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swynn's Perry Rhodan thread

75 Books Challenge for 2018

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1swynn
Edited: Dec 27, 2017, 5:08pm Top

If you're looking for my main thread, it's here.

If you're looking for the thread where I ramble about a cheesy German science fiction soap opera then you've come to the right place. Welcome to the madness!

For those who have never encountered it: Perry Rhodan is the hero of a German science-fiction serial that is marketed as the world's largest science fiction series. I don't know whether that claim is true -- no doubt it depends on one's metric. Measured by words in print, I'm pretty sure that PR has few competitors. The main series has been continuously published since September 1961 in weekly novella-length adventures. Its 2,941st episode was published just this week. Besides the main series there have been over 400 standalone paperback novels, not to mention spinoffs, reboots, miniseries, video games, comic books, and one comically awful movie. And of course, translations. In the 1970s, Ace published English translations, running through most of the first 150 issues. The last Ace paperback was published in 1979, and the series' popularity has never been revived in English despite several attempts.

I first encountered the series as an exchange student to West Germany in 1986. I fell in love with everything about the series: the complicated backstory, the cheesy plots, the terrific covers, even the cheap newsprint. At that time I had access only to the latest issues and random back issues as I discovered them at flea markets so plots were frequently opaque, which actually added to the series's appeal. A couple of years ago I discovered that digitized back issues could be bought in packages online: last year I started from issue number 1, and all of that love came back.

So my own motivations are personal. It's about nostalgia, maintaining language skills, and feeding my inner middle-schooler. I wouldn't recommend the series to anyone else, except in small doses for curiosity's sake. I expect that the audience for my comments is small. But visitors are always welcome! My goal this year is to read 75 of these things, so if it appeals to you then drop by frequently!

2harrygbutler
Dec 27, 2017, 6:14pm Top

Hi, Steve! I'll drop a star. I've seen those Perry Rhodan translations from time to time but have passed them up (though I may have read one years ago). I'll be interested in hearing more about the series, in part so I can decide whether to add them to my library next time I run into them.

3lyzard
Dec 27, 2017, 6:25pm Top

If you're looking for the thread where I ramble about a cheesy German science fiction soap opera...

Well, naturally!

4drneutron
Dec 27, 2017, 9:40pm Top

Oh, cool. Will be watching as you go!

5aqeeliz
Dec 29, 2017, 7:22am Top

I always like to start all series from the begining, so this kind of long running series are my nemesis, good thing I don't know any German. :)

Starring to see what all this hype about Perry Rhodan is though, and why no one ever told me about it!

6drneutron
Dec 29, 2017, 8:34am Top

By the way, i’ve Got your main thread in The a Threadbook, but thought it would be good to capture this one on the wiki too. I can either link it in the Threadbook next to your main thread or I can put it in as a “group” read in the group wiki, or both. Or something different. 😀

Any preference?

7swynn
Dec 29, 2017, 7:58pm Top

>6 drneutron: I have no strong preference. If you have one, I'll rely on your sense of where users are likely to go looking for it since yours is likely better than mine. All other things being equal, I'll opt for a link next to my main thread. Thanks, Jim!

8richardderus
Dec 29, 2017, 8:58pm Top

I can't believe someone else knows about this series! I lived with a German-speaking lad for a goodly portion of the 1980s so got into it.

9swynn
Dec 29, 2017, 9:17pm Top

>8 richardderus: Hooray! Another fan! I hope this feeds your nostalgia as well, Richard!

10drneutron
Dec 29, 2017, 9:52pm Top

>7 swynn: Done! In the Threadbook next to your main thread.

11The_Hibernator
Dec 31, 2017, 1:00pm Top



Happy New Year! I wish you to read many good books in 2018.

12rosylibrarian
Edited: Jan 1, 1:12pm Top

13MickyFine
Jan 2, 4:52pm Top

I like the random German language tidbits that come up as you read these, so I'll probably skim through this thread. :)

14swynn
Jan 2, 5:02pm Top

>11 The_Hibernator:
>12 rosylibrarian:

Happy New Year right back, Rachel and Marie!

15swynn
Jan 2, 5:04pm Top

>13 MickyFine:

Fair enough. I'll mark the language-related posts with the phrase "German nerdery", so they'll be easy to find.

16swynn
Edited: Jan 4, 12:51am Top

** A Perry Rhodan Primer **

This thread picks up in medias res with episode 35. Here are the basics of the "story so far".

The STARDUST Mission

Perry Rhodan is an American astronaut, commander of the first crewed mission to the moon: the ship is the STARDUST, the year is 1971. As the STARDUST nears its landing site it loses communication with Earth. After a rough landing, Rhodan sets out with the crew's electrical engineer Reginald Bull to find the interfering signal. The signal, it turns out, comes from a giant spheroid spaceship -- obviously of no Earth design.

The Arkonides

The spheroid ship is the AETRON, foundered craft of a crew of Arkonides: humanoid aliens and masters of a vast intergalactic empire. The Arkonides, however, are in decadent decline: all but two of the Arkonide crew are practically catatonic, in thrall to popular entertainment. The two exceptions are Thora, commander of the AETRON, and Crest, its scientific leader. The AETRON is on a research mission, looking for the rumored Planet of Eternal Life, which Crest hopes will revitalize the Arkonides. Because of the Arkonides' general decline, nobody on board can repair the ship and nobody on their home planet will respond to a distress call. Worse, Crest is sick and growing weaker with leukemia. Rhodan strikes a bargain with the Arkonides: he will offer whatever aid he can -- including a cure for Crest's leukemia -- in exchange for Arkonide technology.

The Third Power

Perry Rhodan returns to Earth, but not to the United States. The world is a cold-war powder keg, and Rhodan knows that the balance is too delicate for any single power to possess the advantages of Arkonide technology. Instead of turning everything over to his own government, Rhodan lands in the middle of the Gobi Desert and establishes his own government: The Third Power. Other Earth powers don't like this, but thanks to Arkonide tech Rhodan can withstand all their attacks, even averting nuclear war.

The Mutant Corps

Nuclear research and the development of atomic energy and weapons in the mid-twentieth-century had unexpected side effects: the development of psychic powers among some who were born or raised near zones of high radiation. As Rhodan builds his Third Power, he recruits psychically gifted people to help him fight off alien invasions, establish a base on Venus, and intervene in a hostile invasion of the nearby Vega System.

Perry Rhodan Achieves Immortality

In the Vega System, Rhodan's team picks up clues pointing to the Planet of Eternal Life. Following a long trail of clues and passing a series of tests, Rhodan discovers the planet Wanderer: home to a superintelligent being who represents the disembodied existence of an entire race. This being, known only as "he" or "it" -- and later in the series as IT -- gives Perry Rhodan (and Reginald Bull) a cell-cleansing treatment that preserves his youth for 62 years. This effectively grants Rhodan immortality, assuming that he returns every six decades for retreatment.

Gucky the Mouse-Beaver

Yes, really. Think: Rocket Racoon with a cheerful disposition. Gucky joined the team during the search for the Planet of Eternal Life, smuggling himself aboard Rhodan's ship out of boredom. Gucky is described as resembling a large mouse with a flat beaver-like tail. He is the most gifted member of the Mutant Corps, possessing mutliple psychic gifts, including telepathy, telekinesis and teleportation -- all at unusually strong levels. "Gucky" was changed to "Pucky" for the American translations, for reasons I can only guess. I'm not sure "Pucky" is better.

The Springers

The latest of Rhodan's antagonists are the Springers, also called the "Galactic Merchants." The Springers are Arkonide relations who have a monopoly on interstellar trade: any upstart competitors are nipped in the bud, and they don't approve of The Third Power's incipient trade with the Vega System. Besides a halt to the Vega trade the Springers want the secret to Immortality, obviously worth a fortune to someone willing to sell it. Rhodan is willing to give up neither. He has tried to keep the Springers away from Earth, and recently won a battle to accomplish that aim temporarily -- but the Springer community is much larger and better armed than the fledgling Third Power so Rhodan knows it is only a matter of time before they arrive in the solar system with unstoppable force.

Most recently, Rhodan learned that all Springer patriarchs had been summoned to Goszul's Planet to plan a new offensive against the Third Power. Rhodan managed to smuggle four Mutant Corps agents -- telepath John Marshall, teleporter Tako Kakuta, telekinetic Tama Yokida, and suggestor Kitai Ishibashi -- onto Goszul's Planet. The plan was to convince the patriarchs that Earth was more trouble than it was worth; but when that plan went stale the team detonated a bomb at the patriarchs' meeting. Their Plan B was a qualified success; however their escape plan was a failure: their craft was shot down, leaving them stranded on a planet with a strong Springer presence. And the Springers are angry.

17swynn
Edited: Jan 4, 12:52am Top



Perry Rhodan 35: Im Land der Götter (= In the Land of the Gods) / Kurt Mahr
Date: May 4, 1962
Tagline: Life on Goszul's Planet becomes dangerous for the "gods" -- for Perry Rhodan's mutants are at work ...

The story so far: The year 1971 was the point in time, when Perry Rhodan -- originally an officer of the US-Space Force -- reached the moon in the rocket STARDUST and, using technology taken from the stranded Arkonide spaceship, founded his Third Power. Disputes on Earth, invasions from space, space battles, fights on distant planets -- all those things this Third Power has successfully survived in the short span of its existence. Now it is the Springers -- those descendants of the Arkonides who for eight thousand years have held an uncontested trade monopoly in the galaxy because they have implacably beaten down any potential competitor -- who represent a deadly threat to all mankind. Perry Rhodan has so far done everything in his power to prevent the Springers from making an enslaved world out of Earth. Levtan the Traitor played an important part in Rhodan's game -- for only through him was it possible to smuggle a group of agents into the "Great Council" of the Springers. These men -- proven fighters of Rhodan's Mutant Corps -- now arrive IN THE LAND OF THE GODS, after having carried out their attack on the Council of the Springers ....

Perry Rhodan arrives at the Tatlira System, but must hover at its edges to avoid discovery by Springer patrols. He begins to worry about the team's failure to report progress. Thinking they might need assistance, he orders Gucky to teleport aboard a Springer patrol ship to go to their assistance.

Meanwhile back on Goszul's Planet the four mutants have to figure out how to lie low until help arrives. This is harder than it first seems: the Springers are able to locate radiation from the Arkonide technology in the team's gear. In order to avoid detection they must carefully cache any equipment that can be used to contact Rhodan. Hiding among the planet's hinterlands they learn that the Springers keep the natives under control by pretending to be gods -- and by appointing robot priests to enforce the official religion in any town or city of reasonable size. So many eyes for the Springers make it difficult to keep their movements secret, and they spend most of the adventure trying to avoid the Springers while also trying to gather information about their operation's success.

Eventually the four meet up with Gucky, who relays instructions to lie low on the planet and be ready for further action. As they scramble to find a safe hideout they also discover that the local religion has its discontents. The planet may even be ripe for revolt ....

Teaser for the next adventure: John Marshall, Tako Kakuta, Kitai Ishibashi and Tama Yokida are actually stranded on Goszul's Planet. But instead of behaving like regular castaways, they rattle the foundations of the Springer leadership with surprise attacks. THE PLAGUE OF FORGETTING is the tool of liberation for an enslaved world ....

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Planet of the Gods. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Matt Graham and Walt Liebscher, and chapter five of a serialization of Richard Vaughan's The Exile of the Skies. It was reissued by Orbit in 1977 with a cover by Bob Layzell.

18aqeeliz
Jan 4, 5:58am Top

Oooh! We want more!

19swynn
Jan 4, 12:53pm Top

>18 aqeeliz: You're in luck! More is coming, probably this weekend.

20harrygbutler
Jan 4, 12:58pm Top

>16 swynn: Thanks for the fill-in. Maybe "Gucky" sounded too much like "gunk" but "Pucky" was considered reminiscent of Puck.

>17 swynn: Cool!

>19 swynn: Looking forward to reading more!

21swynn
Edited: Jan 7, 1:03pm Top

>20 harrygbutler: Yes, my guess would be something along those lines. Since this is language-related, I'm marking it as nerdery.

** German Nerdery **

The natural English pronunciation of "Gucky" sounds a lot like "Yucky" or (as you point out) "Gunky", which I expect is something the translators didn't want to associate with a recurring hero. So what to call him?

The German pronunciation sounds more like "cookie," but I doubt "Gooky" would have worked since it's a misprint away from "Goofy." The idea of a mouse-beaver is goofy enough without calling attention to it.

Since Gucky was introduced as a practical joker the American translators probably thought "Pucky" more appropriate, Puck being a notable prankster. I don't like it though. To my ear "Pucky" sounds at least as bad 'since it is a Midwesterner's euphemism for excrement -- e.g. "bull-pucky."

In the original text it's explained that Perry Rhodan named Gucky for his large eyes -- an explanation that can't possibly make sense in translation, since it depends on knowing the German verb "gucken", i.e., "to look." (Apparently the writers forgot that Rhodan's preferred languages are English and Inter-Galactish, but nevermind.) If the American translators felt "Gucky" must change, why didn't they choose "Looky", which would solve both the "Yucky" problem and the problem of translating h'is name origin, and which would evoke "Lucky" rather than poop? You could even argue that the same evocation exists in the original, since "Gucky" is phonologically similar to the German word for "lucky" -- glücklich. "Looky" really seems like a better choice all around, but nobody asked me. :)

Personally, I solve the problem by pretending it doesn't exist. On this thread he's "Gucky" as Perry Rhodan intended.

22swynn
Edited: Jan 8, 7:47am Top



Perry Rhodan 36: Die Seuche des Vergessens (= The Plague of Forgetting) / Clark Darlton
Date: May 11, 1962
Tagline: They fear the great forgetting -- and grant a colonial world its freedom ...

The story so far: The year 1971 was the point in time, when Perry Rhodan -- originally an officer of the US-Space Force -- reached the moon in the rocket STARDUST and, using technology taken from the stranded Arkonide spaceship, founded his Third Power. Disputes on Earth, invasions from space, space battles, fights on distant planets -- all those things this Third Power has successfully survived in the short span of its existence. Now it is the Springers -- those descendants of the Arkonides who for eight thousand years have held an uncontested trade monopoly in the galaxy because they have implacably beaten down any potential competitor -- who represent a deadly threat to all mankind. Perry Rhodan has so far done everything in his power to prevent the Springers from making an enslaved world out of Earth. Levtan the Traitor played an important part in Rhodan's game -- for only through him was it possible to smuggle a group of agents into the "Great Council" of the Springers. These men -- proven fighters of Rhodan's Mutant Corps -- did their part. But now they will do more: they free an entire planet from foreign rule! THE PLAGUE OF FORGETTING serves as the tool of liberation ....

The Mutant Corps continues to undermine the Springers on Goszul's Planet. In the last couple of adventures, they bombed the Springers' council meeting, disrupting plans for an attack against Earth; they then escaped into countryside, hiding from the Springers, their robots, and their local accomplices. As this adventure opens, the mutants make contact with an underground resistance and plan a counterattack.

Violence is out of the question for several reasons; fortunately, Gucky has smuggled a weapon onto the planet that can resolve the situation nonviolently. It's a biological weapon, a case of bombs containing a bacteriological agent causing a disease whose symptoms include severe memory loss. By releasing this contagion the team hopes to disrupt the planning of hostilities agaist Earth, but they also hope to scare the Springers away from Goszul's Planet. If all goes as planned, the Springers will not only leave but will quarantine the planet, giving the native Goszuls time to bootstrap their own government (and incidentally establish trade and diplomatic ties with Earth).

A plan is one thing, but carrying it out is another. For starters, they have to retrieve the bombs, which Gucky had to cache shortly after arrival to escape detection. Then they have to convince the Goszul underground to cooperate in spreading the plague. Finally they have to place bombs on the Springer base for maximum effectiveness ...

