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Series: Technologies of Lived Abstraction

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TitlesOrder
Relationscapes: Movement, Art, Philosophy by Erin Manningbook 1
Without Criteria: Kant, Whitehead, Deleuze, and Aesthetics (Technologies of Lived Abstraction) by Steven Shavirobook 2
Sonic Warfare: Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear (Technologies of Lived Abstraction) by Steve Goodmanbook 3
Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts (Technologies of Lived Abstraction) by Brian Massumibook 4

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Series description

"What moves as a body, returns as the movement of thought."
Of subjectivity (in its nascent state)
Of the social (in its mutant state)
Of the environment (at the point it can be reinvented)
"A process set up anywhere reverberates everywhere."
The Technologies of Lived Abstraction book series is dedicated to work of transdisciplinary reach, inquiring critically but especially creatively into processes of subjective, social, and ethical-political emergence abroad in the world today. Thought and body, abstract and concrete, local and global, individual and collective: the works presented are not content to rest with the habitual divisions. They explore how these facets come formatively, reverberatively together, if only to form the movement by which they come again to differ.
Possible paradigms are many: autonomization, relation; emergence, complexity, process; individuation, (auto)poiesis; direct perception, embodied perception, perception-as-action; speculative pragmatism, speculative realism, radical empiricism; mediation, virtualization; ecology of practices, media ecology; technicity; micropolitics, biopolitics, ontopower. Yet there will be a common aim: to catch new thought and action dawning, at a creative crossing. Technologies of Lived Abstraction orients to the creativity at this crossing, in virtue of which life everywhere can be considered germinally aesthetic, and the aesthetic anywhere already political.
"Concepts must be experienced. They are lived."

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