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fuzzi's attempt at 75 in 2012 (Will she succeed? Inquiring minds want to know!)

75 Books Challenge for 2012

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1fuzzi
Edited: Dec 30, 2011, 1:19pm Top

Just trying out this concept.

Do 'rereads' count?

2fuzzi
Dec 30, 2011, 1:42pm Top

First book of the New Year was started last night, The Paladin by CJ Cherryh.

I've never read this book before, but it's by my favorite author.

3majkia
Edited: Dec 30, 2011, 3:10pm Top

Hah! Someone who's been to Niceville! Glad to know you.

Also, my better half's family is in Eastern NC. Williamston.

4kgodey
Dec 30, 2011, 5:25pm Top

I think rereads count if you want them to! :)

5RosyLibrarian
Dec 30, 2011, 6:45pm Top

1: I most definitely think they count. The best books are ones you can take away something different each time.

6jnwelch
Dec 30, 2011, 6:51pm Top

I agree. Good luck, fuzzi!

7fuzzi
Dec 30, 2011, 6:59pm Top

majkia, Williamston isn't too far, about an hour's drive from here.

There's a town called "Bear Grass" not too far away...gotta love these descriptive names!

8fuzzi
Edited: Dec 30, 2011, 7:16pm Top

Okay, let's see how this works...


9scvlad
Dec 30, 2011, 7:56pm Top

Don't look now, but there's a frog sitting on your staff. And he's covering the key signature. What do we do?

10jdthloue
Dec 30, 2011, 7:57pm Top

Aww, that ticker looks cute!

;-}

11fuzzi
Dec 30, 2011, 8:40pm Top

Thanks, jdthloue. I wanted a kitty, but couldn't find one I liked.

12jdthloue
Dec 30, 2011, 8:44pm Top

There are too many choices there at Ticker Factory....I know

...and please, call me Jude

;-}

13drneutron
Dec 30, 2011, 9:11pm Top

Welcome!

It's your thread, so rereads count if you want them to...

14fuzzi
Dec 30, 2011, 9:50pm Top

"Hey Jude, don't make it bad..." :D

Thanks for the welcome, drneutron.

Maybe I should get offline and get reading? ;)

15alcottacre
Dec 31, 2011, 12:54am Top

Welcome to the group!

This is your thread, so your rules. If you want to count re-reads, do :)

16fuzzi
Dec 31, 2011, 5:59pm Top

Wow...

"I've got the power....!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImQoQTVvNJk

17alcottacre
Dec 31, 2011, 11:19pm Top

Happy New Year!

18fuzzi
Dec 31, 2011, 11:47pm Top

Happy New Year to all!

Ladies and gentlemen, start reading!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

19fuzzi
Dec 31, 2011, 11:51pm Top

While taking my shower today (do any of you also do some thinking while bathing?) it came to me that LT, especially the 75 Book Challenge area, is something akin to what our elementary school teachers tried to get us to do: read books and then do BOOK REPORTS!

I never had a problem with reading assignments in school, unless the books were really awful. I remember back in high school we had to read The Turn of the Screw, and I developed an intense dislike for it and the characters within. I never finished the book, but managed to pass the test.

20fuzzi
Edited: Jan 1, 2012, 12:04am Top

January goals (in no particular order):

1. Paladin by CJ Cherryh (started it a couple days ago)
2. Pirate King by Laurie R. King
3. Silas Marner (reread) by George Eliot
4. The Virginian by Owen Wister
5. Hammerfall by CJ Cherryh
6. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

and if I can manage it

7. Mustang: Wild Spirit of the West by Marguerite Henry

This list is subject to change, depending on what books arrive at my door, and what I see at the library... :D

21alcottacre
Jan 1, 2012, 2:14am Top

#20: This list is subject to change, depending on what books arrive at my door, and what I see at the library...

Spoken like a true 75er!

22thornton37814
Jan 1, 2012, 8:38am Top

Yes - I love the disclaimer!

Re: LT and Book Reports - I've thought about that in the past. Any time book reports were assigned in school, people cringed. I don't write nearly as long of "reports" as we were expected to give in school. They are more like the "cards" we kept in the YA literature class I took in library school. However, I love the fact that I now have something written that helps me remember the book and my impressions of it better.

23fuzzi
Jan 1, 2012, 8:53am Top

(22) And your impressions of it also help others to decide whether or not to read it!

You've got a big responsibility there, hmm?

(21) I'm glad I fit in... :D

24fuzzi
Jan 1, 2012, 8:18pm Top

The Paladin is done, and what a read! Woo! I loved it.

It's not really sci fi, and really not fantasy except it doesn't take place here on earth as we know it.

A waif shows up at the retirement retreat of a warrior in exile, wanting to be trained in skills so that revenge upon someone who killed the waif's family can be accomplished.

The waif turns out to be a girl, and the story gets very interesting.

As usual, CJ Cherryh has done a superb job with characters and situations.


25streamsong
Jan 1, 2012, 8:35pm Top

Congrats on finishing your first book of the year!

I've got you starred and will be checking in with you.

26alcottacre
Jan 2, 2012, 4:13am Top

Note to self: Must read some of C.J. Cherryh's books.

Glad to see your reading year is off to a good start!

27fuzzi
Jan 2, 2012, 11:35am Top

Thanks!

I picked up Silas Marner last night (a reread, but not read it in years!) and got about 1/2 way through before falling asleep.

However, this morning I looked at a book I've had but not read, Sixpence in Her Shoe and started reading it as well. What a gem! It's about marriage and relationships and the traditional 'housewife'. While it was written in 1960, it has a lot of truth in it as I can see from being married for 31 years myself.

But I'll pick up again Silas later today (yippee!! one more day of vacation!).

28fuzzi
Edited: Jan 3, 2012, 8:08am Top

Two down...I finished Silas Marner last night.

Maybe I'll try something else by George Eliot: not a few people here on LT have mentioned Middlemarch as a really good read.

Hmm?




29fuzzi
Jan 3, 2012, 6:40pm Top

Didn't get by the library to check out Middlemarch, so I'm going to finish reading Sixpence in Her Shoe, which I started dipping into yesterday.

If you remember the 60s, you very well might enjoy this book.

31alcottacre
Jan 3, 2012, 10:48pm Top

I love Middlemarch, so I hope you get to it some time!

32fuzzi
Jan 4, 2012, 12:42pm Top

Okay, y'all have talked me into it. I'll see if the library has Middlemarch.

However, I have already borrowed Hammerfall, so I'd need to read that next, before Middlemarch.

I love this place! I'm getting so many suggestions for books to read. :)

33alcottacre
Jan 4, 2012, 1:50pm Top

Suggestions for books to read are never a problem with this group!

34fuzzi
Jan 4, 2012, 6:51pm Top

I did it! I stopped by the library and borrowed Middlemarch.

But Hammerfall will come first, it'll be due first!

And I'm not quite finished with Sixpence in Her Shoe. I did not realize that the author, Phyllis McGinley was a Pulitzer Prize winner! Wow.

35alcottacre
Jan 4, 2012, 9:27pm Top

well, I hope you enjoy Middlemarch when you get to it!

36fuzzi
Jan 5, 2012, 12:19pm Top

I'll probably finish up Sixpence in Her Shoe tonight, and then I'll start Hammerfall, probably...

...order to TBR books may vary... ;)

37alcottacre
Jan 5, 2012, 7:31pm Top

I hate trying to order TBR books. My mood is so variable I cannot hamstring myself like that.

38fuzzi
Jan 5, 2012, 7:49pm Top

My TBR list will just keep changing as needed!

39alcottacre
Jan 5, 2012, 9:37pm Top

Sounds good to me!

40fuzzi
Jan 6, 2012, 8:08am Top

Fell asleep while reading Sixpence in Her Shoe last night (not a reflection upon the book but upon my fatigue).

It keeps getting better and better, with lots of social commentary and insight. It's quite refreshing.

41fuzzi
Edited: Jan 7, 2012, 1:07pm Top

I finished Sixpence in Her Shoe last night, and really really enjoyed it.

Hammerfall is waiting for me, but I also picked up some books this morning at the Habitat for Humanity store:

All the Weyrs of Pern
The Black Pearl by Scott O'Dell (never read that one!)
Queenie Peavey (the fact that I found this book for sale a couple days after figuring out the title of a book I read as a child is too weird!)
The Gulag Archipelago books 2 and 3 (never read, either)

Time to make the donuts...



42fuzzi
Jan 7, 2012, 7:16pm Top

I reread Queenie Peavey this afternoon:


43alcottacre
Jan 8, 2012, 3:47am Top

#41: Nice haul! I hope you enjoy the books.

44fuzzi
Edited: Jan 16, 2012, 1:41pm Top

Thanks, alcottacre!

Finished The Black Pearl and started Hammerfall last night.

The first was okay, I gave it three stars.

However, I can already tell that Hammerfall is going to be really good...I love how CJ Cherryh tells a story!

45alcottacre
Jan 8, 2012, 6:09pm Top

I have only read one of Cherryh's books, Downbelow Station, and that was an eon ago. Peggy (LizzieD) has been encouraging me to read more of her books. I guess I need to soon.

46fuzzi
Edited: Jan 9, 2012, 4:54pm Top

You do! You do!!!

I have liked almost everything she's written, although I've had a hard time getting into Cyteen. I will try it again, though.

Did you know she's won three (3) Hugo awards? Not bad, hmm?

Best Short Story
1979—"Cassandra"
Best Novel
1982— Downbelow Station
1989— Cyteen

47fuzzi
Edited: Jan 16, 2012, 1:42pm Top

Woo! I made the time and finished reading Hammerfall. Excellent book, and I'm eager to read the sequel, Forge of Heaven.

However, before I do, Middlemarch awaits.

And I just got a copy of Finity's End, which I haven't read in a long time and want to reread....decisions, decisions..


48fuzzi
Edited: Jan 16, 2012, 1:43pm Top

Completed the Bible's book of Genesis this morning, so I'm adding it as a book (hey, it's 50 chapters long, it should count as a book, right???).

And I've started Finity's End...Middlemarch will probably be next...we'll see...




49fuzzi
Jan 16, 2012, 1:57pm Top

Time to edit the January reading list:

1. Paladin by CJ Cherryh - done
2. Silas Marner (reread) by George Eliot - done
3. Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley - done
4. Queenie Peavy by Robert Burch - done
5. The Black Pearl by Scott O'Dell - done
6. Hammerfall by CJ Cherryh - done
7. The Bible: book of Genesis - done

8. Finity's End by CJ Cherryh (currently reading)

Still waiting in the wings:

9. Middlemarch by George Eliot
10. Forge of Heaven by CJ Cherryh (sequel to Hammerfall)
11. The Virginian by Owen Wister
12. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
13. Mustang: Wild Spirit of the West by Marguerite Henry
14. Pirate King by Laurie R. King

50fuzzi
Edited: Jan 21, 2012, 6:54pm Top

Woo! I finished Finity's End, as usual, a great read from CJ Cherryh.

