stamps were used in Chicago.
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A colorful stamp known to be used in Edwardsville, IL in 1932.
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Probably from the Lyons Mercantile Coupon Company of Lyons NY in 1897.
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This stamp was issued by the Riley, Schubert, and Grossman store in Chicago circa 1914-1918. Only one copy of this stamp is known to exist.
I uploaded a cover for this book if you are interwested.
http://www.librarything.com/work/book/51058348
One less unique book for your information and updating since I also own a copy of "Phillips Through My Eyes" by Winona Davenport. I used to work with her husband Gordon.

byinbyan
A very unique library you have there, sir (or madame, as the case may be). I look forward to examining it at greater length.

Best Wishes!
You have a tag "fortean" that appears to be related to paranormal. What does it mean? I see 66 other users use it so it's obviously somewhat well known, yet I've never heard the term used before.

- Greg
Hi,

I noticed that we share a copy of The Sandy River & Its Valley, by Vincent York. The author spent sometime in Phillips, Me (on the Sandy River) where my mother grew up. A 90-year old cousin remembers him as the husband of an owner of an Inn there.

Note that we also share a copy of The Atmosphere. That book apparently had been deleted from some college library and picked up at a book sale by some family member.

These two books were among your unique books.
Oh yeah, one more thing...LOC has a Charles S Morris who in 1990 collaborated on a book titled "The Prepayment experience of FNMA mortgage-backed securities".
http://catalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?Search%5FArg=morris%2C%20charles%20...

Granted that the early Charles Morris is Charles Smith Morris, I could go ahead and combine Charles and Charles S, but then it could create even more confusion if this other Charles S decides to go off and write about GNMA, or SallieMae, or even Mae West! Sorry, now I know I have been at this too long. :p
Excellent! I found him in the LOC catalog too. Charles Morris (1833-1922). Definitely the right author - they list “The San Francisco Calamity”, “The Destruction of St. Pierre and St. Vincent”, “Life and Reign of Queen Victoria”, several of the “Historical Tales”, and a whole slew of books about Teddy Roosevelt. Looks like he must have recycled his TR material under different titles to increase sales! I have put links to Beadle and Adams and the LOC catalog on the author page.

I also put a link to the LOC catalog on the Charles R Morris page. Yesterday I thought I had all of the “American Catholics” cleared out of Charles Morris and sent over to Charles R. But today several new copies have been entered, all with author “Charles Morris” (garbage input from Amazon), which tipped the balance and brought them all back. ARGGGHH! I don’t know why I am obsessing over this one author, when I have so many books to catalog, but this is driving me crazy!

At Project Gutenberg, I found a free download of “The San Francisco Calamity by Earthquake and Fire”
http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/1560
If you click on the author’s name, they also have several of the “Historical Tales”.
Thanks! CLICnet looks like a great reference - I will have to remember to look there for my other dusty old volumes. That is definitely the correct author - I have "The San Francisco Calamity by Earthquake and Fire" and "The Volcano's Deadly Work". I didn't see any reference to Charles S Morris or Charles Smith Morris on CLICnet, so I assume you are getting that from one or more of your books by the same author? Please let me know, and I will go back and try to finish cleaning up the Author page.

You have a wonderful collection! I am very jealous over all those 19th century (and earlier!) books. We share only 8 titles right now, but I can see that I am going to mess up your unique book count as I add more of mine. So far we have the only copies of “Great Canadian Disasters” by Frank Rasky and of course “The Volcano’s Deadly Work”. I also have quite a few of the titles you have tagged “wonders” and “western US”.

Since you have several volumes on Bigfoot, you might enjoy “Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science” by Jeff Meldrum. He appears to be agnostic on the existence of Sasquatch, but attempts to apply scientific method to the evidence offered by others.
I don't know about the Historical Tales, I have never seen them. But I am looking at my copy of "The Volcano's Deadly Work" from 1902, and the author is "Charles Morris LL.D." No R. "Charles R Morris" is I think still alive, writing about the AARP, American Christians, and I don't know what all else.

This one isn't even half bad - I should never have allowed myself to look at the Combiners page! I don't know how much time I spent the other day, trying to separate John M Barry of "Rising Tide", from John A Barry who appears to be a Weird Al wannabe song parodist, from TWO John Barrys - one a 70ish British composer of James Bond movie scores, and the other an American rock climber who writes climbing guides.

Amazing that you have so many lonely onlys in your library! Mine seem to run about 10%-15%, depending on which shelf I am scouring next. I just love all those strange old books.
I hope that you will post the uncataloged books and mark them for sale. I'm always looking for out-of-print disaster books and who knows? You might have some!

Furdog
Hi - I've uploaded a cover for Earth, Sea and Sky by Northrop. FYI
You have an interesting book collection and I noticed we share a fairly obscure book - Like a straight pine tree; stories of Reconstruction days in Alabama and Florida, 1885-1971 by D. A. Avant.

I have this book because I grew up in Gadsden County Florida, near where the author's family lived - just wondered how it came to be in your library?
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