Teaser for the next adventure: The Springers fear the "great forgetting" -- they fear it more even than death. So they hastily evacuate the planet and give the Goszuls their freedom, who until now had served as their slaves. But what if the Springers return early .... ? Perry Rhodan has an answer for this case as well. It is: A PLANET GOES CRAZY.

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Plague of Oblivion. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Mark Pines and Melvin Sturgis, and chapter six of a serialization of Richard Vaughan's The Exile of the Skies. It was reissued by Orbit in 1977 with a cover by Tony Roberts.

23swynn
Edited: Jan 18, 12:02pm Top



Perry Rhodan 37: Ein Planet spielt verrückt (= A Planet Goes Crazy) / Clark Darlton
Date: May 18, 1962
Tagline: Little Gucky has his finest hour -- and Sergeant Harnahan makes an unbelievable discovery ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded research cruiser of the Arkonides.
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials.
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders in the Vega-Sektor and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle."
1976 - Perry Rhodan reaches the planet Wanderer in the STARDUST II and together with Bully achieves relative immortality -- but he loses more than four years.
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus.
1981 - The Overhead attacks, and the Third Power survives its hardest trial thus far.
1982 - The "galactic merchants" discover the Earth ...
The year is now 1983, and the Third Power's conflict with the galactic merchants has shifted to Goszul's Planet, to a world that "goes crazy" in order to drive the merchants away for good ....


The last adventure ended with most of the Springers fleeing Goszul's Planet for fear of a memory-robbing plague. Besides a few stragglers, the Springers leave behind a secret shipyard where an experimental craft is being built whose technology exceeds even that of the Arkonides. The ship is nearly complete, and is guarded by a force of 99 battle robots. Not all of the Springers were so eager to abandon the new craft. In particular, Topthor, a commander of the "Superstrong" military clan, sees an opportunity. With his fellow Springers gone, Topthor plans to take the ship for his own purposes.

When Perry Rhodan's sensors detect that 13 Springer ships have arrived in the system, Rhodan quickly sets about securing the ship and the planet. He assigns Sergeant Harnahan into space with orders to serve as a lookout. Gucky, scouts the secret shipyard, then together with the mutant corps, captures one remaining Springer and then the robots for reprogramming. Once the robots are on Rhodan's side they plan a reception for Topthor. Their plan is to feign madness: convince the Springers that the plague is even worse than they imagine; that environment suits are no effective barrier against it and that it can even infect and be carried by robots.

Meanwhile, Sergeant Harnahan lands on a nearby moon. His intention is to set up a base from which he can observe traffic in the system. Instead, he discovers a curious new life form: a spherical being, millennia old, who wants two things: energy to continue its travels, and a meeting with Perry Rhodan.

Teaser for the next adventure: A PLANET GOES CRAZY to win freedom from its oppressors. Using an allegedly incurable plague as a deterrent against the galactic merchants was a complete success -- and Perry Rhodan can now prepare for the long-promised ADVANCE TO ARKON ...

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as A World Gone Mad. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Forrest Ackerman and Larry Herndon, and chapter seven of a serialization of Richard Vaughan's The Exile of the Skies. It was reissued by Orbit in 1977 with a cover by Bob Layzell.

24swynn
Edited: Jan 18, 11:59am Top



Perry Rhodan 38: Vorstoß nach Arkon (= Advance to Arkon) / Kurt Mahr
Date: May 25, 1962
Tagline: They expected a friendly welcome -- but they were treated like beggars ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded research cruiser of the Arkonides.
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials.
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders in the Vega-Sektor and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle."
1976 - Perry Rhodan reaches the planet Wanderer in the STARDUST II and together with Bully achieves relative immortality -- but he loses more than four years.
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus.
1981 - The Overhead attacks, and the Third Power survives its hardest trial thus far.
1982/83 - The "galactic merchants" want to turn the Erth into a colony world -- but Perry Rhodan turns the tables* and relieves the merchants of an important base.
On Earth the year is now 1984, and the GANYMED is being prepared for an ADVANCE TO ARKON.


Crest and Thora have been trying to return to their home planet Arkon ever since Perry Rhodan rescued them way back in Heft no. 1. Rhodan has been putting them off because the Arkonides rule an interstellar empire -- and when Rhodan meets them he wants to do so from a position of strength. The time has finally come: in the next-generation starship he looted from Goszul's Planet -- newly christened GANYMED -- Rhodan can finally approach Arkon on his own terms. Or so he thinks.

Things do not go as planned. As GANYMED approaches Arkon, they are met with hostility rather than welcome, even though Rhodan sends any and all identification codes Crest can supply. Eventually they are forced down on the planet Naat where they are to wait until Arkonide officials deign to see them. Rhodan gives the Arkonides a day and when they don't show up he puts together a team -- himself, Reginald Bull, and teleporter Tako Kakuta -- to infiltrate the offices of the local potentate. Rhodan intends either to force a meeting with Arkon, or to sabotage the tractor beam that keeps the GANYMED trapped on Naat.

Things do not go as planned. The adventure closes with Rhodan still trapped on Naat, still without meeting the Arkonides. But he is a little wiser: he has learned that there has been a regime change on Arkon since Crest's and Thora's departure. In the interim the Arkonide populace reached such a state of lethargic decadence that machines have taken over the government. The situation is grim, but Rhodan is not yet out of options ...

Teaser for the next adventure: The GANYMED lies trapped in the spaceport of Naat, chained by unconquerable energy fields. But Perry Rhodan has one more trump to play.... Will he and his team manage to leave Naat unobserved and seek out the Imperator of Arkon...?

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as To Arkon!. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by PGarcia, and chapter eight of a serialization of Richard Vaughan's The Exile of the Skies. It was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Peter Elson.

25swynn
Edited: Jan 17, 11:40pm Top

*German nerdery:

The phrase I translate above as "Perry Rhodan turns the tables" is actually:

Perry Rhodan dreht den Spieß um

Literally: "Perry Rhodan turns the spear around," a metaphor rather more pointed. And pointy.

(English nerdery: according to the OED the phrase "turn the tables" originates with rise of board games in the 17th century. To "turn the table," then, would switch the players' positions, exchanging an advantageous position for a disadvantageous one, and vice versa.)

26swynn
Jan 31, 5:17pm Top



Perry Rhodan 39: Die Welt der drei Planeten (= World of Three Planets) / K. H. Scheer
Date: June 1, 1962
Tagline: The ruler of Arkon -- merely a marionette of the giant positronic brain ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded research cruiser of the Arkonides. (Volume 1)
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials. (Volumes 2-9)
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders in the Vega-Sector and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle." (Volumes 10-18)
1976 - Perry Rhodan reaches the planet Wanderer in the STARDUST II and together with Bully achieves relative immortality -- but he loses more than four years. (Volume 19)
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks, and the Third Power survives its hardest trial thus far. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The "galactic merchants" want to turn the Erth into a colony world -- but Perry Rhodan turns the tables and relieves the merchants of an important base. (Volumes 28-37)
On Earth the year is now 1984. The GANYMED, the ship captured from the "galactic merchants," has long started its ADVANCE TO ARKON. And so Perry Rhodan has fulfilled the promise he made 13 years ago, to return the Arkonides Crest and Thora back home.
But their reception has left much to be desired, for THE WORLD OF THREE PLANETS has experienced a dramatic change in government ...


The last adventure closed with Perry Rhodan and the crew of the GANYMED trapped by tractor beam on Naat, an outlying planet of the Arkon system. On Naat they are supposed await disposition by the new Arkonide government -- but the new government is in no hurry and Perry Rhodan's skills do not include waiting. After an unsuccessful attempt to sabotage the beam, Perry Rhodan has one last option: the "fictive transmitter" he acquired on Planet Wanderer back in Episode 32. Rhodan crews up one of the GANYMED's disc-shaped ancillary craft, called a "Gazelle." Though the Gazelle cannot escape the tractor beam any better than its mother ship, it won't need to do so because Rhodan's plan is to beam it, not blast it, to Arkon.

Only: which Arkon? It turns out that Arkon is not a single planet, but rather three planets sharing the same orbit. Arkon I, the "Crystal World," is where most Arkonides live; Arkon II is a planet of business and industry; and Arkon III is home to the empire's military and the positronic brain that has taken over the government. Rhodan chooses Arkon I where he hopes to meet Imperator Orkast XXI, nominally the head of Arkon empire. Rhodan makes contact with Orkast conveniently fast, but to little avail. Orkast no longer has the slightest influence over government -- he spends his days making art, and "Imperator" is nothing but a title.

Having no luck with the Imperator, the team seeks out Admiral Kenos, an old associate of Crest and Thora, who is not as decadent as most of the planet. In fact, the Robot Brain has charged Kenos with finding recruits for the Empire's new super-battleships; Kenos is sympathetic to the Crest and Thora and recommends Rhodan's team for a battleship crew, pretending that the humans are actually Arkonide colonists from the planet Zeklon V.

Rhodan's team gets aboard the super-battleship -- a spheroid ship with diameter 1.5 kilometers -- and put it through its paces. Of course they consider the risks and benefits of trying just to steal the ship but decide to wait for a better opportunity, until they get a message from the GANYMED: the Naats are about to discover Rhodan's absence! Realizing they won't get another chance, Rhodan orders his crew to fire up the engines and fight off any robots who try to stop them. They pick up the GANYMED on their way out of the system.

Teaser for the next adventure: Yes, that was the great secret that Crest and Thora kept to themselves for 13 years: Arkon is a world of three planets, a world of technical wonders! And only the fictive transmitter from Planet Wanderer made it possible for Perry Rhodan to visit this wonder-planet! But to leave Arkon he had to resort to a cunning ruse! Perry Rhodan and his people have escaped the ruling positronic brain, but have they yet recovered their freedom ... ? ACTION AGAINST THE UNKNOWN is the impressive and exciting report of the further adventures of Earth's space travelers!

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Realm of the Tri-Planets. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Steven Utley and Matt Graham, and the final chapter of a nine-part serialization of Richard Vaughan's The Exile of the Skies. It was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Angus McKie.

27richardderus
Jan 31, 6:45pm Top

I keep having this vision...Gucky being Googley...as in "Barney Google, with the goo-goo-googley eyes..."

Gotterdammerung being the twilight of the gods, would one evoke the same thing by saying "guttesdammerung" of the death of one god? Specifically asking for use in an alternate history tale involving the death of Bismarck.

28swynn
Edited: Jan 31, 7:51pm Top

"Gottesdämmerung" would be the twilight of a single god.

I'd never heard the term before, but it has some precedent: here and here.

I ought, though, to disclaim: I'm no expert in the language. I know enough to understand and make myself understood, and read Perry Rhodan while only occasionally consulting a dictionary. (Comments and corrections from native speakers are not only welcome, they're eagerly appreciated.)

29richardderus
Jan 31, 7:52pm Top

Wunderbar!

30swynn
Edited: Feb 3, 3:46pm Top



Perry Rhodan 40: Aktion gegen Unbekannt (= Action Against the Unknown) / Clark Darlton
Date: June 8, 1962
Tagline: The "Titan" is the most powerful battleship in the universe -- and yet she must hide from her pursuers ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded research cruiser of the Arkonides. (Volume 1)
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials. (Volumes 2-9)
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders in the Vega-Sector and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle." (Volumes 10-18)
1976 - Perry Rhodan reaches the planet Wanderer in the STARDUST II and together with Bully achieves relative immortality -- but he loses more than four years. (Volume 19)
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks, and the Third Power survives its hardest trial thus far. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The "galactic merchants" want to turn the Erth into a colony world -- but Perry Rhodan turns the tables and relieves the merchants of an important base. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's advance to Arkon (Volumes 38-39)
Arkon offered surprises even for Crest and Thora, who had lost contact with their home for 13 years, -- not to mention Perry Rhodan and his spacefarers from Terra! And yet they deceived the great positronic brain that serves as regent for the Arkonide Empire. The TITAN, the most powerful spaceship in the known universe, is now in their possession. But to keep the TITAN they will have to start an ACTION AGAINST THE UNKNOWN, a battle against a sinister opponent ...


The last adventure ended with a daring escape in a stolen spaceship: Perry Rhodan and his crew fled the Arkon system in a "Universe"-class superbattleship, which they've now rechristened TITAN. They did not, however, leave unnoticed or unopposed. Fortunately, the frenzy of their escape left their five-dimensional wake almost impossible to trace, so they are safe for now. Probably safe. Temporarily safe. They have no illusions that the Arkonide robot brain will give up the search. Their escape jump landed them in the Voga system, some three light-years from Arkon. And for now they'll have to stay, because any additional hyperspace jumps would certainly be detected.

It's not long before they are contacted by representatives from Zalit, fourth planet in the Voga System. Zalit is home to an Arkonide colony, and Rhodan is initially concerned that the Zalites will betray them. But no: the Zalite leader Zarlt has even more worrisome plans. Zarlt dislikes the idea of being the subject of a machine, so he plots to overthrow the robot brain and take its place. In Rhodan he sees a potential ally, because he knows that Rhodan has stolen the TITAN and therefore knows how to penetrate Arkon's defenses.

But the Zalites are not the only intelligent species on Zalit. There are also a number of telepathic methane-breathing invertebrates called Mooffs. The Zalites explain that the Mooffs are pets, translators, and lie detectors. But the Mutant Corps learns the power relationship is in fact exactly the opposite. The Mooffs are not only telepaths but also mind controllers. It is in fact the Mooffs trying to overthrow the robot brain, using the Zalites as puppets. And even more mysteriously the sedition isn't the Mooffs' idea. (What would a bunch of methane-breathers want with an empire full of oxygen/nitrogen atmospheres anyway?) No, the Mooffs take their orders from an unknown third party, but even the Mutant Corps' best telepaths can't figure out who.

It's a touchy political situation, and Rhodan moves to play all sides. He plays along with Zarlt in order to unravel his plans, while the Mutant Corps contacts resistance fighters. If they play their cards right they can quash the revolution, eliminate the Mooff influence, and ferret out a clever and powerful enemy of the Arkonide Empire -- a service that just might allow Rhodan to negotiate a favorable relationship with a pissed-off robot brain ...

Teaser for the next adventure: The spacefarers of the Third Powers have outsmarted the giant positronic brain that serves as regent of Arkon, and they still celebrate their possession of TITAN -- but their ACTION AGAINST THE UNKNOWN has shown how important it is to have the positronic brain as a friend and not an enemy ... THE GIANT'S PARTNER shows how Perry Rhodan accomplishes that ...

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. (I love how dude on the left ducks for the logo.) Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Challenge of the Unknown. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by J. Harvey Haggard, and the first chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors. This episode's chapter was by Ralph Milne Farley. Challenge of the Unknown was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Peter Jones.

31richardderus
Feb 3, 3:51pm Top

There are also a number of telepathic methane-breathing invertebrates called Mooffs.

*happy sigh*

32swynn
Edited: Feb 8, 5:56pm Top

>31 richardderus: More Mooffs!:



Perry Rhodan 41: Der Partner des Giganten (= The Giant's Partner) / Clark Darlton
Date: June 15, 1962
Tagline: A world in thrall to the telepaths -- and only the Mutant Corps can break the mind control!

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded research cruiser of the Arkonides. (Volume 1)
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials. (Volumes 2-9)
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders in the Vega-Sector and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle." (Volumes 10-18)
1976 - Perry Rhodan reaches the planet Wanderer in the STARDUST II and together with Bully achieves relative immortality -- but he loses more than four years. (Volume 19)
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks, and the Third Power survives its hardest trial thus far. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The "galactic merchants" want to turn the Erth into a colony world -- but Perry Rhodan turns the tables and relieves the merchants of an important base. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's advance to Arkon (Volumes 38-39)
Arkon offered surprises even for Crest and Thora, who had lost contact with their home for 13 years, -- not to mention Perry Rhodan and his spacefarers from Terra! And yet they managed to outsmart the great positronic brain that has served for the last six years as regent for the Arkonide Empire, and to take possession of the TITAN, the most powerful spaceship in the known universe. But to be recognized as THE GIANT'S PARTNER Perry Rhodan must complete an important assignment ...