Next up....Middlemarch.


51alcottacre
Jan 22, 2012, 1:20am Top

#9: You have some great reading waiting there in the wings! I love Middlemarch and All Quiet on the Western Front and, although very different in tone from the other books in the series, Pirate King. I read The Virginian a couple of years ago and liked it too.

52fuzzi
Jan 22, 2012, 2:33pm Top

(51) alcottacre, it's the people here at LT who have inspired me to try some different books, many of them which I have never even heard of before, like Middlemarch and 84, Charing Cross Road.

This place is both a danger and a blessing... ;)

53fuzzi
Edited: Jan 28, 2012, 4:32pm Top

Still reading Middlemarch and enjoying it, but I picked up some other books this week and decided to read Because of Winn Dixie last night. What a delight, what a joy!

Time to update the ticker...


54PamFamilyLibrary
Jan 28, 2012, 5:43pm Top

Hi! Gotcha starred. I really like your book selections. Nicely varied :)

ps--love CJ. Didn't like Hammerfall though. It was the first book of her's that fell into the no-category. Have you read Regenesis, the followup to Cyteen?

55fuzzi
Edited: Jan 28, 2012, 6:33pm Top

Pam, thanks for your compliment and 'starring'. :)

I can't say Hammerfall was my favorite book by CJ, but I am going to read the second book in the series or at least give it a try.

I did not read Cyteen, although I've tried a couple of times. Is Cyteen a prerequisite to read Regenesis?

56fuzzi
Edited: Jan 30, 2012, 7:11pm Top

January Update

1. Paladin by CJ Cherryh - done
2. Silas Marner (reread) by George Eliot - done
3. Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley - done
4. Queenie Peavy (reread) by Robert Burch - done
5. The Black Pearl by Scott O'Dell - done
6. Hammerfall by CJ Cherryh - done
7. The Bible (reread) book of Genesis - done
8. Finity's End (reread) by CJ Cherryh - done
9. Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo - done
10. Snow Dog by Jim Kjelgaard - done
11. The Bible (reread) book of Exodus - done
12. Middlemarch by George Eliot (currently reading)
13. Forge of Heaven by CJ Cherryh (sequel to Hammerfall)
14. The Story of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo (based upon #9)
15. The Virginian by Owen Wister
16. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
17. Mustang: Wild Spirit of the West by Marguerite Henry
18. Pirate King by Laurie R. King

(updated 1/30/12)

57LizzieD
Jan 28, 2012, 6:56pm Top

>46 fuzzi: & 55 Fuzzi, DO read Cyteen. I had to read 288 pp to get into it, but on p. 289 , I was smitten and couldn't put it down until the end. I like it a lot better than Donwbelow Station, for instance. You do have to read Cyteen before Regenesis, I think. I'm impressed with your Cherryh reading - haven't read any on your list. I am currently trying to make room for The Pride of Chanur, which I need to reread so that I can explore more in that world.

58PamFamilyLibrary
Jan 29, 2012, 8:45am Top

>55 fuzzi:

That's so weird. I left a reply last night but it's not here. (I wonder --and dread-- if I screwed up and left it on some other thread)

IAC, I didn't read Cyteen and had no problem thoroughly enjoying Regenesis. The story made perfect sense to me and, in fact, it's motivated me to try the other books again. (Like you, I have tried a couple of times to get into them, but failed.)

59fuzzi
Edited: Jan 30, 2012, 7:08pm Top

(57) Lizzie, I will try Cyteen again. I have the first two books of the restructured three volumes of that massive tome, so I'll only have to go to the library to borrow the third.

I love the Chanur books, probably more than any of CJ's other books!

Thanks for the input, Pam. You might have done what I have: previewed a message but then forgot to post it!

I read more in Middlemarch last night, getting to the second part, after the marriage of you-know-who. This morning I woke up early and was unable to sleep, so I grabbed a re-read to wake me up, Snow Dog by James Kjelgaard. One more to add to the list:




60fuzzi
Jan 29, 2012, 1:45pm Top

Oh, how could I forget? I finished the Bible's book of Exodus last night. At forty chapters, I think it should count as a book, right? :)


61PamFamilyLibrary
Jan 29, 2012, 5:04pm Top

59>

Yikes. You're probably right. That's likely what I did.

62countrylife
Jan 31, 2012, 4:43pm Top

Thanks for stopping by my thread, fuzzi. I just took a look at your profile and see many similarities between us: 3 decades married to one man, somewhat adult children, Goodwill book shopping, avoidance of facebook and twitter, and a fondness for stories that don't include scarey or steamy. As it happens, I'm doing a front to back read for my Bible reading this year, too, or rather September to September. I'm at Ruth, right now, and a little behind schedule. I remember enjoying Judges more than I expected to, not so much with Leviticus...

63fuzzi
Jan 31, 2012, 7:42pm Top

(62) How interesting, nice to "meet" you countrylife.

I love Ruth, and yes, Leviticus is a tad dry, but I'll get something out of it. If I can get past Leviticus, Deuteronomy and the dry part of Numbers, I'm good, until Chronicles, which I tend to bog down in as well. I like reading most of the prophets and the NT.

I've read my Bible 'through' before, can you tell? :D

64thornton37814
Jan 31, 2012, 9:11pm Top

Leviticus is always a tough one. You are correct that Chronicles is also tough. Our pastor challenged us to read the New Testament in 40 days starting January 1. I'm on track now. Only 9 days to go!

65fuzzi
Edited: Feb 1, 2012, 12:26pm Top

Go thornton, go! Let us know how you do.

FYI, I've read up to Leviticus 12, as of last night.

Aaron's sons, Nadab and Abihu, have met a fate that is similar to that of Uzza in 1 Chronicles 13:9. Ouch.

66fuzzi
Edited: Feb 3, 2012, 7:35am Top

I need input:

I have counted Genesis and Exodus books from my Bible as 'stand alone' books, due to their length.

I just finished Leviticus. Genesis was 50 chapters, Exodus was 40 chapters long, but Leviticus was only 27 chapters.

Should I count it as a book?

When I get to the shorter books in the Bible, such as Ruth (which is only 4 chapters long), I am not going to count them as whole books read.

But I'm not sure about Leviticus. Was it long enough to count as a whole book?

Waddayathink?

67fuzzi
Edited: Feb 5, 2012, 3:15pm Top

Last night I needed a light distraction, and Middlemarch was not going to be it, so I reread Irish Red.

Without Leviticus, here's the latest:


68fuzzi
Feb 3, 2012, 7:56am Top

On a personal note:

My uncle was just diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer a couple of weeks ago. My aunt sent me an email last night: tests have now revealed that it has already metastasized to the brain and liver, and he's having seizures.

I might be on here less frequently, or more, depending on how I feel and if I can go see him. Right now I'm in tears.

If any of you are praying sorts, I would greatly appreciate your prayers. If not, good thoughts are welcome too.

Thank you.

69The_Hibernator
Feb 3, 2012, 7:58am Top

I'll pray for your uncle! I hope things get better quickly!

70PamFamilyLibrary
Feb 3, 2012, 1:26pm Top

I will pray for your family. You all need some extra strength now.

71drneutron
Feb 3, 2012, 7:08pm Top

I'm the praying sort and am sad to hear about your uncle. We'll definitely pray for him and your family.

72fuzzi
Feb 3, 2012, 7:18pm Top

Thank you, so much. :)

73streamsong
Feb 4, 2012, 9:21am Top

I'm also adding my prayers for you and your family.

I also haven't decided how to count my Bible reading. I think I'll create (yet another) separate counter.

74fuzzi
Feb 4, 2012, 2:18pm Top

Thank you for your prayers, they are appreciated!

As far as Bible reading, that's not a bad idea, streamsong! In fact, I think it's a great idea!

75fuzzi
Edited: Feb 5, 2012, 3:16pm Top

Counter updated, with Bible books removed:



76fuzzi
Feb 4, 2012, 2:27pm Top

Okay, y'all can laugh at me. I did not realize that I could just click on my counter and update it. I've been going to the ticker site and redoing it every time I added a book.

Well, duh. I didn't know.

Update on my book list:

1. Paladin by CJ Cherryh - done
2. Silas Marner (reread) by George Eliot - done
3. Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley - done
4. Queenie Peavy (reread) by Robert Burch - done
5. The Black Pearl by Scott O'Dell - done
6. Hammerfall by CJ Cherryh - done
7. Finity's End (reread) by CJ Cherryh - done
8. Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo - done
9. Snow Dog by Jim Kjelgaard - done
10. Irish Red by Jim Kjelgaard - done
11. Middlemarch by George Eliot (currently reading)
12. A Christian Manifesto by Francis Schaeffer (currently reading)
13. Forge of Heaven by CJ Cherryh (sequel to Hammerfall)
14. The Story of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo (based upon #9)
15. The Virginian by Owen Wister
16. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
17. Mustang: Wild Spirit of the West by Marguerite Henry

It keeps changing...is that normal for the rest of you?

77LShelby
Feb 4, 2012, 6:38pm Top

"It keeps changing...is that normal for the rest of you?"

My books finished list doesn't change except to get things added to it. As for the rest... I personally never bother to make a list of what I plan to read next.

Although, in general, if there are currently any library books in a stack by my bed (this is a frequent occurrence) then I'm hoping to start reading them soon. Otherwise they will go back to the library unread, and I will feel awfully silly. :)

78scaifea
Feb 5, 2012, 10:20am Top

Oh, I'm so so sorry to hear about your uncle - I'll be keeping him and you and your family in my thoughts.

79Donna828
Feb 5, 2012, 10:32am Top

Hi Fuzzi, I've been trying to keep up with the new people here on the 75 Book Challenge. Welcome to the group! I'm sorry about the bad news regarding your uncle. You and your family will be in my prayers.

That's funny about the ticker. I have a love/hate relationship with mine. Last year it completely conked out on me. So far my two tickers have been cooperating nicely. This group is nonjudgmental and very helpful with advice. Don't be afraid to ask about (most) anything. ;-)

80fuzzi
Feb 5, 2012, 3:18pm Top

Thank you scaifea and Donna for your kindness.

I just had to 'fix' it again, because my Bible reading ticker was here instead of my 75 book challenge 'frog' ticker. Hmm.

Last night I read A Christian Manifesto cover to cover, and I was really, REALLY impressed. Wow, double wow.

