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It's March 2017 Already- What Non-Fiction Are You Reading?

Non-Fiction Readers

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1JulieLill
Mar 1, 12:37pm Top

It's March 2017 Already- What Non-Fiction Are You Reading?

2Seajack
Mar 1, 5:40pm Top

Still reading John Steinbeck's A Russian Journal.

4paradoxosalpha
Mar 2, 9:42am Top

I just started The Fabric of Reality. Tags: epistemology, physics, metaphysics, biology, philosophy of science, math, virtual reality

5ThomasWatson
Mar 2, 2:49pm Top

The Hidden Reality by Brian Greene.

6paradoxosalpha
Mar 2, 2:53pm Top

>5 ThomasWatson:

Hey, Thomas. Are we both reading similar books, or are you just recommending that one to me as a more recent treatment of some of the topics and ideas in the Deutsch book? I was led to The Fabric of Reality, by the way, by an appended citation in the science fiction novel Brasyl.

8LynnB
Mar 5, 3:53pm Top

I'm reading Vimy by Pierre Berton for a book club.

JulieLill: I wish that book had more about the librarians!

9ThomasWatson
Mar 6, 11:26am Top

>I'm not familiar with the book by Deutsch, so I can't compare it to the one by Greene. If you're interesting the concept of a multiverse, The Hidden Reality, which I just finished over the weekend, is one I would recommend checking out.

I haven't read Brasyl but the sci fi group here talks about it often enough that I've put it on my list.

10JulieLill
Mar 6, 12:24pm Top

>8 LynnB: I'm about half way through the book and boy did it take a turn from saving books. I am enjoying it but I didn't realize I was getting a primer on Middle East terrorism.

11Seajack
Mar 6, 11:41pm Top

Coming back to say that, unfortunately, I found Steinbeck's book on Russia "dated"; would be of interest more to folks specifically into Russian history, or with a strong interest in 40s Europe.

13LyzzyBee
Mar 11, 8:02am Top

I'm reading Innocent at home which is a 60s book about travelling in America, and The Air b'n'b story which is a NetGalley advanced review copy and pretty well done so far.

14Bookmarque
Mar 11, 12:01pm Top

I'm almost 1/2 way through Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness by Peter Godfrey-Smith. This is right up my alley, but I'm disappointed by some bad writing, imprecise language and the overly simplistic approach. It isn't all bad, but I wanted something deeper and more scientifically rigorous.

15SylviaC
Mar 11, 1:28pm Top

>14 Bookmarque: Looks like something that would have interested me. To bad it didn't live up to its potential.

16lsg
Mar 11, 1:30pm Top

I just finished A Wilderness of error about the Jeffrey MacDonald case. I had read a lot about it when the Joe McGinnis book first came out but this one appears to be far more balanced looking it.

17JulieLill
Edited: Mar 11, 5:27pm Top

18Bookmarque
Mar 11, 5:37pm Top

It's not a total waste, Sylvia, but it's more simplistic than I anticipated. Could be all on my end.

19cindydavid4
Edited: Mar 11, 11:12pm Top

>7 JulieLill: Haven't read the book yet but have read several articles about the brave librarians. Amazing story

Just finished INSOMNIAC CITY
New York, Oliver, and Me Its not just a love story to Oliver Sachs, but to NYC as well.

21SDaisy
Mar 16, 11:54pm Top

I'm between non-fiction books at the moment, but I'm planning on shortly starting on Isky: Ed Iskenderian and the History of Hot Rodding by Max Stone. I won it in the Early Reviewers, and it looks like a good book; Iskenderian is an interesting man.

I recently finished reading Spice: The History of a Temptation by Jack Turner, which was very interesting but a slow read that was hard to get through.

23SChant
Mar 18, 12:47pm Top

Just started The Hidden Reality by Brian Greene - an introduction to the various theories of the multiverse. I expect to have my mind blown!

24SDaisy
Mar 18, 11:11pm Top

I decided to take advantage of the lull between nonfiction books to read Ernest Hemingway: Man of Courage by Kurt Singer and Jane Sherrod. So far it's pretty interesting.

25snash
Mar 19, 11:46am Top

Finished The Inkblots, an LTER book. In telling the story of Herman Rorschach and his test, the book also gives a glimpse into the other persons involved in originating psychological theory and the field of psychotherapy as it's been practiced and viewed from then to the present. It's an engaging and interesting story.

26JulieLill
Edited: Mar 19, 6:40pm Top

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Maya Angelou
5/5 stars
This is the first autobiography of Maya Angelou in which she tells the story of her life from birth to young adulthood and the birth of her son Guy in the early 40's. I was blown away with her writing and her recollection of a severe and difficult life growing up in America as an African American child and young woman. She is an amazing writer and I am looking forward to reading more of her books.

27JulieLill
Edited: Mar 19, 6:42pm Top

>25 snash: That books sounds interesting! Adding to my reading list.

28SDaisy
Mar 19, 11:11pm Top

>25 snash:
That is one book that I really would like to read! I've entered for it every time it popped up in the Early Reviewers, but never won it. I'm glad you enjoyed it. It looks so interesting. :-)

29LyzzyBee
Mar 20, 9:13am Top

I'm reading The Modern Writer and his World, a book on English literature published in the 1950s which gives a fascinating insight into attitudes of that time.

30SDaisy
Mar 20, 7:14pm Top

>29 LyzzyBee:
That book sounds fascinating indeed, I'll have to look into some time. :-)

I finished Ernest Hemingway: Man of Courage by Kurt Singer and Jane Sherrod. It was a very good and informative look into the famous author's life, and I enjoyed it.

31JulieLill
Mar 20, 10:31pm Top

Will Not Attend: Lively Stories of Detachment and Isolation by Adam Resnick
4/5 stars
Comedy writer Adam Resnick, who has written for David Letterman and Saturday Night Live, now writes about his life in a series of essays that are fabulously funny and yet disturbing. I could not help but laugh through these stories and some hit very close to home. Recommended to those not afraid of dark humor.

Started Max Perkins: Editor of a Genius by A. Scott Berg.

32LyzzyBee
Mar 21, 5:30am Top

>30 SDaisy: I'm not sure how hugely available it is, I picked it up in a second hand book place. If you get it, get the 3rd edition, which has info on the Angry Young Men and their like.

33snash
Mar 21, 7:42am Top

I reread Generations in 2017 to see if the future is panning out as predicted. Many predictions seem right on although I don't see Millennials as civic minded but rather narcissistic. Maybe they just haven't been galvanized by purpose yet.

34SDaisy
Mar 21, 12:28pm Top

>32 LyzzyBee:
Thanks! :-)

35nrmay
Mar 22, 3:53pm Top

I read and liked The Legendary Miss Lena Horne by Carole Boston Weatherford, a beautifully illustrated juvenile biography.

36paradoxosalpha
Mar 23, 11:36am Top

I just wrapped up The Serpent Symbol in the Ancient Near East and posted my review. I'm glad to have this one in my library.

37SDaisy
Mar 23, 3:08pm Top

Started on Isky: Ed Iskenderian and the History of Hot Rodding by Max Stone last night. So far it's super good!

38LynnB
Mar 23, 4:43pm Top

I'm reading Chronicles Abroad: Berlin, which are "tales of the city" (some fiction, some nonfiction) by several famous people. It's edited by John Miller and Tim Smith.

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