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Series: A New History of Western Philosophy

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Works (5)

TitlesOrder
A New History of Western Philosophy by Anthony KennyComplete Set
Ancient Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy Volume 1 by Anthony Kenny1
Medieval Philosophy (A New History of Western Philosophy, Vol. 2) by Anthony Kenny2
The Rise of Modern Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 3 by Anthony Kenny3
Philosophy in the Modern World: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 4 by Anthony Kenny4

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Recommendations

  1. The Emergence of a Scientific Culture: Science and the Shaping of Modernity 1210-1685 by Stephen Gaukroger (2006)
  2. The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Philosophy by A. S. McGrade (2003)
  3. The Great Philosophers: An Introduction to Western Philosophy by Bryan Magee (1987)
  4. Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 1670-1752 by Jonathan I. Israel (2006)
  5. Classical Philosophy: A history of philosophy without any gaps, Volume 1 by Peter Adamson (2014)
  6. Ancient Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction by Julia Annas (2000)
  7. A Brief History of Western Philosophy by Sir Anthony Kenny (1998)
  8. Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy (Mind Association Occasional) by Tom Sorell (2005)
  9. Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity 1650-1750 by Jonathan I. Israel (2001)
  10. What I Believe by Anthony Kenny (2006)
  11. Vico and Herder: Two Studies in the History of Ideas by Isaiah Berlin (1976)
  12. Plato's Late Ontology: A Riddle Resolved; with a new Introduction, and the Essay "Excess and Deficiency at Statesman by Kenneth Sayre (1983)
  13. Origins of Analytical Philosophy by Michael Dummett (1988)
  14. The Philosophers: Introducing Great Western Thinkers by Ted Honderich (1999)
  15. Philosophy in History: Essays in the Historiography of Philosophy by Richard Rorty (1984)

Series description

In these four volumes Sir Anthony Kenny unfolds a magisterial new history of Western philosophy. Specially written for a broad popular readership, but serious and deep enough to offer a genuine understanding of the great philosophers, Kenny's lucid and stimulating history will become the definitive work for anyone interested in the people and ideas that shaped the course of Western thought. Specially written for a broad popular readership, but serious and deep enough to offer a genuine understanding of the great philosophers, Kenny's lucid and stimulating history will become the definitive work for anyone interested in the people and ideas that shaped the course of Western thought. These four volumes have been designed to dovetail with each other: they offer a unified overview of the entire development of philosophy, allowing readers to trace themes through the centuries, from antiquity to the present day. The story is illuminated by a selection of intriguing and beautiful illustrations.

Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

Helpers

hnn (4), NeueWelle (2), gabriel (1), DromJohn (1)
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