Perry Rhodan is hiding out on the Planet Zalit. The robot rulers of Arkon are searching for him because he has stolen a superbattleship. But Zalit is not a quiet hideout: Zarlt Demesor, ruler of Zalit, plots to invade Arkon and take the empire by himself. But an underground revolution is brewing, whose members hate Zarlt more than they hate their Arkonide robot masters. And unbeknownst to Zarlt his actions are not his own, for the telepathic Mooffs are controlling him for their own ends ... or for someone else's ...

Rhodan's long game is to ally himself with the Arkonide Empire, robot rulers or no. He establishes communication with the robot brain to explain his position. The robot is a reasonable strategist. It recognizes the limitations of robots, the uselessness of this generation of Arkonides, and the fact that Rhodan has uncovered a genuine plot against the empire. The robot brain listens to Rhodan's proofs of insurrection, and agrees that if Rhodan can resolve the matter favorably then he will be treated as an ally of the Empire and may keep the TITAN as reward.

That leaves only the showdown. Rhodan and Bull confront Zarlt and Gucky leads the rebels in an attack on the Zarlt's palace. But Rhodan miscalculates just how suspicious Zarlt is, how prepared he is that Rhodan might not cooperate, and just how powerful a coordinated psychic attack can be when half a dozen Mooffs team up to break a victim's mental shields. Will Gucky arrive in time? Pffft. You have to ask?

The adventure closes with the robot brain thanking Rhodan for his service and giving him his next assignment: find out who has been using the Mooffs, and stop them.

Teaser for the next adventure: Arkon's positronic regent has recognized Perry Rhodan as a partner -- albeit one on retainer -- and thereby legalized the TITAN's acquisition. But the dangerous mission that Perry Rhodan and his Mutant Corps have taken on for the regent, is far from over, even if the old order can be reestablished on Zalit. A spaceship-trap already waits for the TITAN ...

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Giant's Partner. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by Norbert J. Novotny, and the second chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors, with this episode's chapter by David H. Keller. The Giant's Partner was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Peter Jones.

33swynn
Edited: Mar 24, 10:21pm Top



Perry Rhodan 42: Raumschiff TITAN funkt SOS (= Spaceship TITAN Sends Out an S.O.S.) / Kurt Brand
Date: June 22, 1962
Tagline: Honur is the grave of spaceships -- whoever lands on the planet is lost!

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded research cruiser of the Arkonides. (Volume 1)
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials. (Volumes 2-9)
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders in the Vega-Sector and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle." (Volumes 10-18)
1976 - Perry Rhodan reaches the planet Wanderer in the STARDUST II and together with Bully achieves relative immortality -- but he loses more than four years. (Volume 19)
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's advance to Arkon (Volumes 38-39)
Under the rule of the great robot brain, the power of the decadent Arkonide Empire has grown again, so that no opponent dares any longer to attack it openly. But the Empire does have opponents, as the secret attack on Zalit has proven. But who are the unknowns who have used the Mooffs for their own purposes? And where can their central command be found ...?


The last adventure closed with a new partnership between Perry Rhodan and the robot brain that now rules Arkon. But Rhodan is not yet ready to share everything. In particular he wants to keep Earth's coordinates secret. But he must send to Earth for more supplies -- and for more crew to operate his recently-acquired (ahem) superbattleship TITAN. Fortunately, the GANYMED is equipped with a "structural compensator" which can prevent anyone from tracking its five-dimensional wake.

So Rhodan sends the GANYMED home under the command of Oberst Freyt, then looks for an out-of-the-way place to lie low while he awaits Freyt's return. A likely hideout is the planet Honur, an uninhabited desert planet in a system with no traffic. In fact, long years ago the Arkonides placed an interdiction on the system, a ban which is technically still in force. Rhodan lands the TITAN on Honur, then leaves Bully in charge while he and Crest make a reconnaissance flight around the planet.

It turns out that Honur is not in fact uninhabited: the descendants of an ancient Arkonide colony still survive, calling themselves "The Purified." The Purified have adorable pets called Nonus that resemble little bears. With Rhodan and Crest in absentia, Bully and everyone else in the TITAN crew accept The Purified's gifts of Nonus to take back to the ship. Back on board, the crew throws a party because they're feeling reeeally good and the Nonus are sooo adorable.

Meanwhile, back on the reconnaissance flight Rhodan and Crest fly over Honus's single mountain range where they discover a graveyard of spaceships. "Graveyard" here is no melodramatic expression for a junkyard: most of the ships discarded here contain the remains of their crew. By the time Rhodan and Crest realize that *someone* has a similar plan for the TITAN, and that the TITAN's crew has been compromised by psychedelic teddy bears, it is too late. And that's even before the alien robot army arrives.

By the adventure's end, Rhodan has saved the TITAN, thanks to assistance from Gucky who is immune to the Nonus influence, and from Julian Tifflor who also was absent from the TITAN when the Nonus were brought aboard; and from reinforcements delivered in the nick of time by Oberst Freyt. But any sighs of relief are premature: three captive Mooffs have escaped the TITAN, leading Rhodan to conclude that the Mooffs and the Nonus are pieces of a single plot which he is no closer to unraveling. Worse, the TITAN's crew have suffered terminal damage to the ganglia of their central nervous systems.

Teaser for the next adventure: Even a superbattleship is powerless when its crew no longer obeys its commander's orders! The situation left by the mass infection was hopeless for the TITAN and her commander -- and only the GANYMED's last-minute arrival rescued them from the attacking robot ships. But what will happen to the seven hundred sick people on board the TITAN? Is a cure possible, or does infection mean a death sentence ... ? Only the plague's creators can answer this question -- and to discover them, Perry Rhodan must return to the spaceship-trap!

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided three interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as SOS: Spaceship Titan!. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Norbert J. Novotny and Spencer Strong, and the third chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors. SOS: Spaceship Titan! was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Angus McKie.

34swynn
Edited: Mar 14, 2:00am Top



Perry Rhodan 43: Rauschgifthändler der Galaxis (= Drug Dealers of the Galaxy) / Kurt Mahr
Date: June 29, 1962
Tagline: Assault detachment operation "Landing Party" -- just three men escape the Nonus-plague!

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded Arkonide research cruiser (Volume 1).
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials (Volumes 2-9).
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle" (Volumes 10-18).
1976 - The STARDUST II discovers the planet Wanderer, and Perry Rhodan achieves relative immortality (Volume 19).
1980 - Perry Rhodan's delayed return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's first contact with Arkon and appointment as the ruling positronic brain's agent in the galactic cluster M-13 (Volumes 38-42)
When a force of 700 men no longer cares about following their commander's orders, even a giant battle machine like the TITAN falls into severe danger. But what is even worse: the crew who have fallen victim to the Nonus-Plague are already good as dead, for human medicine knows no antidote! Only one hope remains: to find the DRUG DEALERS OF THE GALAXY and make them talk!


Having narrowly escaped the planet Honur in the last adventure, Perry Rhodan now faces the prospect of returning. His original crew of 700 -- including Crest, Thora, Reginald Bull, and most of the Mutant Corps -- are now terminally ill with an illness whose primary symptom is debilitating euphoria. Fortunately he has reinforcements from Earth, including medical staff who identify the cause of the illness: an artificial chemical, argono-hexylamin, which attacks the central nervous system. But who has manufactured the poison? Who used the Nonus to spread it? The most likely source for answers is Honur, where Rhodan feels certain the unknown poisoners must maintain a secret base.

Adventure ensues. Though his original crew is incapacitated, Rhodan has 800 reinforcements recently arrived from Earth, some of which he sends to explore Honur -- duly warned about the Nonus and adequately protected with environment suits this time. Rhodan's agents make contact with the Purified, and also with some not-so-purified natives they just call Honos. The natives offer to show the Terrans the "tracks of the gods." This leads them to a secret cave and mountain fortress, where they encounter various dangers and eventually meet the Aras, manufacturers and traders of all varieties of pharmaceuticals.

Alas, none of the Aras survive the climactic battle -- which leaves Rhodan a little wiser about his adversaries, but no closer to finding a cure for his friends and crew.

Teaser for the next adventure: Perry Rhodan is desperate! The latest mission on Honur has brought to light the authors of the Nonus-plague -- but not the serum he so feverishly sought to cure the artificial sickness! Might Arkon's ruling positronic brain know the antidote ...? Perry Rhodan hopes so. He makes contact with the robot -- only to be given an assignment that he cannot refuse.

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Beware the Microbots, referring I assume to one of the dangers encountered on Nonus: swarms of mosquito-like robots that can deliver a dose of argon-hexylamin through an environment suit. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by George W. Proctor and Gerald W. Page, and the fourth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors. Beware the Microbots was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Angus McKie.

35swynn
Edited: Mar 19, 9:15pm Top



Perry Rhodan 44: Der Mensch und das Monster (= The Human and the Monster) / K.H. Scheer
Date: July 6, 1962
Tagline: The artificial beings attack -- and the riddle of the Mooffs is solved ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded Arkonide research cruiser (Volume 1).
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials (Volumes 2-9).
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle" (Volumes 10-18).
1978 - The STARDUST II discovers the planet Wanderer, and Perry Rhodan achieves relative immortality (Volume 19).
1980 - Perry Rhodan's delayed return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's first contact with Arkon and appointment as the ruling positronic brain's agent in the galactic cluster M-13 (Volumes 38-43)
If you want to be recognized as an agent of the Arkonide regent, you don't have much choice but to accept the Regent's orders and carry them out. Perry Rhodan knows this, and his rebot psychologist reinforces this knowledge. But the positronic brain's order is to fly to the planet of the Mooffs, to a meeting between HUMAN AND MONSTER ...


The last adventure closed with the discovery of the Aras as authors of the Nonus-Plague, and with the inconvenient deaths of all Ara agents on Honur. Where to track the Aras' consipiracy? The only clue is that Rhodan believes that the same group had strategically placed Mooffs on Zalit during the troubles there (episodes 40-41), so the next logical place to seek the Aras is on the Mooffs' home planet.

There are a few problems with seeking out the Mooffs' home planet. First, Rhodan doesn't know where it is so he must ask Arkon's robot regent. Second, Rhodan's team survived their last encounter with the Mooffs thanks only to the psychic talents of his Mutant Corps -- and all of his Mutant Corps save two: Gucky and Wuriu Sengu, who has the ability to see through walls which is cool but not much help against mind-control powers. Rhodan wants backup -- but he has to be careful in asking for it because the robot regent mustn't realize how much of Rhodan's force is affected. When Rhodan presents his situation to the robot brain he learns of a new problem: the regent has already sent an Arkonide fleet to the Mooff homeworld to destroy it.

Negotiations are successful, and Rhodan speeds to the methane-ammonia gas giant Mooff VI where he heads off the Arkonide attack. He receives telepathic warnings to stay away, which he ignores. Upon landing his crew battles Mooffs and a new foe: pulsing grey rubbery teleporters his crew call "Meistersingers" for the musical tones they make when teleporting. Battles are fierce, and at some times they seem to have last-minute assistance from some unknown force. Eventually Rhodan discovers a dome on the planet's surface, which can only be the Aras' base. He destroys the base, but this time manages to capture some Aras for interrogation. It turns out that the Aras on Mooff VI have no idea about the operations on Honur and no antidote for the Nonus-Plague. But they do hint at the next best place to look: the hospital planet and Ara power center Aralon.

Before leaving, Rhodan is contacted by a telepath who calls itself Trorth. Trorth explains that he has been trying to help Rhodan: first by warning him to stay away, then by assisting with battles as he could. It turns out that Trorth is a Mooff, and represents Mooffs who regret the business on Zalit and wish to make peace with the Arkonide Empire and with Rhodan in particular. Rhodan accepts their friendship, and instructs his crew to build pressure suits so that fifty Mooffs can join the TITAN crew.

Teaser for the next adventure: Even at meetings between humans who speak the same language, mistakes that lead to tragic conflicts can sometimes not be avoided. At the first meeting between human and monster, the likelihood of such tragic conflicts that arise out of mutual ignorance is naturally much greater! In any case the humans who landed on the Mooffs' Planet had a bitter lesson to learn. It is quite different in the next PERRY RHODAN-adventure! There it is the Terrans who have a lesson to teach the Aras!

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided three interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Man and Monster. The first edition was published by Ace in 1973, with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Paul Delinger and Donald F. Glut, and the fifth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors. Man and Monster was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Peter Jones.

36swynn
Edited: Apr 2, 12:18pm Top



Perry Rhodan 45: Seuchenherd Aralon (= Epidemic Center Aralon) / Clark Darlton
Date: July 13, 1962
Tagline: Battle fleets are ready for action - but the galactic physicians do not fight with conventional means ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded Arkonide research cruiser (Volume 1).
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials (Volumes 2-9).
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle" (Volumes 10-18).
1976 - The STARDUST II discovers the planet Wanderer, and Perry Rhodan achieves relative immortality (Volume 19).
1980 - Perry Rhodan's delayed return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's first contact with Arkon and appointment as the ruling positronic brain's agent in the galactic cluster M-13 (Volumes 38-42)

Heal and help! That is the defining idea of Perry Rhodan's actions. It is not his way to watch idly as 700 of his best people, despite deep sleep and artificial nourishment, undergo a slow but inexorable decay. For the victims of hyper-euphoria, help can only be found from the authors of the plague. And if they will not help freely, then they must be compelled! -- The TITAN's goal therefore is the EPIDEMIC CENTER ARALON ...


The next stop in Perry Rhodan's search for a cure to his crew's hyper-euphoria is Aralon, a center of activity for the Aras. The Aras have a reputation as physicians to the galaxy, but Rhodan has learned that the Aras have been creating their own business by creating and spreading designer plagues that only their antidotes can heal. Rhodan first stops at Arkon, where he presents his evidence to the robot brain. The brain approves action against Aralon and even gives Rhodan command of a robot fleet for backup. But it also warns Rhodan to proceed carefully because despite the Aras' sins the empire still needs their medical services.

Rhodan opts for an undercover operation. He sends Julian Tifflor to Aralon with Wuriu Sengu and the infected Thora and a cover story: Tiff and Thora are supposed to be lovers, and her condition has so worried Tiff that with Sengu's assistance and against orders he has abandoned Rhodan to seek safety and a cure on Aralon. With this story, the team can scout the Aralon base. Intrigue follows, as do peril, capture, escape, rescue, combat, and principled speechifying.

As Rhodan gains the upper hand, the Aras call for help to the "Superheavies," the Springer military clan that gave Rhodan so much trouble when he battled the Springers. The Superheavies rush to assist but after an initial fruitless assault, the Superheavies learn that Rhodan has a superior force. Instead of retailiating, Rhodan lays out the Aras' underhandedness. The Superheavy commander Taralon is impressed with Rhodan's fairness and disgusted with the Aras' business model. He offers Rhodan a cautious friendship.

As for the Aras, Rhodan spares them and their world as well but with a warning. They must stop spreading plagues, and cure those they have already started, or he will come back angry.

Teaser for the next adventure: Many observers followed Rhodan's operations with breathless suspense, for it was the first time in the Great Empire's recent history that someone rose up, took action in the events on Aralon, and taught the galactic physicians a lesson. Will the Aras take this lesson to heart and in the future work only for the galaxy's benefit? The answer appears in the BUSINESS WITH ARKONIDE STEEL ....