So, I should be up to 11 books now, let's see if this works:


81fuzzi
Edited: Feb 6, 2012, 12:40pm Top

I picked up a new book last night, A Bear Called Paddington, which I had never read as a child, nor read to my children.

I enjoyed it very, very much. Fun and quick read.


82fuzzi
Feb 6, 2012, 7:09pm Top

My ER book came, Jonah's Whale by Eileen Spinelli. I think I'll read that tonight. :)

83fuzzi
Feb 7, 2012, 12:52pm Top

Read Jonah's Whale last night, a fun book.

The story was retold very well, and the illustrations were gorgeous.

You can check out my review here:

http://www.librarything.com/work/11804213

84fuzzi
Feb 8, 2012, 7:33pm Top

Middlemarch still needs to be finished. It's taking a long time, but it's because it's not a quick read, it needs focus.

Needed a quick read last night before read, picked up Alas, Babylon. I liked it as much in 2012 as I did back when I first read it, about 1972. Whew.


85fuzzi
Feb 8, 2012, 7:34pm Top

For those who have been sending their well-wishes, thank you. I have not heard back from my aunt with an update on my uncle's current condition.

86fuzzi
Feb 11, 2012, 12:28pm Top

Finished Beautiful Joe last night, and was very disappointed. Reading it as a child, I did not pick up on how preachy it was, like Black Beauty to the 100th power! It will be donated to the thrift store next week, to be resold to someone who might appreciate its contrived plot.

Went to the library last night after work, and picked up The Homecoming by Earl Hamner Jr.. If you've seen the movie, starring Patricia O'Neal, then you know what's in the book, because the movie was pretty faithful to the original story.

Would I reread it? Yes. Would I want a copy? Hmm, I don't think so.

Two more books to add to the ticker:


87fuzzi
Feb 12, 2012, 3:05pm Top

I didn't feel like reading much (!!!!!!!!!!!) as I have been ill, so I picked up something I thought I'd enjoy, based upon past experience: At Wit's End.

I just didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would. I'm at the halfway point, and am considering just putting it down. It's not that it's bad, it's just very, very dated. Oh well.

Still 'stuck' at 16 books...

88fuzzi
Edited: Feb 14, 2012, 6:51pm Top

Still sick, not felt like reading much (I know, it's terrible), so I have been watching the BBC Poldark series on DVD. I'm enjoying it almost as much as I have enjoyed the books.

Quick reads in the last two days:

Golden Mare (not a children's book, a very good story for adults!)
Ramona and Her Mother (reread)

Everything else I've picked up I've put down again.


89LShelby
Feb 17, 2012, 9:07am Top

I'm sorry to hear that you are still under the weather.

I usually read much more when I'm sick. Of course, they're usually rereads of my favorite light fiction. But I figure the whole point of having "comfort reads" is to make you feel better when your all bleargh.

90fuzzi
Edited: Feb 17, 2012, 11:06am Top

LShelby, thank you very much for your kind thoughts.

On Thursday morning I went to one of the doctors I work for, and he diagnosed pneumonia, also referred to as "walking pneumonia". I've been home since but just don't feel like more than a "comfort read" as you put it. So, I have been going through the Poldark series by Winston Graham, which I have enjoyed so much in the past.

The Renegade (aka "Ross Poldark") is under my belt (completed, 19 books to date), and I'm a good portion into Demelza at this time. I've also finished watching the first series of the Poldark saga, done so well by the BBC in 1975.

Thank you again.

91ronincats
Feb 17, 2012, 11:27am Top

Hope you are feeling better soon. Please take good care of yourself. I know, there is sick when you can enjoy reading, and there is sick where you don't feel like doing anything.

92LShelby
Feb 17, 2012, 12:37pm Top

#90 I'm glad you got yourself diagnosed, and I hope you are now on the road to recovery. ::crosses fingers:: Take care of yourself!

93scaifea
Feb 17, 2012, 10:01pm Top

Chiming in to add my gladness that you've gone to the doctor and are hopefully on the road to recovery. Get well sooner than soon!

94fuzzi
Feb 19, 2012, 2:19pm Top

Thanks again to all who have been sending well wishes, thoughts and prayers. I'm better, but still feeling tired and weak.

Finished Demelza last night. The ticker won't update, but I'm now up to 20 read.

95fuzzi
Feb 20, 2012, 1:08pm Top

Read List (Updated)
1. Paladin by CJ Cherryh - done
2. Silas Marner (reread) by George Eliot - done
3. Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley - done
4. Queenie Peavy (reread) by Robert Burch - done
5. The Black Pearl by Scott O'Dell - done
6. Hammerfall by CJ Cherryh - done
7. Finity's End (reread) by CJ Cherryh - done
8. Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo - done
9. Snow Dog (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
10. Irish Red (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
11. A Christian Manifesto by Francis Schaeffer - done
12. The Story of Paddington by Michael Bond - done
13. Jonah's Whale by Eileen Spinelli - done
14. Alas, Babylon (reread) by Pat Frank - done
15. Beautiful Joe (reread) by Marshall Saunders - done
16. The Homecoming by Earl Hamner, Jr. - done
17. Golden Mare by William Corbin - done
18. Ramona and Her Mother (reread) by Beverly Cleary - done
19. The Renegade (reread) by Winston Graham - done
20. Demelza (reread) by Winston Graham - done
21. Theological Studies 2 by Peter S. Ruckman (currently reading)

And upcoming...

22. Forge of Heaven by CJ Cherryh (sequel to Hammerfall)
23. Heavy Time by CJ Cherryh
24. The Virginian by Owen Wister
25. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
26. Mustang: Wild Spirit of the West by Marguerite Henry

TBR list is subject to change without prior notice.... of course!

96fuzzi
Edited: Feb 25, 2012, 6:43pm Top

Still working on Theological Studies 2 (big book) and enjoying it.

Last night I read a new book, Is Our English Bible Inspired? by Sam Gipp.

And this afternoon I started Heavy Time by CJ Cherryh. She's just unbelievably good in all she writes!

Added one to the ticker:




97fuzzi
Feb 26, 2012, 5:11pm Top

Heavy Time is complete, another great book by CJ Cherryh.

I'll probably start reading Hellburner next.

Ticker updated to 22. :)

98fuzzi
Mar 2, 2012, 6:47pm Top

Hellburner done, and reviewed. I liked it, but not quite as much as Heavy Time.

I had to return Forge of Heaven to the library, I'll take it out again, soon.

Not sure what I'll be reading tonight....maybe I'll start The Virginian, it depends on what tickles my fancy when I sit down by the bookshelves...

99fuzzi
Mar 5, 2012, 1:16pm Top

Update: reading The Virginian and really enjoying it!

100fuzzi
Edited: Mar 10, 2012, 4:38pm Top

Coyote, the Wonder Wolf arrived yesterday, so I just had to read it immediately!

I reviewed it just a few minutes ago. :)

The copy I purchased from abebooks is a used hardcover with the original dustjacket in good to very good condition, and it's a first edition. Wow. I am overwhelmed...

101streamsong
Mar 10, 2012, 5:44pm Top

Hi fuzzi;

I love the old books, too. I love combing second hand stores and searching online for all those good old favorites from years back.

Sometimes, LT seems to be more about the new ones than the old ones... glad to see the new 'Tatterred but Lovely' group.

I see Cherryh is a favorite of several here on LT. I'll keep my eyes peeled and see if I can't pick up one or two of your suggestions.

102Meredy
Mar 10, 2012, 7:02pm Top

Nearly a third of the way in so short a time! Nice going, fuzzi.

When I look at people's reading journals, I can't always think of much to say in response. I often wish they'd include a one-line comment on each book, or maybe even make comparisons among works. Often what I'm wondering is "Would I like this too?"

103eclecticdodo
Mar 11, 2012, 12:41pm Top

Hi Fuzzi
Just checking in. Sorry to read you had such a hard time in february, I didn't realise. How are things now? I'll be praying for you.
Well done to have read so many books already. Keep going - I'm sure you'll make it to 75!

104fuzzi
Mar 11, 2012, 7:20pm Top

(101) streamsong, I adore CJ Cherryh's works, almost without exception, and I encourage others to give her books a try.

I like the "Tattered But Lovely" group as well.

(102) Meredy, I've seen others here do short reviews in their challenge threads, but I might try doing that in the future. I do review the books, though, and you can find the reviews on the book's page. :)

(103) eclecticdodo, thank you for your kind words and prayers. I always appreciate prayers.

Today was the first Sunday in a month that I was able to go to church and see my "family" there (I feel so much closer to most of my fellow church members than my own 'blood' family!). I even got to hold one of the newest attendees, Victoria, for the better part of Sunday School...she's 4 months old and I enjoyed it very much.

105maggie1944
Mar 11, 2012, 8:11pm Top

Hi, fuzzi! Aren't babies just the best! I'll be lurking by from time to time, don't often have much to say but I'll be watching you....

106fuzzi
Mar 12, 2012, 12:32pm Top

::waves to maggie::

Nice to see you! Thanks for stopping by. :)

107streamsong
Mar 17, 2012, 3:08pm Top

No new books for a week? You feeling OK??????? ;-)

108fuzzi
Mar 17, 2012, 8:02pm Top

I know, I know...there's been so much going on in my life, my reading time has suffered. Last night I read my "Birds and Blooms" magazine (I love it!) but I'm hoping to spend some time with The Virginian tonight. :)

I borrowed a book from a friend today that I had heard was good: One More Night With the Frogs, a series of messages preached by evangelists. It should be a fairly quick read, too.

And then, The Great Santini is waiting on my night stand...I borrowed it from the library and will have to get to it soon!

109souloftherose
Mar 20, 2012, 5:37pm Top

Hi fuzzi, just found your thread. Sorry to hear you had such a tough month - glad to hear you managed to make it to church and get some baby cuddling :-)

Despite many LT recommendations and three books by Cherryh in my TBR pile I still haven't read anything she's written...

110fuzzi
Edited: Mar 20, 2012, 5:56pm Top

Thanks, souloftherose.

What three books by CJ Cherryh do you have?

111souloftherose
Mar 20, 2012, 6:09pm Top

#110 Checking my catalogue it seems I have two books, one of which is a trilogy omnibus which contains three novels, so in no way could I be said to have three books by Cherryh - I have no idea where that number came from.

They are The Faded Sun Trilogy and Foreigner. I'm reluctant to start Foreigner because if it's as good as people say then I'll want to read the rest of the series, not sure why I haven't read The Faded Sun Trilogy.

112fuzzi
Mar 20, 2012, 6:18pm Top

I've not yet read The Faded Sun Trilogy either, but I do have it on my shelf.

I read Foreigner years ago, when it was first published, and loved it. I read two sequels before I got distracted...and now I see she's written another 8 or 9!

