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Series: Cambridge Opera Handbooks

Series by cover

1–8 of 35 ( next | show all )
 
 

Works (35)

TitlesOrder
Alban Berg: Lulu by Douglas Jarman
Alban Berg: Wozzeck by Douglas Jarman
Benjamin Britten: Billy Budd by Mervyn Cooke
Benjamin Britten: Death in Venice by Donald Mitchell
Benjamin Britten: Peter Grimes by Philip Brett
Benjamin Britten: The Turn of the Screw by Patricia Howard
C. W. von Gluck: Orfeo by Patricia Howard
Claude Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande by Roger Nichols
Claudio Monteverdi: Orfeo by John Whenham
Georges Bizet: Carmen by Susan McClary
Giacomo Puccini, La Bohème by Arthur Groos
Giacomo Puccini: Tosca by Mosco Carner
Giuseppe Verdi: Falstaff by James A. Hepokoski
Giuseppe Verdi: Otello by James A. Hepokoski
Hector Berlioz: Les Troyens by Ian Kemp
Igor Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress by Paul Griffiths
Kurt Weill: The Threepenny Opera by Stephen Hinton
Leos Janácek: Kát'a Kabanová by John Tyrrell
Ludwig van Beethoven: Fidelio by Paul Robinson
Richard Strauss: Arabella by Kenneth Birkin
Richard Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier by Alan Jefferson
Richard Strauss: Elektra by Derrick Puffett
Richard Strauss: Salome by Derrick Puffett
Richard Wagner: Der Fliegende Holländer by Thomas Grey
Richard Wagner: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg by John Warrack
Richard Wagner: Parsifal by Lucy Beckett
Richard Wagner: Tristan und Isolde by Arthur Groos
Vincenzo Bellini: Norma by David R. B. Kimbell
W. A. Mozart: Così Fan Tutte by Bruce Alan Brown
W. A. Mozart: Die Entführung aus dem Serail by Thomas Bauman
W. A. Mozart: Die Zauberflöte by Peter Branscombe
W. A. Mozart: Don Giovanni (Cambridge Opera Handbooks) by Julian Rushton
W. A. Mozart: La Clemenza di Tito by John A. Rice
W. A. Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro by Tim Carter
W.A. Mozart, Idomeneo (Cambridge Opera Handbooks) by Julian Rushton

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Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

Helpers

scvlad (48), AnnaClaire (2), frindley (1)
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