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Series: America in the World

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Works (7)

TitlesOrder
The Other Alliance: Student Protest in West Germany and the United States in the Global Sixties by Martin Klimke2009
Alabama in Africa: Booker T. Washington, the German Empire, and the Globalization of the New South by Andrew Zimmerman2010
The Great American Mission: Modernization and the Construction of an American World Order by David Ekbladh2010
Reforming the World: The Creation of America's Moral Empire by Ian Tyrrell2010
The 1970s: A New Global History from Civil Rights to Economic Inequality by Thomas Borstelmann2011
Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border by Rachel St. John2011
Foreign Relations: American Immigration in Global Perspective by Donna R. Gabaccia2012

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Series description

Edited by Sven Beckert and Jeremi Suri

Published by Princeton University Press.

American history is no longer the history of the nation-state alone. Instead of segregating the history of North America from the rest of the world, some of the newest and most exciting writing integrates America in the world. This movement toward transnational perspectives is taking shape across time periods, methodological preferences, and fields of analysis. American historians will continue to examine the "exceptional" elements of the nation's history, and they will continue to produce local studies. Within the next decade, however, even the most locally centered and "exceptionalist" scholarship will be much more informed by attention to networks, identities, and processes that transcend the nation-state.

This series will bring together the work of a new generation of scholars writing the history of "global America." There is a palpable sense of excitement about such a new perspective. Indeed, the most forward-looking scholars have already begun to broaden the geographical and conceptual range of analysis for many diverse themes in American history--including such classic topics as the American Revolution, slavery, abolitionism, Reconstruction, labor activism, the destruction of Native American societies, Progressivism, the Civil Rights Movement, and Cold War politics.

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walbat (7), LunaSlashSea (6)
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