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Epidemic Center: Aralon. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Jim Harmon and R. Michael Rosen, and the sixth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors. Epidemic Center: Aralon was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Colin Hay.

37swynn
Edited: Apr 2, 1:25pm Top



Perry Rhodan 46: Geschäfte mit Arkon-Stahl (= Business with Arkon-Steel) / Clark Darlton
Date: July 20, 1962
Tagline: Rescue or destruction of Earth? The memory banks of an onboard computer become the deciding factor ...

Despite appearances this is no tale of Hitler vs. the Cybermen. What appears to be a toothbrush moustache is just a nasal shadow. And Cybermen wouldn't appear on Dr. Who for another four years. So, disappointment. But as a chapter in the Perry Rhodan saga it offers some interesting developments...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded Arkonide research cruiser (Volume 1).
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials (Volumes 2-9).
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle" (Volumes 10-18).
1976 - The STARDUST II discovers the planet Wanderer, and Perry Rhodan achieves relative immortality (Volume 19).
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's first contact with Arkon and appointment as the ruling positronic brain's agent in the galactic cluster M-13 (Volumes 38-42)

The Aralon mission is finished, in which Perry Rhodan acquired the antidote to the Nonus-plague. His operations for the Robot Brain of Arkon should have ended with that, especially since exposing treachery against the Empire and rounding up the traitors removed a dangerous threat. That's what Perry Rhodan thinks, anyway -- so he asks the Regent for a vaction! But Perry Rhodan's BUSINESS WITH ARKON-STEEL is anything but a vacation ...


Perry Rhodan may have beaten the evil physicians of Aralon, but they refuse to admit defeat. Despite Rhodan's warning they plot to destroy him and Earth. In this they find willing accomplices among the Springer patriarchs, the "Galactic Merchants" of episodes 28-37 who have their own grudge to settle.

Rhodan's new friend, the "super-heavy" Springer captain Talamon, warns him of the danger and offers assistance ... for a reasonable price. Rhodan offers information about a large store of spaceship-quality Arkonide steel, thinking of the spaceship graveyard on Honur (episode 42). Talamon indicates that this would be an acceptable trade and begins recruiting allies, among them Rhodan's old foe Topthor.

Meanwhile Rhodan carries out a complex covert operation. He pretends to take a vacation to Earth but actually hides the TITAN in the gravity well of a gas giant. From there he hatches a counterplot. How much do the Springers actually know about Earth? Topthor knows its coordinates (from episode 32, when Rhodan unwittingly led him to the Solar System), but who else? It turns out that Topthor has kept this information secret against the day he could make a profit off of it, and the current situation seems to have proved him right. But Topthor's business strategy just may be the weak link in the Springers' plans, if Rhodan can insert a team onto Topthor's ship and alter the data stored there.

The adventure closes with Reginald Bull and a team of mutants escaping from a Springer conference on Laros, a moon of the planet Gom. The team has successfully altered the data on Topthor's ship, though not without robot battles and interference from an unidentified psychic power. Though they flee, however, they cannot run away: instead their craft is drawn toward Gom.

Teaser for the next adventure: Because only a single ship's computer held data for Earth's galactic position, it was relatively easy for Perry Rhodan's agents to replace the real data with false ones. But what will happen to Reginald Bull and the eight mutants, who had to hastily flee after their successful mission? And what is the origin of the mysterious powers who turn Bull's craft into their game ball ...

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Project: Earthsave. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by John Hollis Mason, G. Gordon Dewey, and Max Dancey; and the seventh chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors. Project: Earthsave was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Colin Hay.

38swynn
Edited: Apr 5, 9:46am Top

German nerdery:

From episode 49 "The Earth Dies" (yes, I'm behind on reports):

"Zehn Minuten!" Bullys Augen wurden groß und rund. "Das bedeutet, dass die Springer in genau zehn Minuten ... heiliger Bimbam! Was tun wir denn noch hier?"

That is: "Ten minutes!" Bully's eyes grew large and round. "That means that the Springers in exactly ten minutes ... holy Bimbam! What are we still doing here?"

"Holy Bimbam" is my brand-new favorite expression.

Apparently it's not a Rhodanism, though: it's common enough to earn an entry in the LEO online dictionary, where suggested translations include "Holy mackerel!" and "Holy moly!", which illustrate that English-speakers have no room to ridicule. There is also a similar German expression "Heiliger Strohsack!" which literally means "Holy straw sack!" but really is it worse than mackerel?

39MickyFine
Apr 5, 12:29pm Top

Holy Bimbam should totally be a common phrase!

40swynn
Apr 5, 5:12pm Top

Holy Bimbam! It's a book!

There is something beautifully zen about taking a collection of foreign idioms, translating them literally into English, and presenting them without context or explanation.

41MickyFine
Apr 6, 10:48am Top

>40 swynn: That is utterly delightful.

42swynn
Edited: Apr 14, 6:27pm Top



Perry Rhodan 47: Gom antwortet nicht (= Gom Does Not Answer) / Clark Darlton
Date: July 27, 1962
Tagline: Gom is everywhere! A race with death in the twilight zone of the Hell planet ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded Arkonide research cruiser (Volume 1).
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials (Volumes 2-9).
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle" (Volumes 10-18).
1976 - The STARDUST II discovers the planet Wanderer, and Perry Rhodan achieves relative immortality (Volume 19).
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's first contact with Arkon and appointment as the ruling positronic brain's agent in the galactic cluster M-13 (Volumes 38-43)

After what happened on Laros, the Ara-base near planet Gom, it is time for Perry Rhodan to leave the domain of the Arkonide Empire and to prepare Earth's defenses against the impending attack by the Aras and Springers. But as they fled Laros, Rhodan's best people -- Bully and eight mutants -- were pulled away to planet Gom by some inexplicable power. Perry Rhodan waits for a sign of life, but GOM DOES NOT ANSWER ...


Bully's team land on Gom, a planet with gravity twice that of Earth's, in the middle of a furious storm. All hands survive, but their ship is damaged beyond repair. They flee the ship and crawl to a nearby cave to wait out the storm.

When the storm clears, the telepaths make weak mental contact with Gom's predominant life-form, which look like paint spots. The "paint-flounders" haven't much on their mind except feeding -- and their ship's compromised hull makes it a delicious snack. Fortunately, the team's environment suits offer some barrier to the paint-flounders' munching, but not a long-term one. (Later in the story, Bully decides that "paint-flounder" is too silly a name and insists they be called "Goms." Which is pretty boring for a character who spends most of his time as comic relief.)

The paint-flounders are also known to the Aras, who have used the beings as raw material for a bioengineering project, artificially-created monsters called Bios. When the Aras realize that Rhodan's team is stranded on Gom they send an small army of the Bios to finish them off. Good news is that the Bios arrive in ships, which offer an option for escaping the planet. Bad news is, well, the paint-flounders, the Bios, the environment, the loss of communication with Rhodan, and just about everything else ...

Teaser for the next adventure: The TITAN's scientists would like to make an extended study of the strange and dangerous Goms who very nearly made victims of Bully and the mutants. But Perry Rhodan remains firm. He knows it is high time to return to Earth, and to lay the groundwork for a scam of cosmic scope, which is the only thing that can still save Earth from impending destruction. The goal of this deception is to reinforce the attackers' notion that Earth is really the third planet in the Betelgeuse System!

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Silence of Gom. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Greg Akers and M.B. Graham; and the eighth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors. The Silence of Gom was reissued by Orbit in 1978 with a cover by Peter Jones. This was the last of the Orbit releases, two episodes shy of the current story arc.

43lyzard
Apr 10, 6:16pm Top

>38 swynn:

Not quite the same thing, but that put me in mind of the second Godzilla movie, from 1955, in which one of the characters says, "Bakayara", which means something like, "You dummy!" In the American dub of the film, they have him saying, "Ah, banana oil!" :D

44swynn
Edited: Apr 10, 9:51pm Top

>43 lyzard: I watched the first few Godzilla movies a couple of years ago, and I remember seeing that expression (more than once?) in the subtitles. I assumed it was a Japanese idiom translated literally into English. How interesting... and maybe unsurprising ... that it was a fake Japanese idiom.

45swynn
Edited: Apr 13, 10:39am Top

This message has been deleted by its author.

46harrygbutler
Apr 13, 9:53am Top

>44 swynn: I always understood "banana oil" to be American slang; I've certainly encountered it outside of Godzilla movies.

47lyzard
Apr 13, 10:17am Top

>46 harrygbutler:

Yes, but it isn't Japanese slang; and it's two Japanese characters talking when that particular masterpiece of translation occurs. :D

48swynn
Edited: Apr 13, 10:25am Top

>46 harrygbutler: Interesting. "Banana oil" was a new expression new to me from the Godzilla subtitles, and my assumptions followed. I checked the Oxford English Dictionary, which supports the claim that it is English-language slang though not exclusively American: the OED's earliest documented use of "banana oil" in print in the sense of "nonsense; insincere or insane talk or behaviour" is a 1927 piece by P.G. Wodehouse in the Sunday Express. Wodehouse was still using the expression in 1960, since it appears again in Jeeves in the Offing. My assumptions were clearly incorrect. Thanks for the nudge to look into it further, Harry!

And I really ought to read some Wodehouse ....

49harrygbutler
Edited: Apr 13, 10:25am Top

>47 lyzard: Sure, but I wouldn't necessarily expect Japanese slang in the English-language translation, any more than I'd expect a Japanese translation of the dialogue in an American movie where "Applesauce!" is used to translate that literally.

>48 swynn: And Wodehouse's work may be where I first ran into it, though that's lost in the dim reaches of the past. Thanks for the research, Steve! Everyone ought to read some Wodehouse! :-)

50swynn
Edited: Apr 14, 4:51pm Top



Perry Rhodan 48: Rotes Auge Beteigeuze (= Red Eye Betelgeuse) / Clark Darlton
Date: August 3, 1962
Tagline: An old and nearly forgotten foe appears -- and Gucky wants to see lizards fly ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded Arkonide research cruiser (Volume 1).
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials (Volumes 2-9).
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle" (Volumes 10-18).
1976 - The STARDUST II discovers the planet Wanderer, and Perry Rhodan achieves relative immortality (Volume 19).
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's first contact with Arkon and appointment as the ruling positronic brain's agent in the galactic cluster M-13 (Volumes 38-43)

To protect humanity's homeworld, threatened by Springer and Ara forces, Perry Rhodan has engaged in a risky deception. If it works then the attackers, guided by "corrected" coordinates stored in the computer of Topthor's battleship, will mistake the third planet of Betelgeuse for Earth! The Betelgeuse system is uninhabited according to the old Arkonide star catalogs -- but is the information still accurate? Perry Rhodan's scouts find more than a surprise as they approach the RED EYE BETELGEUSE ...


Convincing the Springers that Betelgeuse-3 is Earth won't be easy: Perry Rhodan will have to convince them that an uninhabited planet is actually home to a highly-developed civilization; and he will have to leverage a handful of ships into the illusion of an entire fleet. Rhodan's plan begins with sending a recon team to Betelgeuse under command of the telepath John Marshall. The scouts soon learn that the system is no longer uninhabited. The target planet Betelgeuse-3 is uninhabited -- well, it is a "jungle planet" which begs the definition of "uninhabited" but at least it has no intelligent life. But aqueous Betelgeuse-4 is home to a species of torpedo-shaped fish people ... and a recently-established colony of Topsiders, the lizard-people who invaded the Vega-Sector back in episodes 10-13.

The Topsiders aren't any friendlier now than they were back then, but Marshall quickly hatches a plan to turn their unexpected appearance to the Terrans' advantage. The scouts allow themselves to be captured, but present themselves as Springers scouting the system for an attack on a secret Terran base. Then when Marshall and his team make a messy escape, the Topsiders will not be kindly disposed to the oncoming Springer fleet. If they're lucky, the Topsiders may even call for reinforcements ...

Teaser for the next adventure: The surprising discovery of humanity's old foes the Topsiders and their base in the Betelgeuse system, have now been drawn into Perry Rhodan's master plan. But will the Topsiders play along when the Springer fleet and the Aras appear ... ? And Topthor, who has already seen Earth's sun with his own eyes: won't he immediately recognize that his computer's data has led him to a false target as soon as he sees the red giant Betelgeuse ... ? Topthor, that is the key figure in the next skirmish ...

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Red Eye of Betelgeuse. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Jim Harmon and Angel Arango, and the ninth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

51swynn
Edited: Apr 15, 3:42pm Top



Perry Rhodan 49: Die Erde stirbt (= Earth Dies) / Clark Darlton
Date: August 10, 1962
Tagline: The end of an epoch -- Earth sinks into a sea of oblivion ...

The story so far: The history of the Third Power in outline:
1971 - The rocket STARDUST reaches the Moon and Perry Rhodan discovers the stranded Arkonide research cruiser (Volume 1).
1972 - Founding of the Third Power against the unified resistance of the terrestrial superpowers and defense against attempted invasions by extraterrestrials (Volumes 2-9).
1975 - The Third Power intercedes in galactic affairs for the first time. Perry Rhodan engages with the Topsiders and attempts to solve the "galactic riddle" (Volumes 10-18).
1976 - The STARDUST II discovers the planet Wanderer, and Perry Rhodan achieves relative immortality (Volume 19).
1980 - Perry Rhodan's return to Earth and the fight over Venus. (Volumes 20-24)
1981 - The Overhead attacks. (Volumes 25-27)
1982/83 - The Springers come to quash Earth's potential as a competitor in galactic trade. (Volumes 28-37)
1984 - Perry Rodan's first contact with Arkon and appointment as the ruling positronic brain's agent in the galactic cluster M-13 (Volumes 38-45) Springers and Aras prepare to destroy Earth (Volumes 46-48)

Earth is to be destroyed -- even for Perry Rhodan's best interests! Of course not the real Earth, home planet of humanity, but the uninhabited third planet of the Betelgeuse system which is "Earth" for the attacking Springers thanks to the falsely-programmed computer on Topthor's battleship! The dramatic production of "Earth's death" must convince all intelligent beings of the galaxy's inhabited worlds: Perry Rhodan's plan is to allow knowledge of Earth's existence to fade into oblivion until Earth can develop itself into a galactic power. Whether that plan will work depends on various factors. One of these factors is Topthor's existence ...


In this adventure Perry Rhodan's plan comes together. The Springers attack; the Topsiders counterattack; and the Springers, mistaking the Topsiders either for Terrans or for Terran allies, believe they have engaged the Terran home world.

It all goes swimmingly for Rhodan. The only wrinkle is Topthor, the only Springer captain who has actually seen the solar system and cannot possibly mistake Betelgeuse for Sol -- and who could blow the whole scheme should he share his knowledge with the rest of the Springer fleet. And indeed, Topthor recognizes something is wrong as soon as he arrives in the system. Topthor withdraws from the space-battle while he contemplates what could have gone wrong and what step to take next ... and on Betelgeuse-4 he meets a Topsider who likewise suspects a trap. Can the Springer and the Topsider communicate their suspicions to their respective forces in time to thwart Rhodan's plan?

Teaser for the next adventure: The goddess of luck and Gucky have brought Rhodan's plan to fruition, whereby Earth has been destroyed in the eyes of all the galaxy's intelligent life. Humanity has thus won some time to develop undisturbed and to begin the construction of a powerful Solar Empire. The dramatic events told in the PERRY RHODAN series' 50th volume, which takes place in the year 2040, bring you to experience the new epoch of human history. An epoch in which Atlan, time's lonely one, plays a grand role ...