If I were going to recommend a book for a first time reader of CJ Cherryh, I'd probably either recommend Downbelow Station or The Pride of Chanur. Both are favorites of mine.

113fuzzi
Mar 21, 2012, 12:57pm Top

Last night I finished One More Night With the Frogs, and I really, really enjoyed it!

It is a series of short messages preached by the author, Hugh Pyle over a number of years.

They were "fun" to read, and entertaining, too. :)

114fuzzi
Mar 21, 2012, 12:59pm Top

Wow! I'm a third of the way done!



115ronincats
Mar 21, 2012, 1:57pm Top

Congratulations on hitting the 33% mark when we are less than 25% of the way through the year!

116fuzzi
Mar 21, 2012, 6:16pm Top

Thanks, ronincats!

When gardening season is in full swing, I probably will slow down...

117Meredy
Mar 22, 2012, 1:14am Top

25, good for you! Way to go! Does the frog sing, or does he play an instrument?

118fuzzi
Mar 22, 2012, 12:58pm Top

Ha!

The ticker just sits there and smiles.

The frogs in the book I just finished were the plague of frogs in Egypt, when Moses was telling Pharaoh "Let my people go!" :)

119fuzzi
Mar 22, 2012, 1:00pm Top

Finished The Virginian last night, and will write a review shortly, well, probably by Saturday. It was a very, very good book, and is going to be kept for a future reread. :)

Ticker updated to 26 books read...

120eclecticdodo
Mar 22, 2012, 3:50pm Top

wow you're really steaming ahead - well done!

121fuzzi
Mar 22, 2012, 8:00pm Top

Thanks!

Now, what do I read next? I was hoping that Letters of a Woman Homesteader would arrive, but it hasn't. I guess I'll go look at my bookshelves for a TBR choice...

122fuzzi
Mar 23, 2012, 7:58am Top

I wanted a "comfort" read last night (didn't want too much brain stimulation before bed!) so I picked up a book I'd previously read, but not in a while, Jeremy Poldark.

Ahhhh...fun!

123maggie1944
Mar 23, 2012, 8:20am Top

I am interested in folks who re-read books. I can hardly stand to do that. I always say to myself, "but I already know what is going to happen". I now know, in my more mature brain, that it can be about re-experiencing the language and the craft. Nice to see you are having fun with yours.

124eclecticdodo
Mar 23, 2012, 12:15pm Top

I very rarely re-read either. But for me it's because there are always SO many interesting looking books I haven't read yet that I don't want to spend precious time on one I've read before. Having said that, I comfort read children's fantasy when I'm feeling low - Chronicles of Narnia, The Borrowers, Harry Potter, that sort of thing.

125fuzzi
Mar 23, 2012, 12:24pm Top

I like to reread a book probably for the same reason I enjoy seeing a good movie for a second time.

Also, not only do I enjoy going back to the setting and characters, I often have only limited recollections of the plot details, so while it's not an entirely 'new' read, there are things I read that make me go "Ah! That's right! He did that..."

:)

126eclecticdodo
Mar 23, 2012, 12:34pm Top

Agreed, even my comfort books which I've read a number of times I forget details of the plot so there's still a sense of anticipation and wonder.

127fuzzi
Mar 23, 2012, 12:45pm Top

That's it, Jo! I am the same way.

I hope Letters of a Woman Homesteader comes today so I can read it this weekend. I've heard so much good about it here.

128ronincats
Mar 23, 2012, 2:13pm Top

I'm definitely a re-reader as well. I love to go back and re-experience favorite stories.

129fuzzi
Mar 23, 2012, 7:42pm Top

Yeah! Letters of a Woman Homesteader arrived, and it's the edition with the Wyeth illustrations! Woo!

130maggie1944
Mar 24, 2012, 8:47am Top

Sounds lovely! I hope you enjoy reading it.

131fuzzi
Mar 24, 2012, 3:13pm Top

I'll let you know! :)

132fuzzi
Mar 26, 2012, 4:17pm Top

I love it! I love it!

And I'm not done yet...

133fuzzi
Mar 29, 2012, 1:07pm Top

Found a couple of Beverly Cleary books in the second hand store, bought them and decided to read one last night. I don't recall that I'd read it before: Ramona the Pest.

Ms. Cleary has kids figured out, and she writes so well about their thoughts, fears and confusion regarding the adult world.

Wonderful book, will be reread.

134fuzzi
Mar 29, 2012, 1:08pm Top

Updated ticker:




27 to date...

135maggie1944
Mar 29, 2012, 2:43pm Top

Yup. Cleary books are very popular in the school libraries!

136fuzzi
Mar 29, 2012, 6:55pm Top

And in my library!

137scaifea
Mar 30, 2012, 7:44am Top

I'm working through a read of all of Cleary's works, and I love the Ramona/Henry Huggins ones very much. The Ralph S. Mouse series will always be my favorite, though.

138fuzzi
Mar 30, 2012, 5:12pm Top

scaifea, I've got The Mouse and the Motorcycle on my shelf, a recently acquired book. I read it a number of years ago, but it's overdue for a reread. I'm not sure if I read Ralph S. Mouse though.

Have you read Dear Mr. Henshaw?

139scaifea
Apr 2, 2012, 7:31am Top

Nope, not yet - I'm working through her bibliography chronologically, and I'm not up to that one yet. Is it a favorite?

140The_Hibernator
Apr 2, 2012, 7:35am Top

I haven't read a Beverly Cleary book in soooo long! I have Dear Mr. Henshaw sitting around in a bookcase somewhere, though.

141fuzzi
Apr 2, 2012, 7:25pm Top

(139) I've not read Dear Mr. Henshaw, but it's an award winner I believer.

(140) What are you waiting for????? :)

142fuzzi
Edited: Apr 6, 2012, 6:00pm Top

I started reading Penrod, but while it was amusing, I just couldn't "get into" it.

It's gone back to the library, and I'm currently reading Visible Light by CJ Cherryh. It's a collection of short stories, some very short, some a bit longer. It's good, and I'm almost finished with it.

143fuzzi
Edited: Apr 6, 2012, 6:00pm Top

Finished Visible Light and thoroughly enjoyed it! If you like CJ Cherryh, you should love this book of short stories.

Currently rereading Wild Trek, but as it's been a looooooong time since I read it last, it's like a brand new read!


144fuzzi
Apr 7, 2012, 6:03pm Top

Wild Trek is done...up to 29 now. :)

What next....

145fuzzi
Apr 18, 2012, 8:53pm Top

I've had a drought of reading time since Easter weekend.

I've been working on Mere Christianity, a reread, to discuss with a friend. Since I'm taking notes, I'm not rushing it but reading it slowly.

I wanted something light last night, so I picked up Little Arliss, a sequel to both Old Yeller and Savage Sam. It's not a long book, but if you've read the first two books, you should enjoy this one. It takes place about 6 or so years after Savage Sam, and Arliss is growing up in body, if not in maturity (he still likes to use rocks for defense!).

Enjoyed it, and would recommend it, but I'd suggest you read the first two books first.

146fuzzi
Apr 19, 2012, 12:47pm Top

Read Ramona the Brave last night. As I mentioned on the current reads thread, I love how Beverly Cleary captures the thoughts and actions of childhood so well. As Ramona uses her new closet as an elevator, I recalled doing similar things as a child...closets were great, and an old blanket thrown over the picnic table made a great clubhouse.

Thirty-one books as of last night. :)

147fuzzi
Apr 19, 2012, 9:38pm Top

Today I received my December Early Reviewer book, Kindred Souls. It just went to the top of my TBR pile!

148fuzzi
Edited: Apr 22, 2012, 3:14pm Top

Saturday: read Ribsy and Dear Mr. Henshaw, both of which were first time reads for me.

Ribsy is much like the other books in the Henry Huggins/Ramona series: the kids are kids, the dogs are dogs, and hilarity often results!

Dear Mr. Henshaw was a little more sobering, about a young boy whose parents divorce, and he winds up keeping a diary at the suggestion by his favorite author, Mr. Henshaw.

This afternoon I read Kindred Souls, which was sweet and charming, funny and touching. As it wasn't a long book, I have started Strider, which is the sequel to Dear Mr. Henshaw.

Thirty-four to date...


149fuzzi
Edited: Apr 23, 2012, 7:18pm Top

Strider's completed. Now what shall I read next...???

150fuzzi
Apr 24, 2012, 7:56am Top

Review of Kindred Souls:

The author of "Kindred Souls" is Patricia MacLachlan, the writer of "Sarah Plain and Tall", which I loved. I was looking forward to something similar. It was, and it wasn't.

"Kindred Souls" is a little book about the relationship between a 10 year old boy and his grandfather, Billy. Billy's extended family lives with him out on the prairie on a farm, close to where Billy was born: in a sod house.

Billy wants his sod house again, and what happens will delight you and make you smile.

It's not a sappy book, but definitely a book that should leave a smile on your face as you turn the last page and close up.

151fuzzi
Edited: Apr 24, 2012, 8:01am Top

I decided to read a recently acquired book, The Sarah, Plain and Tall Treasury, which consists of the first book, Sarah, Plain and Tall, and two sequels.

Here is my review:

I've read the first book in this omnibus, Sarah, Plain and Tall before, but not the two follow up stories. Last night, I read the entire series.

The first book, Sarah, Plain and Tall is told by Anna, the daughter of a widower, Jacob, and takes place about the turn of the century in the mid western plains of the USA. Jacob is lonely and has not sung since his wife died after giving birth to their second child, Caleb.

As the book opens Anna and Caleb are excited when their father tells them he has advertised for a wife, and has gotten a response from a woman in Maine, named Sarah. They take turns writing letters to Sarah, and she answers, telling them she will come and visit for a month.

Told from the perspective of the adolescent Anna, this story is plain, like Sarah, but touching and sweet.

The second book, Skylark, continues the story of the family, but in the midst of a severe drought that causes many of the settlers to pack up and leave, never to return. How this affects Jacob and his family is again told simply, but with love.

The third book, Caleb's Story, is told from the perspective of Caleb, after his sister Anna goes to town to work for her prospective father in law, a doctor. A stranger shows up at the farm, and brings questions about Jacob's mysterious past.

152fuzzi
Edited: Apr 24, 2012, 8:05am Top

Since The Sarah, Plain and Tall Treasury consists of three books, I counted it as three books read...




Woo! I'm halfway there!!!

153maggie1944
Apr 24, 2012, 9:04am Top

Congrats on a great milestone achieved! Whoo hoo! Horray! Horrah! Woop woop woop!!!!

And it is not even half way through our days in this year.

154streamsong
Apr 24, 2012, 10:39am Top

Wow--half way! You are zipping right along even with all your gardening (love your gardening journal!).

