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Series: Turning Points in World History

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Works (53)

TitlesOrder
The American Frontier (Turning Points in World History) by James D. Torr
The American Revolution by Kirk D. Werner
American Slavery (Turning Points in World History) by William Dudley
Ancient Egyptian Civilization by Brenda Stalcup
The Assassination of Julius Caesar (Turning Points in World History) by George Ochoa
The Atom Bomb (Turning Points in World History) by Tamara L. Roleff
The Baby Boom (Turning Points in World History) by Stuart A. Kallen
The Berlin Wall (Turning Points in World History) by Lisa Mirabile
The Black Death (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
The Civil Rights Movement by Paul A. Winters
The Cold War by Derek Maus
The Collapse of the Soviet Union (Turning Points in World History) by Paul A. Winters
The Creation of the U.S. Constitution by Loreta M. Medina
The Crusades by Brenda Stalcup
The Cuban Missile Crisis: To the Brink of World War III (Point of Impact) by Fergus Fleming
The Decline and Fall of Ancient Greece (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
The Early Middle Ages by Jeff Hay
Elizabethan England (Turning Points in World History) by Laura Marvel
The End of Ancient Rome (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
The Enlightenment (Turning Points in World History) by Harold Maltz
The Fall of the Bastille (Turning Points in World History) by Kitty C. Benedict
The French Revolution (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
Generals who changed the world by Michael Pollard
Generals Who changed the World by Robert Ingpen
Generals Who Changed the World (Turning Points in History) by Philip Wilkinson
The Great Depression (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
The Holocaust by Mitchell G. Bard
Immigration by Jeff Hay
The Industrial Revolution by Brenda Stalcup
The Inquisition by Brenda Stalcup
The Meiji Restoration and the Rise of Modern Japan (Turning Points in World History) by Monique Avakian
North American Indian Wars (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
People Who Changed the World (Turning Points in History) by Philip Wilkinson
The Pyramid Builders (Turning Points in World History) by Carter Smith
The Reformation (Turning Points in World History) by Stephen P. Thompson
The Renaissance by Stephen P. Thompson
The Rise of Christianity (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
The Rise of Communism by Robert Sims
The Rise of Islamic Fundamentalism by Philip Margulies
The Rise of Nazi Germany (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
The Rise of the Roman Empire (Turning Points in World History) by Don Nardo
The Rise of the Soviet Union by Thomas Streissguth
The Roaring Twenties by Phillip Margulies
Scientific Revolution (Turning Points in World History) by Mitchell Young
Scientists Who Changed the World (Turning Points in History) by Philip Wilkinson
The Spread of Islam by Clarice Swisher
Statesmen Who Changed the World (Turning Points in History) by Philip Wilkinson
Victorian England (Turning Points in World History) by Clarice Swisher
The Vietnam War by Diane Yancey
The War on Terrorism by Mitch Young
Women's Suffrage by Brenda Stalcup
World War I by Donald J. Murphy
World War II by Myra Immel

Related tags

Recommendations

  1. A History of Christianity, Volume 1: To A.D. 1500 by Kenneth Scott Latourette (1975)
  2. The Blackest Streets: The Life and Death of a Victorian Slum by Sarah Wise (1600)
  3. The Black Death: A Turning Point in History? (European Problem Studies) by William M. Bowsky (1971)
  4. The Beginnings of Rome: Italy and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Punic Wars c.1000-264 BC by Tim Cornell (1995)
  5. Born for Liberty: A History of Women in America by Sara M. Evans (1989)
  6. Century of Struggle: The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States by Eleanor Flexner (1959)
  7. Scipio Africanus: Greater Than Napoleon by B. H. Liddell Hart (1971)
  8. The Great Mortality: An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly (2005)
  9. Daily Life in Victorian England by Sally Mitchell (1996)
  10. Christianity's Dangerous Idea: The Protestant Revolution--A History from the Sixteenth Century to the Twenty-First by Alister McGrath (2007)
  11. The Ghosts of Cannae: Hannibal and the Darkest Hour of the Roman Republic by Robert L. O'Connell (2010)
  12. Other Powers: The Age of Suffrage, Spiritualism, and the Scandalous Victoria Woodhull by Barbara Goldsmith (1998)
  13. City of Dreadful Delight: Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London by Judith R. Walkowitz (1992)
  14. The Punic Wars by Adrian Goldsworthy (2000)
  15. The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London by Judith Flanders (2012)

Series description

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Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

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