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Series: In Action series

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Works (54)

TitlesOrder
ActiveMQ in Action by Bruce Snyder
Adobe AIR in Action by Joseph Lott
Ajax in Action by Dave Crane
Ant in Action by Steve Loughran
ASP.NET 2.0 Web Parts in Action: Building Dynamic Web Portals by Darren Neimke
AspectJ in Action: Enterprise AOP with Spring Applications by Ramnivas Laddad
AspectJ in Action: Practical Aspect-Oriented Programming by Ramnivas Laddad
Camel in Action by Claus Ibsen
Clojure in Action by Amit Rathore
Code Generation in Action by Jack Herrington
DSLs in Action by Debasish Ghosh
Eclipse in Action: A Guide for the Java Developer by David Gallardo
EJB 3 in Action by Debu Panda
Ext JS in Action by Jesus Garcia
Grails in Action by Glen Smith
Groovy in Action by Dierk Koenig
Hadoop in Action by Chuck Lam
HBase in Action by Nick Dimiduk
Hibernate in Action by Christian Bauer
HTML5 in Action by Rob Crowther
IntelliJ IDEA in Action by Duane K. Fields
iText in Action by Bruno Lowagie
Java Reflection in Action by Ira R. Forman
JavaServer Faces in Action by Kito Mann
JBoss in Action: Configuring the JBoss Application Server by Javid Jamae
Jess in Action: Java Rule-Based Systems by Ernest Friedman-Hill
JMX in Action by Benjamin G. Sullins
jQuery in Action by Bear Bibeault
jQuery in Action, Second Edition by Bear Bibeault
JSTL in Action by Shawn Bayern
JUnit in Action by Vincent Massol
Lucene in Action by Erik Hatcher
Mahout in Action by Sean Owen
Microsoft Reporting Services in Action by Teo Lachev
MongoDB in Action by Kyle Banker
Node.js in Action by Mike Cantelon
OSGi in Action: Creating Modular Applications in Java by Richard Hall
POJOs in Action: Developing Enterprise Applications with Lightweight Frameworks by Chris Richardson
R in Action by Robert Kabacoff
RabbitMQ in Action: Distributed Messaging for Everyone by Alvaro Videla
Redis in Action by Josiah L. Carlson
Seam in Action by Dan Allen
Silverlight 2 in Action by Chad A. Campbell
Silverlight 4 in Action by Pete Brown
Spring in Action by Craig Walls
Struts 2 in Action by Donald Brown
Struts in Action: Building Web Applications with the Leading Java Framework by Ted Husted
SWT/JFace in Action: GUI Design with Eclipse 3.0 by Matthew Scarpino
Tapestry in Action by Howard M. Lewis Ship
Tika in Action by Chris Mattmann
WebWork in Action by Patrick Lightbody
Wicket in Action by Martijn Dashorst
XDoclet in Action by Craig Walls
Zend Framework in Action by Rob Allen

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Series description

Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

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AnnaClaire (54)
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