155fuzzi
Apr 24, 2012, 12:33pm Top

Thanks for the encouragement, ladies. :)

156thornton37814
Apr 25, 2012, 7:29pm Top

I just finished Kindred Souls as well. I was a little disappointed in the book because I was expecting something a bit closer to Sarah, Plain and Tall. I think my biggest problem with the story is the lack of line illustrations for the intended audience. That age needs something. They have no clue what a sod house looks like, unless they've read the Little House books and seen Garth Williams' illustrations.

157fuzzi
Apr 26, 2012, 1:16pm Top

(156) Well, illustrations might have added something, you're right.

The copy of the Sarah, Plain and Tall books I have (an omnibus) has no illustrations, bummer. :(

158fuzzi
Edited: Apr 26, 2012, 1:24pm Top

Oops, almost forgot, finished Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther Commentary Tuesday night. That makes 39!

And I picked up "1 - 2 Corinthians Commentary (The Bible Believer's Commentary Series)" by Peter S. Ruckman. I anticipate that I will enjoy it as much as the other commentaries of his that I have read...they're not boring at all!

159thornton37814
Apr 26, 2012, 1:57pm Top

It's been so long since I read Sarah, Plain and Tall that I don't remember its lack of illustrations. I do seem to recall that it was made into a movie, and I don't remember if I saw the movie or read the book first. If I saw the movie first, I may not have noticed the lack of illustrations as much.

160fuzzi
Edited: Apr 26, 2012, 6:29pm Top

I read another pioneer type book earlier this year: Letters of a Woman Homesteader. It only had about six illustrations, but they were done by NC Wyeth! :)

161fuzzi
Edited: Apr 27, 2012, 12:12pm Top

Read and finished A Dog Named Wolf last night.

If you enjoy wilderness/wildlife/trappers stories, you should enjoy this one. It's about a dog who is half wolf, but is more like his husky mother in his need for a master to look up to and to follow. "Wolf" faces many challenges and life-threatening situations in the Canadian wilderness.

"A Dog Named Wolf" is similar to books by Jim Kjelgaard, Jack London, Jack O'Brien and James Oliver Curwood, and definitely worth a read. There are fights and deaths within the story, but as the writing is not gratuitous in this area, it still should be okay for preteens and up.

Three stars.


162fuzzi
Apr 29, 2012, 6:21pm Top

Read and reviewed Cinderella Smith: the More the Merrier and then went on and read Tea With the Black Dragon (was supposed to be my May group read, but I couldn't help myself!).

42 to date, onward!

163fuzzi
Apr 30, 2012, 12:59pm Top

From maggie1944's thread:

A Book Survey I Found on the Internet

Hardback or trade paperback or mass market paperback?

Whatever I can find in decent shape and good price

Amazon or brick and mortar?

I'd shop in brick and mortar if we had anything decent around here...and Barnes and Noble is not my idea of decent.

I don't 'do' amazon much, but prefer abebooks and thriftbooks...


Barnes & Noble or Borders?

Neither

Bookmark or dogear?

Bookmarks of all sorts, including receipts and sticky notes

Alphabetize by author or alphabetize by title or random?

I have my books according to genre, then by author and then by title.

Keep, throw away, or sell?

Generally keep, but I have bought/acquired so many books this past year (thanks LT!), that I have started giving them away.

Keep dust jacket or toss it?

Keep

Read with dust jacket or remove it?

Depends on the book and the condition of the dust jacket. I have a large omnibus of the Dragonriders of Pern, and the dust jacket is sitting on the shelf...it tends to slip off as I read the book.

Short story or novel?

Mainly novels, but I have developed a taste for short stories, too.

Collection (short stories by same author) or anthology (short stories by different authors)?

Both, but I prefer the former.

Harry Potter or Lemony Snicket?

Huh?

Stop reading when tired or at chapter breaks?

Depends on book, but if I'm very tired I try to make it to the end of the chapter. It doesn't always happen, though.

"It was a dark and stormy night" or "Once upon a time"?

Huh?

Buy or Borrow?

Both, but I generally buy books that I'm pretty sure I'll like and keep, and even then I try to get them used. I borrow a bit from the public library as well, although their selection isn't as good as it's been in the past...budget cuts I suppose, or they're spending too much money on the public computers for the FaceBook crowd...

New or used?

Mostly used, but sometimes I'll splurge on new!

Buying choice: book reviews, recommendation or browse?

All, but mostly recommendation.

Tidy ending or cliffhanger?

Either, unless I have to wait three years for part 2 of the cliffhanger!

Morning reading, afternoon reading or nighttime reading?

Weekdays it's evening/nighttime reading (before bed). On weekends I try to get some reading done in the morning or afternoon, too.

Stand-alone or series?

I don't mind a series, if it's good and not just written as a series to get more books sold...and generally we know...

Favorite series?

Pride of Chanur by CJ Cherryh

Favorite children's book?

The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

Favorite book of which "nobody" else has heard?

Probably either "Rex" by Joyce Stranger (no touchstone for that one!) or perhaps Silver Chief, Dog of the North by Jack O'Brien

Favorite books read last year?

The Paladin by CJ Cherryh, read in December.

Favorite books of all time?

The Jungle Books, The Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, Sorrow, Memory and Thorn by Tad Williams, the Mary Russell series by Laurie King, White Fang and The Call of the Wild by Jack London...hard to stop!

Least favorite book you finished last year?

I don't generally 'finish books I don't like.

What are you reading right now?

A commentary on Job, written by Peter S. Ruckman and the King James Bible

What are you reading next?

Not sure, I like to look over my TBR pile by the bed, and make a selection

164fuzzi
Apr 30, 2012, 1:00pm Top

Read and reviewed Indian Captive, up to 43.

165maggie1944
Apr 30, 2012, 5:04pm Top

Interesting answers, fuzzi. Your "huh"s coincided with some of mine I think. I never really did get the dicotomy between "twas a dark and stormy night" and "once upon a time". What are we comparing? Bad fiction vs. fairy tales? And are there no other options? hahahahah

166fuzzi
Apr 30, 2012, 7:53pm Top

There is so much more than those two choices, I wasn't sure what the person who wrote the questions was trying to get for an answer.

As I have written in my profile, I don't care what the topic is for the most part, I just like reading stories!!

167fuzzi
May 1, 2012, 8:01am Top

Read Escape From Reason last night, and I found it fascinating. However, it's a bit deep, so I'm going to read it again, and again, until I "get it" all.

Up to 44...

168fuzzi
May 5, 2012, 12:53pm Top

Yesterday I picked up a used copy of Calico Captive and read it in its entirety last night.

While it is in the same genre as The Light in the Forest or Indian Captive, it's definitely geared more for the youth/child market.

Still entertaining and worth a read.

169fuzzi
May 7, 2012, 7:02pm Top

I started He is There and He Is Not Silent over the weekend, but while reading it, I discovered that I really needed to read the first book, The God Who Is There.

There's a lot of advanced vocabulary (especially since I've never studied Philosophy) and I'm taking my time reading it, making notes in the margins and highlighting interesting points made by the author.

I'm also reading Akin to Anne, a collection of short stories by the Anne of Green Gables author, LM Montgomery. They're fun to read, and it's refreshing to be back 100 years ago in Prince Edward Island.

Nothing to add to my 'completed' list, but still ongoing here...

170streamsong
May 8, 2012, 8:30am Top

I've never heard of Akin to Anne but I enjoyed the Anne of Green Gables series.

I wonder if you've ever read Follow the River by James Alexander Thom It's based on Mary Ingles' capture and escape from the Shawnee in Virginia. A friend loaned it to me as her very favorite book ever. I didn't rate it quite that high, but really enjoyed it.

171fuzzi
Edited: May 8, 2012, 3:42pm Top

I never heard of Akin to Anne either, until I found it at a thrift shop.

I've not read Follow the River, but will add it to my wishlist.

Have you read the Conrad Richter books A Light in the Forest and A Country of Strangers? Both of these involved white children held captive by American Indians being returned to their original families. Both are very good.

Oh, finished Akin to Anne:


172countrylife
May 10, 2012, 9:42am Top

fuzzi, I just looked for Akin to Anne on Amazon, but could not find that title. I did download a freebie that was just called Short Stories. Thanks for mentioning L. M. Montgomery. Prince Edward Island is still one that I need to get read for the Canadian fiction challenge.

streamsong, my library has Follow the River in downloadable audio format, so that may be the impetus I need to finally get my iphone capabilities figured out.

173fuzzi
May 10, 2012, 12:46pm Top

abebooks.com has it, for $3.63 including shipping:

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&tn=akin+to+anne&x=0&...

:)

174fuzzi
May 12, 2012, 1:55pm Top

Reading an old favorite, Exile's Honor as well as still reading The God Who Is There, and working through the book of Job in the Bible.

Now it's time to take a well needed/deserved lie down time, with a book...

175fuzzi
May 13, 2012, 9:05pm Top

Exile's Honor is completed, but instead of reading the followup story, Exile's Valor, I decided to skip ahead a bit...and picked up Arrows of the Queen.

It's been a tough week, I'll get back to The God Who Is There probably tomorrow.

Add one to my total...make it 47 books read to date.

176fuzzi
Edited: May 21, 2012, 7:43pm Top

Finished Arrows of the Queen, and the second book, Arrow's Flight. I'm currently rereading the third book in the series, Arrow's Fall and then will head on to something, probably completely different. :)

49 books read, to here.

177fuzzi
May 22, 2012, 7:46am Top

Arrow's Fall is completed.

Now, what shall I start next? Hmm...

178countrylife
May 22, 2012, 10:13am Top

Fantasy isn't my genre of choice; I've read very little - not even The Lord of The Rings! (Though I loved the movies.) Read some of the reviews for Exile's Honor and it did sound interesting, with its vow and promises, "honor, duty, loyalty". If I end up needing to add a fantasy to my lineup, I think I'll choose this one.

179streamsong
May 22, 2012, 10:50am Top

Are you going to join Morphy in reading The Neverending Story? I've never read it but the first few pages on Amazon look good.

So many books, so little time ........

180fuzzi
May 22, 2012, 12:54pm Top

(178) I thoroughly enjoyed that book, and would love to hear what you thought of it, IF you ever decided to read it.

(179) I don't think so at this time, too much juggling of things in my life. It is a book I've not yet read.

181fuzzi
May 31, 2012, 1:18pm Top

Currently reading Exile's Valor and have borrowed Fahrenheit 451 and The Neverending Story from the library. Maybe I'll get to start them this weekend!

In my Bible reading, I'm working through Psalms. :)

182fuzzi
Edited: Jun 3, 2012, 5:02pm Top

I take it all back...that is, about my scorn for e-readers. I have been allowed to borrow an I-Pad from our department...and I am having a blast collecting free books online.

