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Series: Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice

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Works (30)

TitlesOrder
Abuse of Process and Judicial Stays of Criminal Proceedings (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Andrew L. T. Choo
The Adversarial Process and the Vulnerable Witness (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Criminal Justice.) by Louise Ellison
Appraising Strict Liability (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law & Justice) by Andrew Simester
Censure and Sanctions (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Andrew von Hirsch
Child Abuse: Law and Policy Across Boundaries by Laura Hoyano
Contrasting prisoners' rights : a comparative examination of Germany and England by Liora Lazarus
Corporations and criminal responsibility by Celia Wells
Crime and the Computer (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Martin Wasik
Criminal Attempts (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by R. A. Duff
The Criminal Justice System and Health Care (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Charles A. Erin
Criminal Responsibility (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law & Justice) by Victor Tadros
English Criminal Appeals 1844-1994: Appeals Against Conviction and Sentence in England and Wales by Rosemary Pattenden
The Ethics of Plea Bargaining (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Richard L. Lippke
Excusing Crime by Jeremy Horder
Fundamentals of Sentencing Theory: Essays in Honour of Andrew von Hirsch (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Andrew Ashworth
Harm and culpability by A. P. Simester
Hearsay and Confrontation in Criminal Trials (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Andrew L. T. Choo
Homicide and the Politics of Law Reform (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law & Justice) by Jeremy Horder
Jurisdiction and the Ambit of the Criminal Law (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Michael Hirst
Killing in Self-Defence (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Fiona Leverick
Lawyers, Legislators and Theorists: Developments in English Criminal Jurisprudence 1800-1957 (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by K. J. M. Smith
Lying, Cheating, and Stealing: A Moral Theory of White-Collar Crime (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Stuart P. Green
A Philosophy of Evidence Law: Justice in the Search for Truth (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Hock Lai Ho
Prosecuting Domestic Violence: A Philosophical Analysis (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Michelle Madden Dempsey
Provocation and responsibility by Jeremy Horder
Rape and the legal process by Jennifer Temkin
Rethinking English Homicide Law (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Andrew Ashworth
Rethinking Imprisonment (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Richard Lippke
Standing Accused: The Organization and Practices of Criminal Defence Lawyers in Britain (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Mike McConville
Understanding Miscarriages of Justice: Law, the Media, and the Inevitability of Crisis (Oxford Monographs on Criminal Law and Justice) by Richard Nobles

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Series description

Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

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MLister (30)
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