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Earth Dies. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by L. Lester Anderson and Sylvius Agricola, and the tenth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

52swynn
Edited: May 12, 5:13pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 50: Der Einsame der Zeit (= Time's Lonely One) / K. H. Scheer
Date: August 17, 1962
Tagline: A fascinating new adventure begins -- the apex of the Perry Rhodan series ...

The story so far:
Perry Rhodan has sought power and recognition for humanity in the universe, but despite clever moves on the galactic stage his efforts have remained piecemeal, for the means available to humanity have been, measured on the scale of the universe, too small.
Since Earth's apparent destruction in 1984, fifty-six years have now passed.
A new generation of humanity has grown up. And just as the Terran world government developed in its time from the "Third Power," so also from that government developed the organization of the Solar Empire.
Mars, Venus, and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn have been colonized, and those worlds of the solar system unsuitable for colonization now serve as Terran bases or as inexhaustible repositories of natural resources of all types.
No other intelligent life has been discovered in the solar system. The Terrans are therefore the unconstested rulers of a small realm of planets surrounding Earth.
This planetary realm, at a high level of technology and civilization, naturally has a battle-ready space fleet ready to defy any agressor.
And that seems to Perry Rhodan sufficient reason for a new push into interstellar space.
But before it comes to that, Perry Rhodan meets TIME'S LONELY ONE ...


This one isn't about Perry Rhodan. It's a first-person story from the perspective of Atlan da Gonozal, a new character who will become such a fixture of the series that he will star in his own spinoff series beginning in 1969 and lasting nearly twenty years. Atlan and Perry will soon become very close friends and allies, but first they have to fight. Because that's the kind of series it is: Atlan is such a strong character that dominance must be established. (Guess who wins?)

Atlan is an Arkonide like Thora and Crest, but a very old one. For reasons not yet clear he has been stranded on Earth for all of human history and even longer. He has intervened occasionally in human history, adopting various personas to prod the development of atomic technology in order to build a spacecraft capable of taking him back home to Arkon. But he has also spent much of the time in suspended animation deep on the ocean floor. At this adventure's opening, Arkon wakes from his most recent sleep. He'd gone under 'way back in the early 1970s when some nutjob named Perry Rhodan was building a new country in the Gobi Desert and pissing off people with atomic weapons. No way was human civilization going to survive *that.*

So when Atlan awakes he expects to find a nuclear wasteland. He is shocked to discover that not only has humanity survived, and not only has nuclear war been averted, and not only is Perry Rhodan still around and spry as ever, and not only has Earth turned into a burgeoning galactic power, but after millennia of waiting Atlan discovers he has *slept* through the event he'd been working toward. Ain't it just the way?

He feels he's waited long enough. He establishes a new identity in order to infiltrate Terrania, where one thing leads to another and he stows away aboard an outbound ship with the intent of hijacking it. Unfortunately for his plans the ship is piloted by Perry Rhodan himself, no easy mark. Excitement ensues and the ship crashes on the extremely unpleasant planet Hellgate, where Atlan and Perry Rhodan engage in a battle of wits and endurance.

Teaser for the next adventure:
What a fascinating figure, this Arkonide Atlan!
For Atlan, who possesses a cell activator, the centuries are just like a day!
Atlan has studied humans since the beginning of recorded history, and he has helped humans when helping also furthered his own plans.
We will hear much more about Atlan!
But next we turn to the Ara-planet Toliman, where the HUNT FOR LIFE begins ...


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Time's Lonely One. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Kris Neville and R.H. Barlow, and the eleventh chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

53swynn
Edited: May 26, 12:09am Top

 

Perry Rhodan 51: Jagd nach dem Leben (= Hunt for Life) / Kurt Brand
Date: August 24, 1962
Tagline: Disturbance in the galactic zoo! A human has escaped ...

The story so far:
Perry Rhodan has sought power and recognition for humanity in the universe, but despite clever moves on the galactic stage his efforts have remained piecemeal, for the means available to humanity have been, measured on the scale of the universe, too small.
Since Earth's apparent destruction in 1984, fifty-six years have now passed.
A new generation of humanity has grown up. And just as the Terran world government developed in its time from the "Third Power," so also from that government developed the organization of the Solar Empire.
Mars, Venus, and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn have been colonized, and those worlds of the solar system unsuitable for colonization now serve as Terran bases or as inexhaustible repositories of natural resources of all types.
No other intelligent life has been discovered in the solar system. The Terrans are therefore the unconstested rulers of a small realm of planets surrounding Earth.
This planetary realm, at a high level of technology and civilization, naturally has a battle-ready space fleet ready to defy any agressor.
But Perry Rhodan, administrator of the Solar Empire, is not yet ready to let drop the protective curtain of anonymity. His cosmic agents -- members of the famous Mutant Corps -- are under orders to keep their earthly origin a secret.
Will the two agents placed on Tolimon follow this order, as they begin the HUNT FOR LIFE ... ?


Fifty-six years have passed since episode 49, and many of our characters have not aged at all thanks to the cellular treatment available to humans on the planet Wanderer. Unfortunately, the treatment is not available to Arkonides like Crest and Thora -- which worries Rhodan because he and Thora have married. He desperately wants to keep her around for a while, but Thora is aging. There are rumors of a rejuventaion serum on the zoo-planet Tolimon, and Rhodan sends two agents to investigate: John Marshall, a series regular and beneficiary of the cellular treatment; and Laury Marten, daughter of Mutant Corps members Anne Sloane and Ralf Marten. Marshall is a telepath; Marten can walk through walls.

Tolimon is a zoo and home to a sprawling research institution. Marten goes undercover as a veterinary student, Marshall as a trader in exotic animals. Marshall's cover is very nearly blown when some inconsistencies appear in his story ... but it's Laury Marten who jeapordizes the mission for the oldest reason there is. There are human captives on Tolimon and have been for centuries, kept alive with the mysterious rejuvenation serum. Among the human captives is a half-Spanish, half-Aztec nobleman from the 17th Century, very dashing, and irresistibly appealing to Marten.

Laury Marten falls in love with Rodrigo de Berceo, so when the research institute decides to reverse experimentally the effects of the rejuvenation serum, she must break him out. Unfortunately Laury and Rodrigo don't get far, and their craft is damaged in the attempt. Together with Marshall they go into hiding and send a telepathic distress call to Rhodan. But the planet is swarming with Springers and Aras -- will Rhodan arrive in time?

Teaser for the next adventure:
John Marshall and Laury Marten, the two cosmic agents inserted onto the Ara-world Tolimon, have doubtless achieved a partial victory by acquiring an ampule of the life-extending serum.
But they were not able to leave Tolimon!
Perry Rhodan sees that it is up to him to intervene. He comes with Gucky as THE FALSE INSPECTOR!


The chilling cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Life Hunt. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Forrest Ackerman and Matt Graham, and the twelfth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

54swynn
May 26, 11:47pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 52: Der falsche Inspekteur (= The Fake Inspector) / Clark Darlton
Date: August 31, 1962
Tagline: He who deals with Gucky loses his beard -- or his pants ...

The story so far:
Perry Rhodan has sought power and recognition for humanity in the universe, but despite clever moves on the galactic stage his efforts have remained piecemeal, for the means available to humanity have been, measured on the scale of the universe, too small.
Since Earth's apparent destruction in 1984, fifty-six years have now passed.
A new generation of humanity has grown up. And just as the Terran world government developed in its time from the "Third Power," so also from that government developed the organization of the Solar Empire.
Mars, Venus, and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn have been colonized, and those worlds of the solar system unsuitable for colonization now serve as Terran bases or as inexhaustible repositories of natural resources of all types.
No other intelligent life has been discovered in the solar system. The Terrans are therefore the unconstested rulers of a small realm of planets surrounding Earth.
This planetary realm, at a high level of technology and civilization, naturally has a battle-ready space fleet ready to defy any agressor.
But Perry Rhodan, administrator of the Solar Empire, is not yet ready to let drop the protective curtain of anonymity. His cosmic agents -- members of the famous Mutant Corps -- are under orders to keep their earthly origin a secret.
An important mission on the Ara-world Tolimon seems to have broken down, and Perry Rhodan appears accompanied by Gucky to pull his agents out.
Perry Rhodan is THE FAKE INSPECTOR!


John Martin, Laury Martin, and Laury's new squeeze are trapped and hiding on the zoo-planet Tolimon. As the planet's Ara government hunts the Mutant Corps agents Perry Rhodan and Gucky arrive, impersonating an Arkonide inspector and his faithful manservant. Rhodan's disguise is solid, but not without its flaws so Gucky serves as a distraction, encouraging the planet's zookeeper officials to spend more time plotting to kidnap Gucky instead of double-checking Rhodan's credentials. And so they do, following Gucky on a merry chase as he simultaneously scans the area for the missing agents' telepathic signatures.

And because we have all seen The Inspector General we expect that eventually the *real* inspector will arrive, blowing Perry Rhodan's cover and complicating his team's escape. Our expectations are not disappointed.

Teaser for the next adventure:
Accidents can destroy the best of plans! So it happened on the Ara-world Tolimon when Perry Rhodan, the purported inspector of Arkon, was confronted unexpectedly with the existence of a real inspector.
Perry Rhodan and his people nevertheless were able to put the dangerous planet far behind them But no less dangerous is the world to which they flee!
Kurt Mahr tells all about it in his novel with the title THE DAMNED OF ISAN.


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Pseudo One. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by Forrest Ackerman and Robert Lowndes, and the thirteenth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

55lyzard
May 27, 6:39pm Top

The fact that the real inspector doesn't travel with a Gucky wasn't enough to give it away?

56swynn
Edited: May 29, 4:01pm Top

>55 lyzard: Yeah ... straining credibility is sort of a series feature, but this one's an outlier even by the usual loose standards.

Pushkin's plot works where you're talking about an environment with marginal communication networks; in the Perryverse with near-instantaneous communication across lightyears the idea that Perry can bluster his way past career bureaucrats with a fishy cover story and an exotic pet is just too much.

For what it's worth, you don't get the sense this episode is intended to be taken seriously. Much of it is just the broad slapstick humor of Gucky's shenanigans. Officious people in uniform lose their pants, for example.

Gucky has his fans. One of them I ain't.

57swynn
Edited: Jun 10, 10:40pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 53: Die Verdammten von Isan (= The Damned of Isan) / Kurt Mahr
Date: September 7, 1962
Tagline: Their world suffered a fate that Earth was spared at the last second ...

The story so far:
Perry Rhodan has sought power and recognition for humanity in the universe, but despite clever moves on the galactic stage his efforts have remained piecemeal, for the means available to humanity have been, measured on the scale of the universe, too small.
Since Earth's apparent destruction in 1984, fifty-six years have now passed.
A new generation of humanity has grown up. And just as the Terran world government developed in its time from the "Third Power," so also from that government developed the organization of the Solar Empire.
Mars, Venus, and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn have been colonized, and those worlds of the solar system unsuitable for colonization now serve as Terran bases or as inexhaustible repositories of natural resources of all types.
No other intelligent life has been discovered in the solar system. The Terrans are therefore the unconstested rulers of a small realm of planets surrounding Earth.
This planetary realm, at a high level of technology and civilization, naturally has a battle-ready space fleet ready to defy any agressor.
But Perry Rhodan, administrator of the Solar Empire, is not yet ready to let drop the protective curtain of anonymity. His cosmic agents -- members of the famous Mutant Corps -- are under orders to keep their earthly origin a secret.
A mission on the Ara-world Tolimon almost led to a catastrophe, averted in the end by the "fake inspector."
Perry Rhodan and his crew must flee, but in their hasty flight they encounter THE DAMNED OF ISAN.


Escaping the zoo-planet Tolimon, Perry Rhodan and his team look for an out-of the way system where they can lie low until they can be sure they haven't been followed. They comes upon Isan, a planet whose blasted surface is uninhabitable due to the effects of a nuclear war. Isan's remnant population, reduced to some 100,000 from a pre-war population of 3 billion, lives in a number of underground bunkers. And still they fight.

Things are pretty bad in the bunker Fenomat, where food supplies are exhausted and the survivors are surviving on chemically-treated textiles. Worse, they discover that survivors in the nearby bunker Sallon are digging a tunnel toward them, presumably for no diplomatic purpose. Just as the force from Sallon arrives and the battle begins, so also arrives Perry Rhodan. With hypno-beams and the Mutant Corps it's quick work to take over both bunkers.

Though he captures both bunkers' command centers Rhodan doesn't capture Bellal, the erstwhile leader of Sallon. Bellal leads a guerilla campaign and plots to kill Rhodan. The assassination fails but in the attempt Bellal kills Rodrigo de Berceo, the sixteenth-century Spanish count Laury Marten rescued from the zoo. Recall that Laury's crush on Berceo is what started the whole mess. You'd think she'd be devastated by his death, but no: the last few hours on Isan have convinced Laury that Berceo was hopelessly stuck in the 16th century and not somebody she could stand long-term. Actually, she's sort of relieved he's dead. And yes, it's just that creepy.

Anyway, Rhodan eventually captures Bellal and wraps thing up. He calls in some supplies from Earth, which he hopes will be just the first shipment in a long-term trade relationship between Earth and Isan.

Teaser for the next adventure:
Dear Perry Rhodan reader!
Our anniversary issue TIME'S LONELY ONE is surely still fresh in your memory. Many readers have written that it is a real high point of our grand space opera series PERRY RHODAN.
K.H. Scheer has written another, maybe even more fascinating Atlan-adventure that will appear next week as Perry Rhodan volume 54: THE DUEL.


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Unknown Sector: Milky Way (I assume because Americans can't say "Damned" in the title of a book with a significant juvenile audience). The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Barrington J. Bayley and Greg Akers, and the fourteenth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

58swynn
Jun 14, 10:15pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 54: Der Zweikampf (= The Duel) / K.H. Scheer
Tagline: The prisoner of the Solar Secret Service plays his secret trump cards. -- The second Atlan-adventure!

The story so far:
For Atlan, the lonely one of time, the centuries are like only a day for he has a mysterious cell-vibration activator.
He has studied humans since the beginnings of known history and he helps humans when such support at the same time advances his own plans.
Atlan wants to return home to Arkon, the world of three planets!
Atlan has come to love the brave little barbarians of Terra -- even if he sometimes does not want to admit it.
Atlan feared the atomic war that threatened in 1971 and retreated to his deep-sea base -- but when he woke from his deep sleep 69 years later he found a world completely changed!
Atlan finds himself near the fulfillment of his longings -- Only one thing stand in his way: Perry Rhodan, administrator of the Solar Imperium!
Perry Rhodan, who thinks only of the welfare of humanity, must deny Atlan the voyage home.
But can Perry Rhodan do that? Or is Atlan the better opponent thanks to his many centuries' experience?
In the exciting duel on the hot planet Hellgate it was Perry Rhodan who proved himself the better!
Atlan has been detained by the Solar Secret Service, but his thoughts are already occupied with the possibilities of a second escape.
Will Atlan achieve his wishes' goal?


Atlan may be a prisoner of the secret service but Rhodan sees him as a future ally, so his detainment is quite liberal. He is even allowed out of his comfortable quarters to lecture at the University of Terrania, an opportunity he uses to mix socially among the students and to groom allies of his own.

Atlan escapes Terrania, jets around the world to throw followers off his trail, hatches a new plan to escape the solar system, adopts a new identity, and makes his way to Venus to meet up with countercultural contacts. From a series perspective, the point is to establish setting: Earth and Venus have changed in dramatically since we last visited them fifty years ago, turning into zippy worlds of the future.

The story ends in a showdown as of course it must: this one taking place in a museum on Venus. Atlan gains the upper hand in this one and very nearly defeats Rhodan -- then suddenly realizes that he likes Rhodan and wants to be his friend and so concedes. It isn't any more plausible than it sounds, but that's how it goes.