I think I am in love......

P.S. I have finished Exile's Valor. 51 to date.

183fuzzi
Jun 3, 2012, 7:17pm Top

Picked up a copy of Hatchet by Gary Paulsen at a yard sale on Saturday, read it through this afternoon. Imagine the My Side of the Mountain story but with a scared and clueless 13year old boy alone in the Canadian wilderness instead. His only possession after a plane crash is a hatchet...

184countrylife
Jun 4, 2012, 1:10pm Top

My son loved that book! Hatchet. I haven't read it yet.

185fuzzi
Jun 4, 2012, 1:19pm Top

It's not a long read, give it a try!

I see there's a sequel out there, too...oh well...

~~

Currently reading Heidi.

186maggie1944
Jun 4, 2012, 7:16pm Top

I love, love, love Hatchet. It is such a tribute to "you can do it" for kids. I love the idea that a kid could survive under such circumstances and I think it could be true. I know the author has had some remarkable experiences hisownself!

187thornton37814
Jun 5, 2012, 8:43am Top

I read Hatchet many years ago when I took a YA lit class in library school. It's a great survival story.

188fuzzi
Jun 5, 2012, 9:25pm Top

Finished Heidi, which makes 53 read to date.

189fuzzi
Jun 5, 2012, 9:28pm Top

I also read Angus and the Ducks, but I am not going to count it towards my total, as it's really just a picture book, with few words.

190eclecticdodo
Jun 9, 2012, 7:56am Top

>182 fuzzi: "I think I am in love......"

yes, I was very sceptical about readers until I won one in a competition. It's not the same as reading a paper book, but it's pretty close and there are so many free or cheap books out there.

191fuzzi
Jun 9, 2012, 8:28am Top

Also, I found a Bible search app for free, and have been using it with my Bible study...it is so much quicker and easier than dragging out my Strong's or Young's concordances!

192fuzzi
Jun 9, 2012, 8:29am Top

I still am reading Fahrenheit 451 but am losing interest...

And am up to Psalm 77. :)

193fuzzi
Jun 9, 2012, 8:51pm Top

I have put down Fahrenheit 451. :( I lost interest in the fireman or what was going to happen.

I am currently reading Crossing the Continent. And enjoying it very much!

194bymerechance
Jun 9, 2012, 10:13pm Top

I am so glad to hear you gave up on Fahrenheit 451. I also didn't care what happened; the concept was good, but the story was told terribly, I thought.

195fuzzi
Jun 9, 2012, 10:55pm Top

I didn't particularly care about the characters, either.

196maggie1944
Jun 10, 2012, 8:09am Top

I think the book is quite dated and the reason it is considered so important is because at its time it was pretty ground breaking. The whole idea of "burning books" and why a government might do that, and how people might respond to such actions, is the value of the book. I don't think any one thinks it is remarkable for its character development.

I think I judged its value by looking at its place in the history of science fiction as a genre and its place in the on going discussion of the individual in relation to government.

197eclecticdodo
Jun 10, 2012, 12:19pm Top

Sorry you didn't like Fahrenheit 451. I think Maggie has a good point - it's more the concept than the writing that has made it a classic. It really got me thinking and that's what I loved.

198maggie1944
Jun 10, 2012, 12:52pm Top

This thread might be interesting and relevant to this discussion: http://www.librarything.com/topic/138160

Or not, apologies for possible thread hyjacking....

199fuzzi
Jun 10, 2012, 2:02pm Top

Good hijack, thanks Karen.

200Meredy
Jun 12, 2012, 7:33pm Top

I agree with Maggie on Fahrenheit 451. It's sort of like paying a visit to a historic landmark. You're not judging it as real estate or thinking of living there. Rather, you're looking at it for what it tells you about the times, the events, and the sensibility of the people who took part and for the experience (excitement, awe, thrill, horror, or whatever it moves you to) of having set foot in the place steeped in those memories.

201fuzzi
Jun 16, 2012, 9:59pm Top

I returned Fahrenheit 451 and The Neverending Story to the library yesterday. I read part of the former, and none of the latter, after reading reviews here on LT: there are too many books to read without wasting time and energy on something I am really not interested in...

...but I have three new library books waiting in the wings!

202fuzzi
Jun 17, 2012, 11:17am Top

Finished Crossing the Continent last night, and reviewed it.

Next up: Ruffian: A Race Track Romance.

203fuzzi
Jun 17, 2012, 10:22pm Top

It's been a productive day, book-wise. As I've been nursing a sinus headache off and on most of the day, I've found time to read:

1. Ruffian: a Race Track Romance

2. No Promises in the Wind

Total read to date: 56.

204fuzzi
Jun 19, 2012, 12:32pm Top

Aw, bummer.

I recently purchased Mercedes Lackey's "Winds" trilogy, for a reread, since the local library retired their copies. I started the first one, last night...

...and just couldn't get up much interest in reading it.

So I think I'll put them to the side, for another time. I hope I'll be interested in them again.

Now, decisions, decisions...what do I read next?

205fuzzi
Edited: Jun 19, 2012, 1:06pm Top

Updated Read List (as of June 19, 2012)

1. Paladin by CJ Cherryh - done
2. Silas Marner (reread) by George Eliot - done
3. Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley - done
4. Queenie Peavy (reread) by Robert Burch - done
5. The Black Pearl by Scott O'Dell - done
6. Hammerfall by CJ Cherryh - done
7. Finity's End (reread) by CJ Cherryh - done
8. Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo - done
9. Snow Dog (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
10. Irish Red (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
11. A Christian Manifesto by Francis Schaeffer - done
12. The Story of Paddington by Michael Bond - done
13. Jonah's Whale by Eileen Spinelli - done
14. Alas, Babylon (reread) by Pat Frank - done
15. Beautiful Joe (reread) by Marshall Saunders - done
16. The Homecoming by Earl Hamner, Jr. - done
17. Golden Mare by William Corbin - done
18. Ramona and Her Mother (reread) by Beverly Cleary - done
19. The Renegade (reread) by Winston Graham - done
20. Demelza (reread) by Winston Graham - done
21. Is Our English Bible Inspired by Sam Gipp - done
22. Heavy Time by CJ Cherryh - done
23. Hellburner by CJ Cherryh - done
24. Coyote, the Wonder Wolf (reread) by Joseph Wharton Lippincott - done
25. One More Night With the Frogs by Hugh Pyle - done
26. The Virginian by Owen Wister - done
27. Jeremy Poldark (reread) by Winston Graham - done
28. Letters of a Woman Homesteader by Elinore Pruitt Stewart - done
29. Visible Light by CJ Cherryh - done
30. Wild Trek (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
31. Little Arliss by Sam Gibson
32. Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary - done
33. Ribsy by Beverly Cleary - done
34. Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary - done
35. Kindred Souls by Patricia MacLachlan - done
36. Strider by Beverly Cleary - done
37. Sarah, Plain and Tall (reread) by Patricia MacLachlan - done
38. Skylark by Patricia MacLachlan - done
39. Caleb's Story by Patricia MacLachlan - done
40. A Dog Named Wolf by Erik Musterhjelm - done
41. Cinderella Smith: the More the Merrier by Stephanie Barden - done
42. Tea With the Black Dragon (reread) by R. A. MacAvoy
43. Indian Captive by Lois Lenski - done
44. Escape From Reason by Francis Schaeffer - done
45. Calico Captive by Elizabeth George Speare - done
46. Akin to Anne by LM Montgomery - done
47. Exile's Honor (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
48. Arrows of the Queen (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
49. Arrows Flight (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
50. Arrows Fall (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
51. Exile's Valor (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
52. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen - done
53. Heidi (reread) by Johanna Spyri - done
54. Crossing the Continent by Michel Tremblay - done
55. Ruffian: A Race Track Romance by William Nack - done
56. No Promises in the Wind by Irene Hunt - done
57. ?

(sorry no touchstones, but adding them would have been a lot of work for this list!)

206fuzzi
Jun 20, 2012, 12:25pm Top

#57: Christmas Horse by Glenn Balch.

Ben and his family live on a ranch in Idaho, where they breed and raise horses and cattle. It's the only life he has known, but now that he's 14 he has to go to school in Boise, several hours' drive from home.

When he goes home in December, his Christmas present is a 'green broke' horse he had his eye on, to train as his own cow horse. But in a week he has to go back to Boise? How can he train his horse, "Inky", while at school?

Ben does some growing up in this book as he works hard to balance school and the challenge of finding time and money to take care of his horse.

This book is suitable for either adults or juveniles. I read it when I was about 12, but it was just as good as a reread, some 40 years later. :)

207streamsong
Edited: Jun 23, 2012, 11:08am Top

I read quite a few Glenn Balch's books back in the 60's. (Hmm--I think I bought them through the Scholastic book flyers given out by the teachers and so probably have some somewhere in a box.) I always thought they were a lot more realistic portrayal of ranches and horses than many of the other "horsie" authors.

208fuzzi
Jun 23, 2012, 2:12pm Top

(207) If you do have any of those books, and don't want them, I would give them a good home.....

209fuzzi
Jun 23, 2012, 2:29pm Top

#58 The Empty Schoolhouse by Natalie Savage Carlson

Emma is 14, and lives in Louisiana with her parents and her younger siblings. One Sunday the priest announces that the Catholic school will soon be open to all children including he 'coloreds'. Emma's little sister Lullah is excited, but some folks are not, and soon strife comes to the town that was always peaceful before...

I enjoyed the characters in this book, but the 'bad' people who oppose integrating the school are rather two dimensional and cartoonish. I think it could have been better.

210fuzzi
Jun 23, 2012, 9:22pm Top

#59 The Cherokee Trail by Louis L'Amour

Back in the saddle again with a good L'Amour reread. The locale is Colorado, about 1863. Mary Breydon is a newly widowed survivor of the battles that destroyed her family's plantation, a mother, and in desperate need of a job. After cleaning up the Cherokee Trail stagecoach station she has a home for her daughter as well as income for their future. But a face from the past is determined to make sure she never will be able to identify him as her husband.'s killer...

This story is probably in the top ten L'Amours that I have read...and I've read over 100 of his books...Nuff said.

211maggie1944
Jun 23, 2012, 9:38pm Top

I think one of the things which recommends his books is that they just reek of authentic western experience. You just know he spent a lot of time living in the West. And probably on a horse, and with a cowboy hat...

212fuzzi
Jun 23, 2012, 10:16pm Top

And as a young man he was able to talk with men who had actually been there, in the late 1800's western areas.

213fuzzi
Jun 24, 2012, 3:00pm Top

I started reading The Last Lecture, a book that a friend of my son's suggested I read. I'll let you know what I think of it when I'm done, but so far I'm enjoying the author's thoughts.

