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Series: Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library

Series by cover

1–7 of 7 ( show all )
 
 

Works (7)

TitlesOrder
Accounts of Medieval Constantinople: The Patria by Albrecht Berger
Apocalypse. An Alexandrian World Chronicle by Pseudo-Methodius
The History by Michael Attaleiates
Lives and Miracles (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library) by Gregory of Tours
Miracle Tales from Byzantium by Alice-Mary Talbot
On Difficulties in the Church Fathers: The Ambigua, Volume I (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library) by Maximos the Confessor
The Vulgate Bible, Volume IV: The Major Prophetical Books: Douay-Rheims Translation by Angela M. Kinney

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Recommendations

  1. On Difficulties in the Church Fathers: The Ambigua, Volume II (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library) by Maximos the Confessor (2014)
  2. John Skylitzes: A Synopsis of Byzantine History, 811-1057: Translation and Notes by John Skylitzes (2010)
  3. Christology After Chalcedon by Iain R. Torrance (1988)
  4. St. John Damascene: Tradition and Originality in Byzantine Theology by Andrew Louth (2002)
  5. O City of Byzantium, Annals of Niketas Choniates: Annals of Niketas Choniates (Byzantine Texts in Translation) by Niketas Acominatus Choniates (1984)
  6. The Chronicle of Theophanes: Anni Mundi 6095-6305, A.D. 602-813 by Harry Turtledove (1982)
  7. Writings by Saint of Damascus John (1958)
  8. St. John Chrysostom: Homilies on the Old Testament: Homilies on Isaiah and Jeremiah by Robert C. Hill (2007)
  9. The History of Leo the Deacon: Byzantine Military Expansion in the Tenth Century by Alice-Mary Talbot (2005)
  10. Constantine Porphyrogenitus: De Administrando Imperio by Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus (1967)
  11. The Works of Dionysius the Areopagite: (Forgotten Books) by Unknown (2007)
  12. Optatus: Against the Donatists by Mark Edwards (1997)
  13. The Early Byzantine Historians by Warren Treadgold (2007)
  14. Fourteen Byzantine Rulers: The Chronographia of Michael Psellus (Penguin Classics) by Michael Psellus (1966)
  15. St. John Chrysostom: Homilies on the Old Testament: Homilies on the Obscurity of the Old Testament; Homilies on the Psalms by Robert C. Hill (2007)

Series description

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Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

Helpers

AnnaClaire (5), David_Chef (3), BrianB (2)
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