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Member: eswnr

CollectionsYour library (2,438), Read but unowned (44), Currently reading (1), All collections (2,479)

Reviews24 reviews

Tagsfiction (1,371), history (568), BC remainder (550), U.S. history (423), B&N remainder (339), junk store (296), Book Barn (268), read (222), biography (221), music (206) — see all tags

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Recommendations2 recommendations

About meI'm part of a solution and part of a problem, sometimes both on the same day.

In addition to amassing books, I also tend to obsess over music.

About my libraryMost people think I'm a complete freak because I'm completely incapable of actually deciding what to read next. So, I write all my unread books on little scraps of paper, throw them in a small box, and pick them at random. Of course, I frequently deviate from this ridiculous scheme, but it's nice to fall back on.

This is all stuff I actually currently own, much to my own chagrin. I can't help it - I find books cheap, I stockpile them for when I'll eventually get to them. In the past two years, I believe I've bought 4 books at list price. All the rest have been remaindered or used. It's much more fun to wander blindly into a used bookstore and find what's lying around for $3 that has underlining and someone's inscription written in the title page than it is for the immediate satisfaction of order the book, get it in 3 business days. Where's the sport in that? (Cheaper, too.)

The bigger problem, though, is when I use the interweb to buy in bulk. Shipping is free when I spend over $75! Well, why didn't you say so? Like my last order: $75 for 32 books or so. I need help.

Favorite inscription I've ever seen in a used book: a '60s vintage mass market paperback of John Rechy's sorta-trashy sorta-literary City of Night. Next to the author's dedication, "To Mom and Dad", continues an inscription from the prior page about how this is "probably the biggest dig in the whole book". Ouch!

GroupsBob Dylan, Booksellers, Booksellers who LibraryThing, RYM/Rate Your Music, Used Books, USERS FROM THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS

VenuesFavorites | Visited

Favorite bookstoresBarnes & Noble Booksellers - Glastonbury, Barnes & Noble Booksellers - Millbury, Barnes & Noble Booksellers - West Hartford, Ben Franklin Bookstore and Worcester Antiquarian Book Center, Raven Used Book Shop, The Book Barn, The Book Barn Downtown, The Book Bear, The Old Book Store

Also onFacebook, Rate Your Music

Real nameEric Sweenor

LocationMeriden, CT

Favorite authorsNot set

Account typepublic, lifetime

URLs /profile/eswnr (profile)
/catalog/eswnr (library)

Member sinceJun 1, 2007

Currently readingThe Drowned World by J. G. Ballard

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Comments

HO! I just reread Ebenezer, , , hope you will like it as much as I do. (And Hoban's "Bat Tattoo" is a good introduction to a fine author. I recently reread his "Her Name Was Lola," a gem.)
I heart Blue Yonder in Rainbow Stories. Let me know what you think.
I split it open and read some paras. Good stuff. I am looking forward to it. I need to finish Ulysses off and also Shantaram which is a much easier read but is a behemoth. I like Shantaram, despite the Pat Conroy/Dr. Phil life lessons that are explicitly spelled out at every turn, its a fun read full of adventures. A solid three-star book.
Yeah I hear you. Perhaps the best way I've seen of explaining DON (Federman says his friends call Double or Nothing "DON"--pays to email forgotten postmodernists from the 70s for tidbits like that! oh and he called Samuel Beckett "Sam" during their friendship; you should email him too -- moinous@aol.com -- I bet he'd love to hear from another fan!) is by calling it a "concrete novel". But then that assumes a person would know what "concrete poetry" is, and if they didn't, you'd then not only have to explain "concrete novel" but "concrete poetry" as well! If you ever think of a better way of explaining DON do let me know because you're right, it's very funny (what I've read so far, just got it myself) and of the most creatively originally structured novels ever. Critics would call it "gimmicky," but then they'd also have to call two future classics it influenced, "House Of Leaves" and William H. Gass' "The Tunnel" gimmicky too--and they'd be wrong on both counts.
Hi,

Was wondering if you'd be interested in reviewing my new novel and posting your comments here as well as a few other book-related sites. Saw you liked Paris Trout, and I thought you might like my novel since it's also southern and a bit dark. I could e-mail you the novel in an e-book format if you'd like. Let me know if you're interested. Here's a link to a summary in case you're interested:

http://christophertusa.com/blog/?page_id...

Thanks,

Chris
Between the used books, the galleys, the amazon used-book sellers, and the occasional got-to-have-it new book, I'm beginning to think there is no real hope for people like us. Online bookswapping hasn't really helped me, either, because, I just trade books I already have for books that I don't have.

Just to let you in on what a lost cause I am, since writing that original comment on my profile, I bought a three-shelve, fairly wide new bookcase to keep my piled-up titles. After transfering all the piles to the shelves, I realized that I now had exactly enough room for more piles to develop.
Cold Dog Soup!
Good to know I am not the only one who agonizes over what to read next. I may try out your method, as my current method of "stare at books, pick up and put right back down, stare some more, grab one and read 5 pages, put down and stare some more" is not very efficient.
Oh Billy. Oh Milly.
We share some interesting books.
Thanks so much for enabling me to see Senator Hoar's statue. It is almost as good as being in Worcester in person.

The book I listed : George Frisbie Hoar and the Half-Breed Republicans, by Richard E. Welch, Jr. (read 20 Oct 1984)

is mostly about him and I thought it a good book. Only one other Library Thinger list the book.
Greetings from Manchester!!! Are you enjoying the holiday setup? Our warehouse was so crowded today we actually lost an employee for a little while. Ok, it was me, and I was hiding from customers :-> You know the ones: "I was here last week and saw a book on a table up front - where is it now? I think it was blue." Someone really should tell Corporate that we need to start shelving books by color for our intellectually challenged customers. Cheers!
Greetings from Manchester!!! Are you enjoying the holiday setup? Our warehouse was so crowded today we actually lost an employee for a little while. Ok, it was me, and I was hiding from customers :-> You know the ones: "I was here last week and saw a book on a table up front - where is it now? I think it was blue." Someone really should tell Corporate that we need to start shelving books by color for our intellectually challenged customers. Cheers!
Yeah, the dialogue is ridiculously good. I didn't realise when I started to read it, but since discovered that his use of long emphasis dashes instead of quotation marks was thought to be still very radical at the time of publishing (I don't know whether he uses this technique in Carpenter's Gothic too). See: http://www.nyx.net/~awestrop/ftb/ftb.htm (at pp. 34-35, "conform! (punctuationwise)").
I'm reading The Recognitions. Within a hundred pages it was my favourite book.
Wow...really, wow. It is so refreshing to see someone who has a such a unique and self-personified collection of incredible modern fictional works - i.e. Pynchon, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Stephen Wright, Robert Coover(!), Delillo, A.M Homes, William Gaddis (!!!), I could go on and on...so I won't.

I'll second the excellent photo remark; the only thing better than boxes of books filled w/styrofoam peanuts is a person buried beneath such buffering. Cheers! - Jeremy
Cool pic!
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