214fuzzi
Jun 24, 2012, 3:02pm Top

Oops, time to bring the froggie forward...I've been neglecting him:


215fuzzi
Jun 29, 2012, 7:32pm Top

Finished and reviewed The Last Lecture, and read a new book, The Blind Outlaw, for a grand total of 61 books read to date.

216streamsong
Jun 30, 2012, 10:58am Top

Hey Lor;

You're doing great with your reading!

I have The Last Lecture sitting on Mt TBR--I picked it up after watching him on television program--perhaps Sixty Minutes? Very inspirational guy. It's nice to know you enjoyed his book.

217fuzzi
Edited: Jun 30, 2012, 11:46am Top

Thank you.

I highly recommend you read The Last Lecture, Janet. It's well worth the time. :)

218fuzzi
Jul 1, 2012, 1:29am Top

Read Cesar's Way today, and found a lot of common sense advice, but also some dog training suggestions that should have occurred to me, especially with my background in reading every bit of information on animals that I could find!

I don't have cable TV, so I appreciated this look into "The Dog Whisperer" and his methods. 4 stars (the rating system keeps disappearing on me!)

219fuzzi
Jul 1, 2012, 9:35pm Top

Trying to read The Fight by Norman Mailer, but his writing style is irritating to me...

220fuzzi
Jul 4, 2012, 2:10pm Top

Read an old favorite, White Ruff this afternoon. It's sort of an updated version of Lassie Come Home, but original as well. White Ruff is taken from his home in the hills of Idaho, and while his master, a teenager named Chet, has been told that his dog has died, Ruff continues to try to find his way home.

It's entertaining and believable. I'm going to give it 4 stars.

I've now read 63 books to date.

221fuzzi
Jul 6, 2012, 7:42am Top

Blitz was my read for last night. This is a story originally published in 1961 for the Weekly Reader Book Club. It is a story similar in nature to Black Beauty, but less preachy, and with less content. Blitz is about 4 years old when he is sold and becomes a fire horse. An accident injures Blitz and his owner, and the horse is sold to help pay bills. Unfortunately, his new master is cruel. Will Blitz ever find a kind master again?

I read it in one 'sitting', and enjoyed it very much, with no reservations of recommending it. It is worth reading if you are an adult, young or otherwise, but especially if you like 'horse' stories.

222fuzzi
Jul 7, 2012, 5:22pm Top

Received Just Add Water: Making the City of Chicago yesterday, and finished it today.

What I did not realize when I requested this as an ER selection was that it is a text book geared toward third graders!

However, I found it interesting and was pleased that the author, an elementary school teacher, did not 'dumb down' the material to a point that an adult would not/could not enjoy reading it.

And I even learned some things about Chicago! Good job.

223fuzzi
Edited: Jul 7, 2012, 5:41pm Top

Updated

50. Arrows Fall (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
51. Exile's Valor (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
52. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen - done
53. Heidi (reread) by Johanna Spyri - done
54. Crossing the Continent by Michel Tremblay - done (MG book)
55. Ruffian: A Race Track Romance by William Nack - done
56. No Promises in the Wind by Irene Hunt - done
57. Christmas Horse (reread) by Glenn Balch - done
58. The Empty Schoolhouse by Natalie Savage Carson - done
59. The Cherokee Trail (reread) by Louis L'Amour - done
60. The Last Lecture byRandy Pausch - done
61. The Blind Outlaw by Glen Rounds - done
62. Cesar's Way by Cesar Millan - done
63. White Ruff (reread) by Glenn Balch - done
64. Blitz (reread) by Hetty Burlingame Beatty - done
65. Just Add Water: Making the City of Chicago by Renee Kreczmer (ER book)

...and the read goes on...

224fuzzi
Jul 7, 2012, 9:18pm Top

Another one bites the dust:

Down the Long Hills (reread) by Louis L'Amour

225fuzzi
Edited: Jul 11, 2012, 12:46pm Top

Follow the River by James Alexander Thom

This is an extremely engrossing story, based upon the written experiences of 18th century pioneers in what is now West Virginia. Mary Ingles and most of her family are taken captive during a Shawnee raid. What she endures, and how she manages to survive is fascinating, especially when you realize that this is not Hollywood, but the 'real deal'.

The author has done a superb job of fleshing out the characters and information to relate the story of Mary Ingles' 6 week walk through the wilderness in an attempt to reunite with her husband and brother.

I had a hard time putting down this book, even to sleep! I gave it 5 out of 5 stars.

EDIT: 67 books read to date

226sirfurboy
Jul 11, 2012, 4:52am Top

That one sounds very interesting. I was confused by the similar name of Mary Ingalls Wilder of Little House on the Prairie fame, but a google search shows this is a different Mary Ingles, and one with her own Wikipedia entry! I wiill look out for that.

227fuzzi
Jul 11, 2012, 7:34am Top

Much of the information for Follow the River was taken from a book written by Mary Ingles' great-great-(great?) grandson, Trans Allegheny Pioneers. I found a pdf copy of it online and have been reading it.

228streamsong
Jul 11, 2012, 8:51am Top

Glad you enjoyed Follow the River! The friend that loaned a copy to me said it was her very favorite book ever.

Mary Ingles was an incredibly tough woman and a really inspirational story.

I'll have to look up Trans Allegheny Pioneers. You got me with a book bullet this time, fuzzi.

229fuzzi
Jul 11, 2012, 12:45pm Top

:D

It's available in pdf, online. Okay, there are typos/errors in it, but it's still readable.

230countrylife
Jul 11, 2012, 3:07pm Top

Follow the River sounds great. I just read another post about that one recently. Anyway, my library has a downloadable audio, so I'm going for it.

231fuzzi
Jul 11, 2012, 6:20pm Top

Woo! Great! I think you will really enjoy it, Cindy. :)

232fuzzi
Jul 11, 2012, 10:32pm Top

A new Chet and Bernie mystery is coming out in August!

The title is A Fistful of Collars, and I'm requesting it through our library tomorrow or Friday.

233fuzzi
Jul 14, 2012, 11:40pm Top

And yet another "COMING SOON:

Garment of Shadows, a new Holmes and Russell novel!

234fuzzi
Jul 20, 2012, 4:33pm Top

Lantern in Her Hand has been completed, a satisfying read. See my review by clicking the touchstone link.

That is 68 read to date.

235fuzzi
Jul 21, 2012, 2:37pm Top

Last night I reread a favorite from my childhood, Lochinvar Luck by the author of the "Lad" books, Albert Payson Terhune. Each chapter is another episode/adventure in the lives of Jamie MacKellar and his collie, Bobby.

While I recall reading this book as a child and loving it, as an adult I found plenty of character and plot development to also enjoy. It's always a good thing to find a story that transcends age and reading ability.

Four well-deserved stars, a blue rosette and a shiny silver cup for this 'Best of Show'.

236fuzzi
Jul 21, 2012, 3:51pm Top

Updated 7/21/12

60. The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch - done
61. The Blind Outlaw by Glen Rounds - done
62. Cesar's Way by Cesar Millan - done
63. White Ruff (reread) by Glenn Balch - done
64. Blitz (reread) by Hetty Burlingame Beatty - done
65. Just Add Water: Making the City of Chicago by Renee Kreczmer (ER book) - done
66. Down the Long Hills (reread) by by Louis L'Amour - done
67. Follow the River by James Alexander Thom - done
68. Lantern in Her Hand by Bess Streeter Aldrich - done
69. Lochinvar Luck by Albert Payson Terhune (reread) - done

Six to go...what will they be?

237countrylife
Jul 26, 2012, 1:43pm Top

I've had A Lantern in Her Hand on my wishlist for awhile now. Still sounds good!

238fuzzi
Jul 26, 2012, 8:38pm Top

It is quite good. I liked Follow the River more, but that is such a great book, comparison probably isn't fair!

Reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, and liking it very much...

239fuzzi
Jul 29, 2012, 9:43pm Top

Finished A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, and I have placed it not only on my 'wishlist', but on my favorites' list as well.

I really enjoyed this look into the lives within a poor community during the early 1900's. The author has captured the people and the time incredibly well...I got engrossed in the plot to the point that I was neglecting household chores.

Francie and her younger brother Neely live in the tenenents of Brooklyn. We follow them at home, on the streets and at school. While the book is about her extended family, the main character and protagonist is Francie. She dreams of becoming a writer someday.

The characters are convincingly real, believable, and I found that I really cared about this young girl and her family.

5 to go...

240fuzzi
Edited: Jul 30, 2012, 11:36pm Top

As part of the 'take it or leave it' challenge, I've chosen to try a new author, Sheri S. Tepper. I think I will read The Companions first, as the public library has several copies available.

241fuzzi
Jul 30, 2012, 11:38pm Top

Bummer, the book was listed as available, but the librarian and I could not find it. I grabbed a copy of Six Moon Dance instead.

242calm
Edited: Jul 31, 2012, 7:35am Top

I really like Tepper - sorry you didn't get The Companions but Six Moon Dance is one of my favourites. Hope you enjoy it:)

Edit to add - if I have time I might re-read it. Matched reads for TIOLI are good:)

243maggie1944
Jul 31, 2012, 8:24am Top

Here I am lurking my way through, on my new computer. Color me happy!

244streamsong
Jul 31, 2012, 10:17am Top

TIOLI is a lot of fun! I'm glad you're joining in!

Congrats on the computer, Karen! Here's hoping my new one will be up and running by the weekend. I'm really glad to have DD's backup laptop, but the letters are worn off most of the keys on the keyboard!

245fuzzi
Jul 31, 2012, 9:53pm Top

(243) wadidjuget? Huh? Huh?

246fuzzi
Jul 31, 2012, 9:55pm Top

(244) Janet, I wore off the letters on my 'lifetime' keyboard in less than a year...

247fuzzi
Jul 31, 2012, 9:58pm Top

I've not yet opened up Six Moon Dance, as I was too tired last night and it was too late to start a 'thinking' book, so I picked up The Way of a Dog, which I have NOT read before. I'm about halfway through that, and will start reading Tepper's book after.

248maggie1944
Aug 2, 2012, 5:12pm Top

I bought a Macbook Air, am taking classes at the Apple store to learn how to use it most effectively, and completely. It has been a slow start.... I am way behind in reading LT threads, and in reading my books, too. Plus my relatively newer iPhone (last edition, sadly) is also giving me some challenges. Luckily the Apple store can also talk to me about that... Sigh.

