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The Club Dumas (Vintage International) by Arturo Perez-Reverte

National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders (Audubon Society Field Guide) by NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY

For Whom The Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

Don Quixote by Miguel Cervantes

Edgar Allan Poe, Selected Poems and Tales / Deluxe by Edgar Allan Poe

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

Finn: A Novel by Jon Clinch

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Hi,

Was wondering if you'd be interested in reviewing my new novel and posting your comments here as well as a few other book-related sites. Saw you liked Butcher Boy, and I thought you might like my novel since it's also about a disturbed adolescent and a bit dark. I could e-mail you the novel in an e-book format if you'd like. Let me know if you're interested. Here's a link to a summary in case you're interested:

http://christophertusa.com/blog/?page_id=724
Thanks,

Chris
Hello there again!

Just wanted to let you know that I finished Duma Key and absolutely love it. At first, I thought I went a bit too slow, but by the time I reached the middle of the book, I fully appreciated the gradual suspense-filled build up. Great ending too.

Thanks for the recommendation!

Rakisha
Thanks for the Duma Key suggestion. I checked out your review and now I am even more inclined to pick it up on my next trip to the library. BTW, love the default pic, lol!
Hello,

Your review of the Complete Idiot's Guide to American Literature is hilarious.

Thanks for the laugh,
Pam
Always nice to find other fans of Martin. I still have A Feast for Crows left to read in ASOIF. How did you like it?

And of course, you have to love Tolkien.

Also, I see you have Umberto Eco listed. I read Name of the Rose by him and really enjoyed it. What others would you recommend?

Steven
http://steventill.com
I adore your collection. The Harvard Classics are just wonderful. AND we're both named Jonathan....:-)
I saw your comment (from a year ago!) asking when, or if, the final book in Dean Koontz's Frankenstein trilogy would be published. I found this on Wikipedia:

...Dead and Alive, co-written with Ed Gorman, to be published in May, 2008 (or "Spring 2008", according to Dean Koontz). The most likely cause for these postponements is Hurricane Katrina[citation needed], as Dean Koontz's Frankenstein is based in New Orleans, Louisiana. The author is not willing to change the setting of Book Three; the publisher (Bantam) is not willing to release Book Three, especially so soon after a major disaster; most importantly, neither party is willing to lose profit by just cancelling Book Three.


In other words, don't hold your breath!
Thanks for Good Omens, it's still one of my favs. =)
Hello - In regards to your question about whether the "Ring" novels are worth reading.....I've only read the first so far and I liked it pretty well. It's a little different than either the original Japanese film or the American version, particularly the fact that the central character is a man - not some female reporter. I bought the second one when it was released here in paperback, but it's one in a stack of many "to be read" books. I guess in short, the first one was good. I thought it was worth reading.
Banana Yoshimoto wrote two of my favorite books -- Kitchen and NP. Highly recommended! You are aware that your profile picture is of a fish, right? ;)
Greetings!

As far as the Weird Fiction tag, I tend to classify it as the writers who contributed to 'Weird Tales' maganzine during its heydey, along with their immediate influences. So, I'd kind of place the range from Dunsany to Lovecraft to Leiber. I don't go back as far as Poe with the classification, but I will allow the late 70s fiction by Wellman and Leiber as they were still exploring some of the themes of their earlier work.
D'oh, I never even noticed the name error! Every so often I'd see that in a record and fix it, but I certainly missed that, even though I was looking right at that record yesterday! Thanks for pointing it out!
Great profile shot.
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