Teaser for the next adventure:
Atlan is no longer a danger to the Solar Empire's existence, for the Arkonide has now clearly recognized that that resisting Perry Rhodan's plans is pointless and even deterimental to his own plans.
But then something happens which nobody could have expected: Perry Rhodan's wife Thora is abducted, and the mutants rebel ....


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Again Atlan!. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Forrest J. Ackerman, Francis Flagg, and Taimi Leith Saha, and the fifteenth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

59lyzard
Jun 15, 2:19am Top

>57 swynn:

Recall that Laury's crush on Berceo is what started the whole mess.

Those indecisive women, huh??

>58 swynn:

Atlan gains the upper hand in this one and very nearly defeats Rhodan -- then suddenly realizes that he likes Rhodan and wants to be his friend and so concedes.

Those indecisive men, huh??

At least he's an equal-opportunity eyebrow-raiser. :D

60swynn
Edited: Jun 15, 1:54pm Top

>59 lyzard: Laury at least has some justification for her change in feelings. The story does blame their situation on a "girlish trick" (lit.: Jungmädchenstreich), but it's a bit more complex than my summary gives credit. The Atlan thing, though is weird because Atlan says, "Well, if I can't beat him I'll join him" just as he's about to beat him.

One nice thing about the Laury-Rodrigo story is its reversal of a familiar trope. Although Star Trek came later, it makes a good example: every couple of weeks Captain Kirk fell in love with some gorgeous local girl for a single episode only to see her killed near the end, evoking anger and regret.

In this one, we have the young woman adventurer falling in love with a gorgeous local man. How gorgeous? Well, just look at the exclamation points:

Mixed blood -- Aztec blood and Spanish blood had united in Count Rodrigo to a masculine beauty!
How his eyes glowed!
How lordly his mouth appeared!
His nose was a little too large, and exactly this excess gave his masculine face the accent of a glowing warrior, of a proud man!


Per trope, adventure follows. In contrast to the Captain Kirk version, though, in which the adventurer questions his commitment to a life of lonely adventuring we find Laury increasingly irritated by Rodrigo's 17th-century habits and assumptions:

After Rodrigo explained at length and detail how the arrangement of a man's personal affairs would have to confront the fact of his love, Laury's enthusiasm for the Spanish-Aztec count weakened.

Rodrigo's inability to adapt quickly to his 21st-century environment makes him a nuisance and even a danger:

One night, after she had looked after the injured Gucky, Laury found the count in the aggregation chamber. With a multitool he had removed the deckplate of the defense-field generator and was tracing the routes of colorful circuits in the shine of powerful flashlight.
As Rodrigo heard Laury's steps he stood, turned, and smiled at the girl.
"I don't think I'm ever going to find the steam engine," he said sadly.


Even to the reader Rodrigo becomes pathetic. Finally he succumbs to a terminal case of foolhardiness when he runs outside the facility's defense shield. All of this may still be according to trope, as the beloved finds it difficult to adapt to the adventurer's world. But the Kirkish anger and regret? Forget that:

Laury Marten bore Rodrigo's death calmly. Rhodan was happy that she already had seen for some time how her suddenly-ignited love for the Aztec-Spanish count had played a girlish trick.

So: it's an interesting gender-reversal of a trope that was already tired when Captain Kirk started doing it (worth pointing out because this story precedes Star Trek), but the indifference to Rodrigo's death is a bit weird. The authorial tone toward the character is so different from one adventure to the next that I wonder whether one author thought a dashing sixteenth-century count would make a great recurring character, and the next just said, "Hell no I'm killing him."

61lyzard
Jun 15, 6:02pm Top

That sounds more like the situation with Marla McGivers. With Kirk you could just kill the girl off and move on, but Marla had to be left behind with her improbable love interest---and we only have Khan's word for it how it worked out afterwards. :D

62swynn
Edited: Jun 28, 9:14am Top

 

Perry Rhodan 55: Der Schatten des Overhead (= Shadow of the Overhead) / Kurt Brand
Tagline: Red alert at the Solar Space Fleet -- a cosmic agent sends an emergency call ....

The story so far:
Despite clever moves on the galactic stage, Perry Rhodan's pursuit of power and recognition for humanity in the universe has remained piecemeal, for the means available to humanity, measured on the scale of the universe, have been too small.
Since Earth's apparent destruction in 1984, fifty-six years have now passed.
A new generation of humanity has grown up. And just as the Terran world government developed in its time from the "Third Power," so also from that government developed the organization of the Solar Empire.
Mars, Venus, and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn have been colonized, and those worlds of the solar system unsuitable for colonization now serve as Terran bases or as inexhaustible repositories of natural resources of all types.
No other intelligent life has been discovered in the solar system. The Terrans are therefore the unconstested rulers of a small realm of planets surrounding Earth.
This planetary realm, at a high level of technology and civilization, naturally has a battle-ready space fleet ready to defy any agressor.
But Perry Rhodan, administrator of the Solar Empire, is not yet ready to let drop the protective curtain of anonymity. His cosmic agents -- members of the famous Mutant Corps -- are under orders to keep their earthly origin a secret.
Until now Perry Rhodan has been able to rely on his mutants one hundred percent -- but events in the Heprés System show that even mutants are only human with every human flaw and weakness ...


Ralph Sikeron, a Mutant Corps agent on the planet Volat, goes silent after one last transmission: "Three Bells," code for extreme danger to Earth. Perry Rhodan sends Fellmer Lloyd to investigate. Lloyd quickly inserts into Volat disguised as an Arkonide colonist. Hoping to search through his Sikeron's office, where the missing agent worked under the cover of a Springer merchant. Lloyd discovers that the office has already been broken into. Lloyd also meets a Springer, Kuri Oneré, who works in the same building and who knew and liked Sikeron. She tells Lloyd that several others have already come looking for the missing agent, and that before he disappeared Sikeron had confided in her that he might someday disappear and that a friend might come looking for him, and that she should direct the friend to the "All-Wise Mother" of the insectoid indigenes, the Volaters. Though Sikeron's office has been well turned over, Lloyd discovers one ominous clue: an appointment calender, with a delivery marked with the term "Overhead." (The Overhead, being of course, the megalomaniacal psychic supervillain with a silly name who was killed in episode 27.)

After some chasing and shooting, Lloyd makes his way deep into the jungle where the Volaters introduce him to their All-Wise Mother. The Mother tells him what she know about Sikeron's situation: in particular, she knows that Sikeron's enemy was actually two people working together. Lloyd returns to the colonial city, puts together a team to rassle up more clues. It turns out that it is not the Overhead who threatened Sikeron, but two of his former henchmen who have since found service with Perry Rhodan. They are mutants with moderate powers and suspect character whom Rhodan did not offer the life-extending cell-bath. They resent this slight, and intend to avenge themselves by revealing Earth's location to Arkon. To foil the plot, Lloyd must find a way on board the traitors' spaceship, in whose computer the Earth's coordinates are stored. Then escape, if possible.

Teaser for the next adventure:
Two members of the Mutant Corps, the Terrans' strongest force for Peace in the galaxy, have broken their allegiance to Perry Rhodan. But nothing is yet lost, for it seems the two mutants have not yet divulged their knowledge to any strangers! Whether they will continue to remain silent when their situation becomes critical, is another question ....

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Shadow of the Mutant Master. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Kris Nelson and Ralph O. Hughes, Jr., and the sixteenth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

63lyzard
Jun 27, 11:54pm Top

That one sounds disappointingly sensible.

64swynn
Jun 28, 9:10am Top

>63 lyzard: Well, Gucky returns in the next episode so ....

65swynn
Jul 2, 4:53pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 56: Die Toten leben (= The Dead Live) / Clark Darlton
Tagline: The regent of Arkon learns the truth -- and Gucky finds a new friend ....

The story so far:
Despite clever moves on the galactic stage, Perry Rhodan's pursuit of power and recognition for humanity in the universe has remained piecemeal, for the means available to humanity, measured on the scale of the universe, have been too small.
Since Earth's apparent destruction in 1984, fifty-six years have passed.
A new generation of humanity has grown up. And just as the Terran world government developed in its time from the "Third Power," so also from that government developed the organization of the Solar Empire.
Mars, Venus, and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn have been colonized, and those worlds of the solar system unsuitable for colonization now serve as Terran bases or as inexhaustible repositories of natural resources of all types.
No other intelligent life has been discovered in the solar system. The Terrans are therefore the unconstested rulers of a small realm of planets surrounding Earth.
This planetary realm, at a high level of technology and civilization, naturally has a battle-ready space fleet ready to defy any agressor.
But Perry Rhodan, administrator of the Solar Empire, is not yet ready to let drop the protective curtain of anonymity. His cosmic agents -- members of the famous Mutant Corps -- are under orders to keep their earthly origin a secret.
But when he goes personally to the crisis point Heperés, it is to the unpredictable coincidence that Talamon, the old Superheavy, makes the shocking recognition that THE DEAD LIVE ...


In the last adventure Mutant Corps agent Fellmer Lloyd solved the mystery of Ralph Sikeron's disappearance. But Lloyd's craft was shot down while escaping the planet. Lloyd is left stranded but able to send the distress signal "Three bells" back to Earth, along with the news Sikeron was murdered by Gregor Tropnow and Nomo Yatuhin, two traitorous Mutant Corps agents who plan to reveal Earth's location to Arkon. Perry Rhodan decides to intervene personally, with help from Andre Noir and Gucky. But just before the jump to Volat they get the news that Gregor Tropnow has kidnapped Rhodan's wife Thora. Because alien apocalypse is insufficient motive, I guess.

Adventure follows: Rhodan's space-jet is shot down as it arrives on the planet, they are attacked by hypnotically controlled panther people, they meet up with the Volats and Fellmer Lloyd, and Gucky scouts the enemy headquarters. Rhodan hatches an elaborate plan that involves (1) calling Arkon for reinforcements in response to a local uprising, (2) starting a fight with Tropnow's and Yatuhin's forces, then (3) convincing the Arkonides when they arrive that the traitors' forces are actually anti-Arkon rebels. If the plan works, then Arkon itself will destroy the forces that would have supported it, and will distrust the traitors' news of Earth should any happen to leak anyway.

Spoiler: Rhodan's team very nearly escapes with Earth's secrecy intact, except that the Springer Talamon happens to be on-planet and recognizes Rhodan as he leaves.

Teaser for the next adventure:
The two traitors from the ranks of the Mutant Corps can no longer betray anything, but Talamon has informed the Robot Regent that Perry Rhodan remains among the living. The galaxy's power-political situation already precarious -- and now it happens that even on Earth, political elements activate, working to overturn the current order ....

The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Dead Live. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Matt Graham and Forrest J. Ackerman, and the seventeenth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

66lyzard
Jul 3, 1:50am Top

they are attacked by hypnotically controlled panther people

Aww, I hate it when that happens!

67swynn
Jul 9, 8:31pm Top

>66 lyzard: ... and it's surprising how often it does!

68swynn
Jul 9, 9:23pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 57: Die Attentäter (= The Assassins) / Kurt Mahr
Tagline: They want to murder the Adminstrator of the Solar Empire! The first colonist adventure!

The story so far:
The Robot Regent of Arkon has been informed that the destruction of Earth was nothing more than a cleverly planned bluff -- and thus the moment that Perry Rhodan has been secretly dreading comes dangerously near, of a showdown between the Solar Empire and Arkon.
Is the Terran Empire really strong enough to protect itself against the most powerful attackers ... ?
But Perry Rhodan, the Solar Administrator has still more worries!
Recently, elements on Earth have become active who work toward the overthrow of the current political order.
They are THE ASSASSINS ...


Horace Mullon is an agent for the Upright Democrats, an underground organization who regard Perry Rhodan as a dictator who must be removed in order to restore democracy to Earth. Horace arrives in Terrania on a mission to figure out how to do this. He meets another discontent, Walter Hollander of the Natural Philosophers. The Upright Democrats and the Natural Philosophers have incompatible philosophies but share a single goal -- and so Mullon and Hollander make a temporary pact to eliminate Rhodan. They fail.

As punishment Rhodan sends Mullon, Hollander, and their revolutionary compatriots into exile. Rhodan has a vision of spreading humanity throughout the galaxy, establishing colonies with a variety of political strategies. Mullon and Hollander of course are unhappy with their fate, but Mullon comes to peace with it and looks forward to establishing a democracy in his new home. When Hollander leads a mutiny on the colony ship, Mullon realizes that Hollander would be a leader even worse than Rhodan, and organizes the countermutiny.

Teaser for the next adventure:
In a highly civilized political system like the Solar Empire there is no longer any death penalty!
Therefore the ASSASSINS were sent into exile and lost their Terran civil rights!
And so they have become interstellar colonists!
Will these 8000 exiles be able to master their fate ...?
You will hear more about these interstellar settlers in Perry Rhodan volume 62, while next week Clark Darlton tells about "THE GREAT DISAPPEARANCE," which threatens all life in the Milky Way ....


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Solar Assassins. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Donald A. Wollheim, and the twentieth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

69swynn
Edited: Aug 29, 7:28pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 58: Attacke aus dem Unsichtbaren (= Attack from the Unseen) / Clark Darlton
Date: October 19, 1962
Tagline: The Unseen attack -- and the great disappearance begins ...

The story so far:
The Robot Regent of Arkon has been informed that the destruction of Earth was nothing more than a cleverly planned bluff -- and thus the moment that Perry Rhodan has been secretly dreading comes dangerously near, of a showdown between the Solar Empire and Arkon.
Is the Terran Empire really strong enough to protect itself against the most powerful attackers ... ?
So far the Solar System's galactic position remains a secret -- so far Arkon can dispatch no war fleet, even if the Robot Regent wanted to take such a step ...
But suddenly there occurs an event that makes allies of Terra and Arkon!
The Robot Regent needs help, for the ATTACKS FROM THE UNSEEN threaten all life in the Milky Way ...


Since learning that Rhodan is still alive, the Robot Regent of Arkon has been sending a continuous broadcast requesting that Rhodan contact it. Rhodan does so, and agrees to meet the Regent's representatives on Mirsal III. He worries that the Robot Regent will be hostile but the interview takes an entirely different direction: the Regent asks Rhodan for help. The Arkonide empire has been under attack by some mysterious invisible force that attacks without warning, is able to remove all of a planet's fauna from colonists to insects overnight.

What Arkon describes is clearly a threat to Rhodan's plans as well so he agrees to help. But no sooner does the meeting wrap up than the unseen force attacks Mirsal III and victims simply disappear. Rhodan is helpless to do anything but evacuate his own forces, but sees losses among them as well. A series of clues leads Rhodan to believe that the force will attack nearby Mirsal II next.

Teaser for the next adventure:
THE ATTACK FROM THE UNSEEN represents a danger in which all intelligent beings of the Milky Way must stand together and find means of defense, unless they want to vanish without a trace like the lamented inhabitants of Mirsal III.
What has happened to the Mirsalese .... ?
Nobody knows yet, but a trail seems to loom, leading to a planet nearer the same system's sun, which will have to be followed if one wants to engage the weird enemy!
RETURN FROM THE VOID -- that is the title of the next Perry-Rhodan novel, in which Kurt Mahr writes of three Terrans who want to rescue a world damned to destruction ...


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Return from the Void. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by Coil Kepac, and the twenty-first chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

70swynn
Edited: Aug 29, 7:29pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 59: Rückkehr aus dem Nichts (= Return from the void) / Kurt Mahr
Tagline: The hole in space swallows the population of a planet -- but three Terrans return ...

