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Series: The President's Position: Debating the Issues

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TitlesOrder
Presidents from Washington through Monroe, 1789-1825: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents by Amy H. Sturgis1
Presidents from Adams through Polk, 1825-1849: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents (The President's Position: Debating the Issues) by David A. Smith2
Presidents from Taylor through Grant, 1849-1877: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents (The President's Position: Debating the Issues) by Jeffrey W. Coker3
Presidents from Hayes through McKinley, 1877-1901: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents by Amy H. Sturgis4
Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt through Coolidge, 1901-1929: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents (The President's Position: Debating the Issues) by Francine Sanders Romero5
Presidents from Hoover through Truman, 1929-1953: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents (The President's Position: Debating the Issues) by John Moser6
Presidents from Eisenhower through Johnson, 1953-1969: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents (The President's Position: Debating the Issues) by John King7
Presidents from Nixon through Carter, 1969-1981: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents by Aimee D. Shouse8
Presidents from Reagan through Clinton, 1981-2001: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents by Lane Crothers9

Related tags

Recommendations

  1. The progressive Presidents : Roosevelt, Wilson, Roosevelt, Johnson by John Morton Blum (1980)
  2. The Presidential Character: Predicting Performance in the White House by James David Barber (1972)
  3. The 1912 Election and the Power of Progressivism: A Brief History with Documents by Brett Flehinger (2003)
  4. Theodore Roosevelt and the Assassin: Madness, Vengeance, and the Campaign of 1912 by Gerard Helferich (2013)
  5. 1912: Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs--The Election that Changed the Country by James Chace (2004)
  6. Hail to the Chiefs: Presidential Mischief, Morals, & Malarkey from George W. to George W. by Barbara Holland (1990)
  7. Remaking the Presidency: Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson, 1901-1916 by Peri E. Arnold (2009)
  8. Four Hats in the Ring: The 1912 Election and the Birth of Modern American Politics by Lewis L. Gould (2008)
  9. America's First Families: An Inside View of 200 Years of Private Life in the White House (Lisa Drew Books) by Carl Sferrazza Anthony (2000)
  10. Events That Changed America in the Eighteenth Century by John E. Findling (1998)
  11. Command of Office: How War, Secrecy, And Deception Transformed the Presidency, from Theodore Roosevelt to George W. Bush by Stephen Graubard (2004)
  12. The Parties Respond: Changes in American Parties and Campaigns by Louis Sandy Maisel (1994)
  13. 1920: The Year of the Six Presidents by David Pietrusza (2006)
  14. The Presidency of Calvin Coolidge by Robert H. Ferrell (1998)
  15. The Selected Letters of Theodore Roosevelt by Theodore Roosevelt (2001)

Series description

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Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

Helpers

BogAl (16), PhaedraB (2)
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