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Series: Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences Course in Dressmaking and Designing

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Works (14)

TitlesOrder
First Steps in Dressmaking by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences01D
Harmony in Dress by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences02D
Cutting and Fitting by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences03D
Dressmaking, Trimming, Finishing by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences04D
Sewing Materials by Women's Institue of Domestic Arts and Sciences05D
Underwear and lingerie by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences06D
Home sewing by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences07D
Decorative Stitches and Trimmings (Embroidery and Decorative Stitches - Ribbon and Fabric Trimmings) by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences08D
Children's and maternity garments by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences09D
Laundering and Dry Cleaning by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences10D
Principles of Tailoring: Essentials of Tailoring Tailored Seams and Plackets Tailored Buttonholes, Buttons, and Trimmings Tailored Pockets, Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences by Mary Brooks Picken11D
Dyeing, Remodeling, Budgets by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences12D
Designing and decorating clothes by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences14D
Sewing for profit: The dressmaker and tailor shop. Specializing in sewing by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences16D

Related tags

Recommendations

  1. Tailored Garments by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sciences (1928)
  2. Art of Dressmaking by Butterick (1927)
  3. 59 Authentic Turn-of-the-Century Fashion Patterns by Kristina Harris (1994)
  4. Patterns of Fashion 2: Englishwomen's Dresses and their Construction, c. 1860-1940 by Janet Arnold (1972)
  5. Ribbon Trimmings: A Course in 6 Parts by Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts & Sci (1992)
  6. High Fashion Sewing Secrets from the World's Best Designers: A Step-By-Step Guide to Sewing Stylish Seams, Buttonholes, Pockets, Collars, Hems, And More by Claire B. Shaeffer (1997)
  7. Historic English Costumes and How to Make Them by Talbot Hughes (1932)
  8. Vogue easy sewing by Lynn C. Ferrari (1985)
  9. Designing Apparel Through the Flat Pattern by Ernestine Kopp (1971)
  10. Authentic Victorian Fashion Patterns: A Complete Lady's Wardrobe by Kristina Harris (1999)
  11. Modern Pattern Design: The Complete Guide to the Creation of Patterns as a Means of Designing Smart Wearing Apparel by Harriet Pepin (1942)
  12. The Complete Book of Tailoring by Adele P. Margolis (1964)
  13. The Voice of Fashion: 79 Turn-Of-The-Century Patterns, with Instructions and Fashion Plates by Frances Grimble (1998)
  14. Dressing The Bride by Larry Goldman (1993)
  15. Golden Hands Complete Book of Dressmaking by Elizabeth Baker (1973)

Series description

Series?!

How do series work?

To create a series or add a work to it, go to a "work" page. The "Common Knowledge" section now includes a "Series" field. Enter the name of the series to add the book to it.

Works can belong to more than one series. In some cases, as with Chronicles of Narnia, disagreements about order necessitate the creation of more than one series.

Tip: If the series has an order, add a number or other descriptor in parenthesis after the series title (eg., "Chronicles of Prydain (book 1)"). By default, it sorts by the number, or alphabetically if there is no number. If you want to force a particular order, use the | character to divide the number and the descriptor. So, "(0|prequel)" sorts by 0 under the label "prequel."

What isn't a series?

Series was designed to cover groups of books generally understood as such (see Wikipedia: Book series). Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. For now, avoid forcing the issue with mere "lists" of works possessing an arbitrary shared characteristic, such as relating to a particular place. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (eg., avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

Also avoid publisher series, unless the publisher has a true monopoly over the "works" in question. So, the Dummies guides are a series of works. But the Loeb Classical Library is a series of editions, not of works.

Helpers

papyri (28), SimoneA (24)
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