Rumor has it a new one is on the verge of being released... maybe I want the latest and greatest. I am such a retail whore...shiny shiny shiny things..... (-;

249fuzzi
Edited: Aug 2, 2012, 7:06pm Top

Not a retail whore, think of yourself as a crow, or magpie...or even a raccoon! You just like to collect shiny trinkets... ;)

250fuzzi
Edited: Aug 3, 2012, 12:13pm Top

Finished The Way of a Dog last night. It's a group of short stories about the dogs that Albert Payson Terhune knew (he was the owner of many collies and author of the Lad, a Dog stories).

In this collection, there are a number of stories about his dog, "Grey Dawn", who was a real character, and then an assortment of stories about other dogs, including one very sad one which made me cry.

Very good, and not really a children's book. Suitable for all ages, and I'm giving it 4 stars.

Next up: Six Moon Dance...

Oh, and here's my updated froggie!


251maggie1944
Aug 4, 2012, 8:17am Top

fuzzi, I do like the idea of imagining myself a magpie... goes with maggie doesn't it?

252fuzzi
Aug 4, 2012, 2:10pm Top

Hey, I didn't think of that, too cool!

253thornton37814
Aug 6, 2012, 3:11pm Top

Catching up on your thread. I read A Lantern in Her Hand years ago and liked it very much. It's just one of those timeless "prairie" books.

254fuzzi
Aug 6, 2012, 7:30pm Top

You should reread it, thornton! I'm keeping my copy, to reread later. :)

FYI: still working on Six Moon Dance. It's interesting, but it's not something I just can't put down. Maybe it will grip me more further along.

255fuzzi
Edited: Aug 6, 2012, 9:47pm Top

256fuzzi
Aug 12, 2012, 2:17pm Top

I'm just not getting into Six Moon Dance, but there is a lot of personal family 'stuff' going on right now. I'm not in the best mood to tackle something new, even if I do find it interesting.

However, The Companions finally became available through the library, so I'll give that one a chance before I put them both back on the shelf.

257fuzzi
Aug 13, 2012, 12:31pm Top

Last night I did not start The Companions, but started reading "Bruce" (stupid touchstone isn't working) by Albert Payson Terhune, a recent 'free' Kindle download.

I needed a comfort read, as I've been stressed out over my son wrecking his car Friday evening. He's okay, but the car is probably not fixable. Sigh.

258fuzzi
Aug 13, 2012, 10:03pm Top

I finished reading "Bruce" this evening.

As with all the Sunnybank collie books I've read, I enjoyed this story about one of the sons of "Lad". Bruce lacks all the nobler traits of the collie breed, and especially of his sire. He doesn't seem to have two brain cells to rub together!

But one day, through the actions of a cruel man, Bruce changes, grows up, and becomes a son worthy of his father. And this intelligence awakened would be put to use in the trenches of France, in the war to end all wars.

259fuzzi
Aug 15, 2012, 1:51pm Top

Started A Texan's Honor: The Heart of a Hero Book #2 last night. It was a free ebook, and I did not expect a classic, but so far it is entertaining.

260fuzzi
Edited: Aug 16, 2012, 1:03am Top

Finished A Texan's Honor: The Heart of a Hero Book #2, and here's my review:

Okay, this isn't a great book.

But it turned out to not only be entertaining, but a pretty good read.

At first I thought I was being dragged into some corny and contrived 'Western' romance, but the further into the book I read, the more I realized that my first impression was incorrect.

And I began to like the characters and their situations.

Now that I've finished this book, number two in a series, I've decided to find and read book one.




One more book to meet my challenge!

261fuzzi
Edited: Aug 16, 2012, 1:05am Top

Updated 8/16/12

60. The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch - done
61. The Blind Outlaw by Glen Rounds - done
62. Cesar's Way by Cesar Millan - done
63. White Ruff (reread) by Glenn Balch - done
64. Blitz (reread) by Hetty Burlingame Beatty - done
65. Just Add Water: Making the City of Chicago by Renee Kreczmer (ER book) - done
66. Down the Long Hills (reread) by by Louis L'Amour - done
67. Follow the River by James Alexander Thom - done
68. Lantern in Her Hand by Bess Streeter Aldrich - done
69. Lochinvar Luck by Albert Payson Terhune (reread) - done
70. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith - done
71. The Way of a Dog by Albert Payson Terhune - done
72. Meet at the Ark at Eight by Ulrich Hub - done
73. Bruce by Albert Payson Terhune - done
74. A Texan's Honor: The Heart of a Hero Book #2 by Shelley Gray - done

One more...

262fuzzi
Aug 16, 2012, 1:11am Top

My stack from the public library...waiting to be read:

The Big Sky
Joy in the Morning
The Companions
Cordelia Underwood, or the Marvelous Beginnings of the Moosepath League
The Shape of Water

Plus the dozens of TBR on my bookshelves...decisions, decisions...

263Meredy
Aug 16, 2012, 1:24am Top

Congratulations, fuzzi, you're going to make it!

264eclecticdodo
Aug 16, 2012, 6:23am Top

Wow! Only one more to 75. Well done!

265fuzzi
Edited: Aug 16, 2012, 11:51am Top

Updated Read List (as of August 16, 2012)

1. Paladin by CJ Cherryh - done
2. Silas Marner (reread) by George Eliot - done
3. Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley - done
4. Queenie Peavy (reread) by Robert Burch - done
5. The Black Pearl by Scott O'Dell - done
6. Hammerfall by CJ Cherryh - done
7. Finity's End (reread) by CJ Cherryh - done
8. Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo - done
9. Snow Dog (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
10. Irish Red (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
11. A Christian Manifesto by Francis Schaeffer - done
12. The Story of Paddington by Michael Bond - done
13. Jonah's Whale by Eileen Spinelli (ER book) - done
14. Alas, Babylon (reread) by Pat Frank - done
15. Beautiful Joe (reread) by Marshall Saunders - done
16. The Homecoming by Earl Hamner, Jr. - done
17. Golden Mare by William Corbin - done
18. Ramona and Her Mother (reread) by Beverly Cleary - done
19. The Renegade (reread) by Winston Graham - done
20. Demelza (reread) by Winston Graham - done
21. Is Our English Bible Inspired by Sam Gipp - done
22. Heavy Time by CJ Cherryh - done
23. Hellburner by CJ Cherryh - done
24. Coyote, the Wonder Wolf (reread) by Joseph Wharton Lippincott - done
25. One More Night With the Frogs by Hugh Pyle - done
26. The Virginian by Owen Wister - done
27. Jeremy Poldark (reread) by Winston Graham - done
28. Letters of a Woman Homesteader by Elinore Pruitt Stewart - done
29. Visible Light by CJ Cherryh - done
30. Wild Trek (reread) by Jim Kjelgaard - done
31. Little Arliss by Sam Gibson
32. Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary - done
33. Ribsy by Beverly Cleary - done
34. Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary - done
35. Kindred Souls by Patricia MacLachlan (ER book) - done
36. Strider by Beverly Cleary - done
37. Sarah, Plain and Tall (reread) by Patricia MacLachlan - done
38. Skylark by Patricia MacLachlan - done
39. Caleb's Story by Patricia MacLachlan - done
40. A Dog Named Wolf by Erik Musterhjelm - done
41. Cinderella Smith: the More the Merrier by Stephanie Barden (ER book) - done
42. Tea With the Black Dragon (reread) by R. A. MacAvoy
43. Indian Captive by Lois Lenski - done
44. Escape From Reason by Francis Schaeffer - done
45. Calico Captive by Elizabeth George Speare - done
46. Akin to Anne by LM Montgomery - done
47. Exile's Honor (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
48. Arrows of the Queen (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
49. Arrows Flight (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
50. Arrows Fall (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
51. Exile's Valor (reread) by Mercedes Lackey - done
52. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen - done
53. Heidi (reread) by Johanna Spyri - done
54. Crossing the Continent by Michel Tremblay (MG book) - done
55. Ruffian: A Race Track Romance by William Nack - done
56. No Promises in the Wind by Irene Hunt (reread) - done
57. Christmas Horse (reread) by Glenn Balch - done
58. The Empty Schoolhouse by Natalie Savage Carson - done
59. The Cherokee Trail (reread) by Louis L'Amour - done
60. The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch - done
61. The Blind Outlaw by Glen Rounds - done
62. Cesar's Way by Cesar Millan - done
63. White Ruff (reread) by Glenn Balch - done
64. Blitz (reread) by Hetty Burlingame Beatty - done
65. Just Add Water: Making the City of Chicago by Renee Kreczmer (ER book) - done
66. Down the Long Hills (reread) by Louis L'Amour - done
67. Follow the River by James Alexander Thom - done
68. Lantern in Her Hand by Bess Streeter Aldrich - done
69. Lochinvar Luck by Albert Payson Terhune (reread) - done
70. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith - done
71. The Way of a Dog by Albert Payson Terhune - done
72. Meet at the Ark at Eight by Ulrich Hub (ER book) - done
73. Bruce by Albert Payson Terhune - done
74. A Texan's Honor: The Heart of a Hero Book #2 by Shelley Gray - done
75. Dragonsong by Anne McCaffrey, a treasured reread!

266maggie1944
Aug 16, 2012, 10:17am Top

congratulations! good job!

267fuzzi
Edited: Aug 16, 2012, 11:48am Top

Thanks! I just finished Dragonsong.




Of the 75, 30 were rereads.

268maggie1944
Aug 16, 2012, 1:42pm Top

Woo hoo! May I be the first to offer my congratulations for hitting the magic 75 number. Good work, girl!

269jolerie
Aug 16, 2012, 1:54pm Top

Congrats on reaching 75 and with plenty of time to spare! :)

270countrylife
Aug 16, 2012, 2:18pm Top

I'm way behind on threads and just read about your son's car. Did it turn out to be fixable? Eight years ago, back in the days of better jobs, we'd bought our high school senior son a good used car that we expected to take him through college. Nope. He rolled it over and over down a deep ditch off a gravel road. After I saw that car, I just thanked God that he was alive. Even unhurt! But the hood was so smashed in it could only have been Providence. I hope your son is ok.

271fuzzi
Aug 16, 2012, 6:08pm Top

(270) We don't know if it's fixable, but the good news is that he was able to drive it up the slope and into the side yard, so technically it 'ran'. We are going to have it checked out, but not until he can put money into it. While most of what needs repair appears to be easily fixable (2 mirrors, bumper), there might be damage underneath that isn't readily apparent.

I was thanking and praising God that our son wasn't seriously hurt: he suffered a sore neck, and he's got a bruise behind one ear...from a blow that could have killed him.

A car can be replaced, a son cannot!

Thank you for your concern and caring.

272fuzzi
Edited: Aug 16, 2012, 6:16pm Top

And now, the larch...no, wait, scratch that! I mean

to be continued...

Group: 75 Books Challenge for 2012

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