The story so far:
Terra and Arkon are allies again, for events have occurred that threaten all life in the Milky Way.
The "Attack from the Unseen" represents a danger, in which all intelligent life in the galaxy must stand together find defenses, unless they want to disappear without a trace like the population of Mirsal III.
And it comes to this, that two superbattleships-- one built on Earth and the other on Arkon -- advance together at light-speed to the second planet of the sun Mirsal, where the weird adversary begins its next attack.
The population of Mirsal II are humanoid. Their civilization has reached approximately the same level of development as Earth at the end of the 20th century.
If the Mirsalese should fall victim to the weird adversary without a fight ...
Perry Rhodan wants to prevent their downfall and dispatches a team of specialists ...


Rhodan's team -- Lieutenant Marcel Rous, telepath Fellmer Lloyd, and cosmo-psychologist Rosita Peres -- lands on Mirsal II just before the "unseen" attacks again. By generating a defensive field, the team is able to ward off the encroaching disappearance-force, though they still have no idea about its nature. The defence-field gives them some flexibility to investigate and to organize an evacuation. They cannot save everyone, though, and Peres counts among the victims.

Whatever the invisible force may be, it seems with few exceptions to disappear living beings only. By examing inorganic objects left behind through radioactive testing, they discover that that objects caught within the force age thousands of years. These findings lead Rous to speculate that the invisible force is actually a different space-time place intersecting our own for reasons yet to be determined. Rous adapts one of the generators of their defensive field, making the generator produce a tightly concentrated field that links the planes in a way that makes it possible to visit the other plane within a bubble of their own space-time.

Rous and Lloyd discover that time moves glacially slow in the other plane, 72,000 times slower in fact: 20 hours pass in our universe while only a second passes in the other. Inhabitants of the other universe are like granite statues.Rous and Lloyd rescue Peres, but otherwise it's an information-gathering expedition. When they return they find the attack from the unseen accelerated so that the defensive field can no longer hold. A partial evacuation proceeds, but the adventure closes with Rhodan's team marginally wiser but no closer to a counterstrategy than before.

Teaser for the next adventure:
The "hole in space" has once again swallowed all life on a planet -- though three Terran special agents have managed not only to outwit the uncanny adversary but to ensure that at least a fraction of the Mirsalese population were saved from the "great disappearance."
The next Perry-Rhodan novel "Fortress Atlantis" is another Atlan-adventure written by K.H. Scheer.
Atlan, time's lonely one, reports from 10,000 years in the past -- though past and present converge with each other, for Atlan has already encountered the uncanny ....


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Attack from the Unseen. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Ralph Hughes and Adrian Hayworth, and the twenty-second chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

71swynn
Edited: Aug 6, 10:53pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 60: Festung Atlantis (= Fortress Atlantis) / K. H. Scheer
Tagline: Arkonides defend the solar system - 10,000 years ago. - The third Atlan adventure!

The story so far:
For Atlan, the lonely one of time, the centuries are like only a day, for he has a mysterious cell-vibration activator.
Since the beginning of human history Atlan has dwelt on Earth-- as observer and helper of humankind!
Has Atlan played out his secret role as mentor to humanity, now that he has learned about the concentration of power and the civilization achievements of the Solar Empire under the leadership of Perry Rhodan ...?
No and again no! Atlan's knowledge of history and his experiences with the mysterious ones from the other dimension make this old and yet so young Arkonide a key figure in galactic events!
Atlan reports -- and what he reports combines a 10,000-year past with the present into a dramatic whole ...


Perry Rhodan returns to Earth from Mirsal II with reports about the unseen enemy. The story sounds chillingly familiar to Atlan, who relates his memories from 10,000 years ago ...

Back then, Atlan was sent to investigate charges of corruption against the administrator of the Arkonide colony on Venus. After sorting out that mess, he approved an emigration of 50,000 colonists to the next planet over, where they settled a large island they named "Atlantis" in Atlan's honor. Shortly afterward, Atlan was called away to serve in a war against methane-breathing invaders of the Empire. But soon Atlan was recalled again to the colony on Venus, which had been attacked by an invisible enemy and depopulated parts of the planet. Rhodan arranged a an evacuation of Venus, and prepared for a full-on attack by the unseen enemy.

When the assault came it arrived as a wave of destruction, against which conventional weapons were useless. But the Arkonide ships are able to slow and weaken the field temporarily with "impulse converters." The impulse converters were not enough, and many Arkonide ships were lost, along with the entire Venus colony. Atlan and a few survivors escaped to Atlantis, though they knew it Earth was almost certainly the next target. The Arkonides prepared against that day, evacuating all but 10,000 settlers, equipping all of their ships with impulse converters, and building a survival dome deep beneath the ocean.

One more unexpected gesture of help arrived from a mysterious source. A telepathic stranger passed through the system with the news that he/it was interested in helping the Arkonide Empire. He offered Atlan a personalized cell-activator which would make him practically immortal. The stranger also offered plans for a "converter canon", a 5-dimensional weapon able to dematerialize its target.

As Atlan concludes his story, Perry Rhodan identifies the stranger as IT, the master of planet Wanderer where Rhodan himself acquired relative immortality. To Atlan questions about the converter canon, Rhodan responds that there are legends about a powerful weapon that decisively defeated the methane breathers. Unfortunately, the plans for the legendary weapon are lost to time ...

Teaser for the next adventure: Atlan, Crystal Prince and Space Admiral, who knew the old and energetic Arkonides of a 10,000-year-old past, cannot bring himself to sympathize with the Arkon of the present.
Therefore he feels drawn to a true friendship with Perry Rhodan and his Terrans.
Atlan now belongs to the crew of the space-giant DRUSUS -- and with his profound knowledge becomes a key figure in unmasking the identity of the ROBOT-SPY on board ...


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Fortress Atlantis. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Henry Melton and Elaine MacLane, and the twenty-third chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

72swynn
Edited: Aug 8, 9:57pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 61: Der Robot-Spion (= The Robot Spy) / Clark Darlton
Tagline: Robots make mistakes too -- even when they have two brains!
Date: November 2, 1962

The story so far:
The superbattleship DRUSUS waits motionless in space.
Perry Rhodan waits for signals from the cosmic agents he dispatched to alert him promptly about new attacks by the weirdness from the other dimension.
After thorough calculations Perry Rhodan has concluded that the appearances of the unknown force are not arbitrarily chosen actions, but rather statistically chosen. Based on these data, the overlapping of two time-planes seems to depend on certain rules that can be logically determined with the appropriate means.
And that is the reason wyho not only Perry Rhodan with the DRUSUS, but also many other units of the Solar Fleet have swarmed into space.
The DRUSUS also receives a message of highest urgency -- though this message is nothing other a clever maneuver of the ROBOT-SPY ...


The "message of highest urgency" comes from Jost Kulman, an undercover agent on planet Swoofon; the message is "Three Bells," indicating extreme danger for Earth. The DRUSUS rushes to Swoofon and picks up Kulman along with Muzzel, his dachshund-like "possonkal" pet. Strangely, Kulman insists that he doesn't remember sending the emergency call; what's more he had no reason to send one. Gucky determines telepathically that he's telling the truth. Gucky also strikes up a friendship with Muzzel, who is up for a standing game of hide & seek.

But when the DRUSUS jumps out of the system, the communications crew picks up a strange signal -- one which seems to originate from the DRUSUS itself, one which could be used to locate the ship. When they jump again, the signal reoccurs and they conclude that somebody on board is trying to help Arkon follow the ship all the way to Earth. But who? Kulman and Muzzel are the obvious candidates. But Kulman passes every telepathic examination Gucky puts him to; and Muzzel is clearly nothing but a possonkal. The mystery deepens: at the origin of the latest signal, an investigative team discovers a microscopic transmitter, which really could have been dropped by anybody. And as Atlan approaches the truth he is attacked and knocked unconscious.

Really, the mystery is not especially mysterious. You've probably already figured it out. If the thought of a dachsund spy for the robot overlord gives you a kick -- as it does me -- then you won't be disappointed.

Teaser for the next adventure: It has been shown that even a perfect combination of biological breeding and robot technology equipped with two brains can make mistakes that can lead to a final exposure.
If the Robot Regent of Arkon wants to take further steps to discover the position of Earth -- a secret successfully kept so far -- then he must try something else!
The theme of the next Perry Rhodan novel is a direct follow-up to volume 57 in the series!
Kurt Mahr continues uninterrupted from the dramatic events of his first colonist-adventure, and gives a thrilling account of the further fates of the 8,000 exiled Terrans on the planet GRAY BEAST.


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Spybot!. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by Greg Akers, a poem by Forrest J. Ackerman, and the twenty-fourth chapter of a serialization of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

73lyzard
Aug 9, 1:12am Top

>72 swynn:

It does! :D

74swynn
Edited: Aug 10, 3:56pm Top

>73 lyzard: I thought it might. This episode also has this great line:

Wie immer stand Farrington mit seinem Staubsaugerkommando zum Einsatz bereit.

Context is: Once they discover a microtransmitter at one signal's origin, they go hunting for them every time a signal is sent. Consequently, every time the DRUSUS jumps, they have a sort of CSI team ready to sweep for evidence should a signal recur.

As always, Farrington stood with his vacuum-cleaner command ready for action.

"Staubsaugerkommando." It's a word, and this is proof. Now *that* is the action for me.

75lyzard
Aug 10, 9:28pm Top

The Staubsaugerkommando don't do housecleaning as a sideline, by any chance??

76swynn
Aug 11, 10:28pm Top

>75 lyzard: I expect so. I mean, they have to do something to maintain skills between counterespionage assignments against robot overlords. Might as well monetize that.

77swynn
Edited: Aug 12, 11:59pm Top

Here's one of those cryptic German expressions:

"Hand und Fuß haben", literally, "to have hand and foot"

From episode 75 (yeah, I'm so far behind ...):
Bullys Berechnungen schienen nämlich Hand und Fuß zu haben, wie meine sorgfältige Kontrolle bewiesen hatte.

"Bully's calculations seemed to have hand and foot, as my careful checking had proved."

I'll hide the translation in a spoiler tag for those who want to guess.

"to make sense". The negative apparently is also used: the online German dictionary dict.leo.org suggests "having neither hand nor foot" as a translation for "having no rhyme or reason"

78MickyFine
Aug 14, 12:26pm Top

Idioms in other languages are delightful.

79swynn
Edited: Aug 28, 8:18pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 62: Die blauen Zwerge (= The Blue Dwarves) / Kurt Mahr
Tagline: 8000 exiles want to survive! -- The second colonist-adventure!
Date: November 9, 1962

The story so far:
They were eight thousand men and women -- in an age where conquering an alien world should be no impossible undertaking!
On Earth they had been found guilty of fomenting revolution, condemned to permanent exile, and shipped away in a giant interstellar transport ship.
The exiles overpowered the ship's crew and reached a previously unknown sector of the Milky Way.
The ship accomplished nothing more on the new target planet than a crash landing, by which two-thirds of their supplies became unusable. From the rest they built a small town and named it Greenwich. Their new world they gave the name Gray Beast.
They settled in and began to bring the planet under control. They were Terrans and belonged to the most energetic intelligences of the Milky Way. They could have created a paradise - if only it weren't for the enmity between two men: Horace O. Mullon and W. S. Hollander.
One is an enthusiastic advocate of democracy, the other a determined supporter of dictatorship ...


The would-be revolutionaries from Episode 57 have founded a colony, but the rivalry continues between leaders of the factions: Horace Mullon of the Upright Democrats on one side, and W.S. Hollander of the Natural Philosophers. As Mullon prepares expeditions to explore the region near their base, Hollander plans a coup. To complicate the political troubles, a disease breaks out in the colony, whose symptoms are blue pustules covering the entire body.

Political intrigue mixes with worldbuilding, as Mullon and his allies try to manage expeditions while dealing with sabotage, assassination attempts, and insurrection. They meet two intelligent native species. One, a tribe of monkey-like creatures, protects an expedition from hostile wildlife and supplies an antidote to the blue-spot disease. Unpleasently, the antidote consists in a certain leaf chewed to pulp by a monkey-creature, expectorated and taken internally. But, whatever works. The other new neighbors, the "blue dwarfs" are telepathic beings with clothlike bodies so delicate they same to be made of blue light. They are especially helpful because they rescue Mullon after a nearly-successful assassination attempt. So nearly successful, in fact, that Hollander's faction believe Mullon is dead. It takes some time for the blue dwarfs to nurse Mullon back to health, and by then Hollander has taken control of the colony ...

Teaser for the next adventure:
What human healing arts could not accomplish, the medical knowledge of the BLUE DWARFS has made a reality: Horace O. Mullon, the democratic leader of the free settlers, has recovered from his fatal wound, and from now on can apply his energies to benefit the 8000 Terrans exiled to Gray Beast ...
You can read more on the further fate of the 8000 exiles in volume 66 of the Perry-Rhodan series, while in the nechst issue Clark Darlton tells about the MICROTECHNICIANS of the Swaft-System, who first made the ROBOT-SPY possible.


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided four interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Blue Dwarfs. (Which was a lesson to me, because I have long thought that the plural of "dwarf" was "dwarves." Blame Tolkien for that.) The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Helen Urban and Matt Graham, and P. Schuyler Miller's chapter of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

80swynn
Edited: Sep 1, 7:45pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 63: Die Mikro-Techniker (= The Microtechnicians) / Clark Darlton
Tagline: A space armada hunting for criminals -- 20,000 Swoon are kidnapped ...
Date: November 16, 1962

The story so far:
The men of the DRUSUS actually have every reason to be disgusted with the conduct of the Robot Regent of Arkon, who smuggled a spy into the ship in order to learn the secret galactic position of Earth.
But Perry Rhodan knows very well that the robot ruler could not behave otherwise, in spite of its alliance with the Terrans.
The regent can never be a true friend to humans, for its programming probably prescribes that in any unsolvable situation at first to give up, and then at every opportunity to try immediately to outwit its allies.
The only remedy would be a new programming of the mammoth-robot.
But to undertake such a reprograming of the leader of the Arkonide Empire -- at this moment the Terrans are hardly in a position to do that.
Besides, Jost Kulman's report over THE MICROTECHNICIANS suggests that the Robot Regent has already begun another project to reach his goal ...


In episode 61 Rhodan and his team on the DRUSUS retrieved agent Jost Kuman from the planet Swoofon. After some suspense tracking down a robot spy, Kulman is now able to give his report, and the news is discouraging.

The Swoon are pickle-bodied natives of Swoofon. They have extremely acute vision and manual dexterity, and are ideal microtechnicians. The Swoon have recently accepted a commission from the Springers to build a new device, the compensator-direction-finder, which will circumvent the Terrans' structural compensators, which prevent the Arkonides from tracking Terran ships. Unless the Terrans can rapidly develop a way to thwart the compensator-direction-finder -- yeah, a countermeasure to a countermeasure to a countermeasure -- then Arkon will find Earth and Rhodan's vision is over.

Perry Rhodan, of course, hatches a plan. The DRUSUS returns to Swoofon and the crew pretends to be an Arkonide posse tracking down a fugitive criminal. Rhodan, pretending to be an Arkonide inspector, orders the closure of all spaceports to buy time for the crew to (1) locate the factory where the compensator-direction-finder is being produced, (2) steal plans for the new device, (3) analyze its design to invent a countermeasure, and (4) make enough friends among the Swoon to convince them to build the countermeasure.

Shouldn't take more than a few hours, really ...

Teaser for the next adventure:
The 20,000 Swoon scientists have agreed with little trouble to leave their home and work for the Terrans, so to speak, as foreign guest workers.
The products of the microtechnicians may prove themselves extraordinarily useful in the future for Perry Rhodan's cosmic agents!
Apart from that the Swoon should be able to build a compensator-direction-finder, so that the solar spaceships can continue to escape detection by Arkon.
But there remains the sinister foe from the other dimension, and the threat from this foe must be effectively opposed!
Six Terrans who try, land in TIME-CAPTIVITY ...


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Micro-Techs. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by J. Harvey Haggard and Christopher Smith, and L.A. Eshbach's chapter of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

The Ace edition has the tagline: "The series critics pan twice a month and readers love 24 times a year!"

81swynn
Edited: Sep 1, 7:49pm Top

GERMAN NERDERY:

A curious German idiomatic exchange from episode 63:

"... Die bauen einen Kompensatorpeiler, mit dem man Hypersprünge orten kann, auch wenn der Kompensator eingeschaltet ist."

"Ach, du heiliger Strohsack!" sagte Sikerman.

Bully grinste.

"Keine Sorge, wir werden ihnen die Suppe versalzen."


Literally:

"... They are building a compensator-direction-finder, with which they can locate hyperjumps, even when the compensator is turned on."

"Oh you holy straw mattress!" said Sikerman.

Bully grinned.

"No worries, we will oversalt their soup."


82MickyFine
Aug 29, 11:30am Top

>81 swynn: Those are delightful!

83swynn
Aug 29, 6:58pm Top

>82 MickyFine: Aren't they though? One of the fun things with odd foreign idioms is that, as you think of how they might be translated, you also notice how odd your own language's idioms are.

I mean, is "Holy mackerel!" any odder than "Holy straw mattress!"?

And "We'll oversalt their soup" makes at least as much sense as "We'll rain on their parade" ... or, as my mother used to say, "We'll fix their little red wagon."

84swynn
Edited: Sep 1, 7:44pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 64: Im Zeit-Gefängnis (= In Time-Prison) / Clark Darlton
Tagline: And a thousand years are as a day! -- Six Terrans in a strange dimension
Date: November 23, 1962

The story so far:
Lieutenant Marcel Rous of the DRUSUS, who has already collected valuable, albeit extremely disagreeable, experiences in the Mirsal star system through several encounters with the uncanny opponents from another dimension, receives orders from Perry Rhodan to monitor, with a small task force, an Arkonide colony world.
This world, called Tats-Tor by its inhabitants, is the second planet of the sun Morag -- and according to Perry Rhodan's positronic calculations Tats-Tor has a high probability of being the next target of the uncanny force.
Perry Rhodan's men want to warn the planet's inhabitants, and together with the planetary authorities develop possibilities for defense -- but they find themselves thrown into TIME-PRISON ...


Back in episode 59, Marcel Rous and Fellmer Lloyd invented the lens field generator (LFG), which allows transportation between our "Einstein Universe" and the slow-time "Red Universe," origin of the mass-disappearance attacks. Leading a team of six, Rous and Lloyd go to Tats-Tor, a commercial hub of the Arkonide Empire and likely target for the next disappearance. But the team arrives only to learn that disappearances have already begun. They contact the local authorities to offer help, but instead they are themselves suspected of causing the disappearances.

When the disappearences strike the capital city, Rous's team uses the LFG to break through into the Red Universe, where they find themselves stranded. Thanks to the LFG the team has its own Einstein-Universe time-bubble so they can move around freely while their surroundings move at glacial speed. They explore and experiment and discover that they have to be careful about, say, colliding with flying insects who happen to be practically frozen in midair. They also encounter caterpillar-like creatures, whose distorted communications sound like "... ruuuf ... druuuuuf ..." Later, the Terrans will start calling their Red-Universe enemy "Druuf," never mind that the beings they'll eventually call the Druuf aren't the caterpillar-things but something else entirely.

Since we have the name I'll stop saying "mysterious enemy" and "uncanny foe" and say instead that there's a crew of Druuf nearby who somehow notice that Rous's team has invaded their dimension. It's a puzzle to me how the Druuf do this when they're moving 72,000 times slower than the Terrans, but it has something to do with the prisoners they've just kidnapped from Tats-Tor and their temporal inertia. I confess I do not follow the logic of this adventure: there's a lot of time/dimensional bafflegab that my middling German can't crack.

By further bafflegab the crew discover that when they they accelerate the caterpillar-creatures to local lightspeed they somehow bring the caterpillars into the Einstein-Universe time-bubble. This is easier than it sounds, beacuse Red-Universe lightspeed is easily achievable by Einstein-Universe jetpacks. The lightspeed trick comes in handy when they discover a Terran ship that disappeared back in episode 58 in the events on Mirsal III. Rous's team accelerates the crew and communications equipment to Einstein-Universe time then sends a call to Perry Rhodan. But will he answer in time?

Teaser for the next adventure:

Can humans move faster than light even without using spaceships for transportation ... ?
Normally of course such a thing could not happen, but in the world of the Druuf the usual relationships do not rule -- at least not for beings who are not subject to the other dimension's slow time.
The six Terran invaders are so fast, thanks to having retained their characteristic time, that they can even dodge energy beams that approach with lightspeed.
And yet these men see no possibility for leaving slow-motion planet under their own power.
The exciting events of the TIME-EXPEDITION with Lieutenant Rous and his men form the core of the next Perry Rhodan novel.


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Prisoner of Time. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Sam Moskowitz and Gary Barber, and L.A. Eshbach's second chapter of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

The tagline on the Ace edition might as well be in a foreign language: "Golden Age Type Scientifiction Scintillates Again in Space Series#1!

85swynn
Edited: Sep 1, 7:43pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 65: Ein Hauch Ewigkeit (= A Breath of Eternity) / Clark Darlton
Tagline: A spaceship breaks through the time-wall -- and the Druuf send their servants out ...
Date: November 30, 1962

The story so far:
Can humans move faster than light even without using spaceships for transportation ... ?
In the "normal" universe of course this would be impossible, but on the planet Morag II, stolen by the Druufs, the normal rules no longer apply -- at least not for beings not subject to the other dimension's slow time.
The members of the six-person time-expedition under Lieutenant Marcel Rous, thanks to retaining their characteristic time, are so fast, that they can even dodge energy beams that approach with relative lightspeed! So who can harm them?
And yet, the members of the time-expedition are discouraged! They invaded the strange dimension by means of the lens field generator -- but now that the "window" into their own universe has disappeared they have become prisoners of time and space.


Months after the attack that brought Rous's team into the Red Universe, Perry Rhodan arrives on Tats-Tor. By this time the overlap-zone between the two universes has rolled on, and Rhodan's lens field generator can no longer break through. He spends a couple more months inventing a new version that can open an even larger window. In the space ship SAMBO, equipped with the enhanced LFG, Perry Rhodan enters the slow-time universe, but barely has time to retrieve Marcel Rous's team when his ship is attacked by the druuf. Gucky and Ras Tchubai teleport to the attacking ship, where they seek out the control room and manage to crash the ship. The plan worked so successfully that they jump away to the remaining attacking ships, where adventure ensues.

If the last adventure's rules about time-relations were confusing, the rules in this one are impenetrable. I *think* that the Druuf are able to attack Rhodan's ship so effectively because their ships are time-accelerated craft steered by time-accelerated robots. So the Druuf are speeding up, but also Rhodan is slowing down. It's not clear to me why -- it has something to do with lightspeed -- but the Terrans somehow become naturalized to the local time, which means that it's anybody's guess how many years will have passed by the time they return to Einstein-Universe. In the end it doesn't matter though, because during the final battle the Terrans' fictive transmitter causes a time explosion or something, which not only hurls them out of the Red Universe but also back in time to two short minutes after Rhodan left.

Teaser for the next adventure:

Was it only a lucky break that the Administrator of the Solar Empire protected himself from sinking into the "Sea of Time"?
Or was it fate that allowed the dimension-invading SAMBO and her crew to regain their normal characteristic time ... ?
As that may be -- in any case all who spent time in the Druuf plane feel a BREATH OF ETERNITY!
The next Perry-Rhodan-novel was written by Kurt Mahr and carries the title, WATCHERS OF THE BANNED.
This novel is dedicated to the further fate of the 8000 Terrans on the planet Gray Beast.


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as A Touch of Eternity. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by R. Michael Rosen and Raymond James Jones, and Eando Binder's chapter of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

86lyzard
Edited: Aug 31, 6:28pm Top

Ahh, technobabble! - where would SF writers be without it? :)

SAMBO??

Please tell me that's just an unfortunate acronym? I've had quite enough of that nonsense recently, thank you, Margaret Mitchell!

87swynn
Edited: Aug 31, 11:48pm Top

>86 lyzard: Ditto on SAMBO. No, if it's an acronym it's not identified as such. Nor is it a term with some innocuous meaning in German, and anyway it's typical for the spaceships to be given English names. It's also not unusual for the authors to borrow names or terms without appreciating cultural nuances or baggage .... but Helen Bannerman's book had several German translations and adaptations, and that's almost certainly where Clark Darlton borrowed it.

I offer no defense for it. I do observe that according to the Perrypedia we've seen the last of it.

I have no idea whether the ship was rechristened for the English translation, but am curious.

88swynn
Edited: Sep 1, 7:42pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 66: Wächter der Verbannten (= Guardian of the Exiles) / Kurt Mahr
Tagline: The Peepsies' deadly mistake: Terrans are no slaves -- The third colonist-adventure! ...
Date: December 7, 1962

The story so far:
On Gray Beast, a planet far from the interstellar trade routes, there live 8000 exiles from Earth.
They have begun to settle in to their new world, and have made some progress. In the mountains there are the Mungos, a half-intelligent race of apelike-beings, and the lowland jungle is home to the strange Blue Dwarfs, endowed with astounding paramechanical and parapsychic powers.
The president of the 8000 settlers, who have adopted a democratic constitution, is Horace O. Mullon. His opponent, how will stop at nothing to stop Mullon, is W.S Hollander.
Hollander has managed to usurp the power in the small settler-city Greenwich while Mullon was ranging the jungles with a small research expedition. Hollander believes Mullon is dead -- shot by a traitor!
But Mullon lives, thanks to the mysterious medical arts of the Blue Dwarfs. He knows what has happened in Greenwich, and has returned to the Blue Dwarfs to warn them about Hollander and to seek protection from them. Accompanying him are Fraudy his wife, and Milligan, once a crewman on the spaceship that brought the settlers to Gray Beast and there made a crash landing.
But recently they have been joined by a mysterious young man: Chellish, the GUARDIAN OF THE EXILES ...


With the help of the Blue Dwarfs, Horace Mullon devises a trap to overcome Hollander's defenses. Mullon immediately reestablishes democracy. The surviving settlers vote on Hollander's fate, and after some debate about the morality of capital punishment, execute him.

A few weeks later the colony has returned to peace and everyday routine, when a space ship arrives with a military force of "Peepsies." The Peepsies quickly subdue Greenwich and force the settlers to work at planting crops. With the new master-slave relationship established, most of the Peepsies depart, leaving an occupation force of 200 behind. It doesn't take long for the occupying force to grow discontented and inattentive. This gives Mullon opportunity to organize a few trusted friends to plan a revolt. The revolt succeeds, but Mullon knows that its success can only be temporary unless they improvise a plan for meeting the space ship when it returns again. An atomic bomb should do the trick ...

Teaser for the next adventure:

Captain Blailey, commander of the long-range reconnaissance craft landed on Gray Beast, has received strict orders from Perry Rhodan to intervene only when clear danger threatens the settlers.
So the settlers had to rely on their own resources against the Peepsies who appeared, so to say, out of the clear blue sky.
But what will happen when something like an entire space armada of the interplanetary neighbors should appear...?
The Terran colonists' clever counterattack will be narrated in Perry Rhodan volume 72 (also by Kurt Mahr), while in the next novel Kurt Brand tells about a problem that is Rhodan's and Thora's most personal business -- and that of Thomas Cardif, the son of two worlds!


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided five interior illustrations for the original edition. You can see them all at the (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as The Guardians. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by Andrei Gorbovskii, and Eando Binder's second chapter of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

89swynn
Edited: Sep 14, 9:47pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 67: Zwischenspiel auf Siliko V (= Interlude on Siliko V) / Kurt Brand
Tagline: He is the son of two worlds -- only five people know the secret of his origin ...
Date: December 14, 1962

The story so far:
On Earth it is October 2041. In the Space Academy of Terrania a new class of cadets of the Solar Space Fleet have put their final examinations behind them, some with more success than others. One of the cadets, taken immediately immediately for active space duty, is Thomas Cardif.
Thomas Cardif is the son of two worlds -- and only five people now the secret of his origin: Perry Rhodan, Thora, Crest, Reginald Bull, and Julian Tifflor.
Thomas Cardiff is a son of Terra and Arkon both!
Until now the secret has been kept -- but an INTERLUDE ON SILIKO V shows that Thomas's parents, guided by cosmo-political considerations, have committed a grave mistake ...


We've seen plenty of evidence that Perry Rhodan is an asshole; this adventure tells how he's a crap parent too.

Between episodes 49 and 50 there was a gap of 56 years during which Perry and Thora married. (For casual readers, Thora was commander of the Arkonide research vessel that was stranded on the moon back in Episode 1 which started this whole story.) It now turns out that Perry and Thora also have a son. The boy hasn't been mentioned before because Perry and Thora didn't raise him. Because get this: before the boy was born Perry consulted a positronic brain for advice, which told them that the boy would be charismatic and intelligent and overweeningly proud (overweeningly proud like his mother, everybody keeps saying, but really: who was it set himself up as the leader over all of everybody and decided to take over the universe? Trying to remember ...) Anyway, the advice is that if the boy grew up as son to the most powerful couple in the galaxy, his pride and cruelty would dominate his personality; on the other hand, if he were given a humble birth and were made to work his way up to respectability then his determination and intelligence would have room to grow. So for the good of the child, Perry and Thora gave him up jto foster care.

Now Thomas Cardif is all grown up and graduating with honor at the Space Academy. And *now* Thora wants to be a part of his life, convinced that the last 21 years have all been a huge mistake, so she flies to the Space Academy where she hopes to watch the ceremony and maybe even meet her long-lost-son. But then she is kidnapped by Springers and taken to Siliko V. There follows a wide-ranging search, robot battles, and the requisite big showdown where Perry, Thora, Thomas all meet and secrets are revealed. It does not end well. In fact, Perry finishes the adventure with a brand-new enemy. Somehow Thomas resents having grown up without the love of parents for no better reason than their worry that he might be a bad kid.

It's hard not to take Thomas's side. In fact, why bother? Perry Rhodan is such an asshole.

Teaser for the next adventure:

Yes, it was a grave mistake for Perry Rhodan and Thora to leave their son ignorant of his origin -- for now that Thomas Cardif has accidentally learned the secret anyway, what has happened is exactly what the parents had hoped to prevent with all their deception!
But the Administrator of the Solar Empire has still other grave worries, for the HUNT THROUGH THE DIMENSIONS looms!


The cover is by Johnny Bruck. Bruck also provided interior illustrations for the original edition. Unfortunately, from this adventure forward the interior illustrations aren't posted on Perrypedia. Still, there is a (German-language) Perrypedia webpage for the Heftroman.

This adventure was translated into English as Interlude on Siliko 5. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with Edmund Hamilton's chapter of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

90swynn
Sep 14, 3:44pm Top

>86 lyzard: Re: SAMBO. I visited a used bookstore earlier today that happened to have a copy of A Breath of Eternity, the English translation of Episode 65. The spaceship's name was "Sherbourne." Good choice.

91swynn
Sep 14, 10:53pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 68: Hetzjagd durch die Dimensionen (= Hunt Through the Dimensions) / Kurt Mahr
Tagline: Planet WANDERER has disappeared. -- Must the immortals die ...?
Date: December 21, 1962

The story so far:
The year 2042 is a decisive date for both leading men of the Solar Empire!
It is the year when Perry Rhodan and Reginald Bull must get a second cell shower, no matter what, unless they want to come to a miserable end within a few days.
In 1976 the two men were treated in the physiotron of the artificial world Wanderer, with the requirement to return again in no more than 62 Earth years. Reckoning with the time-dilation the Terrans underwent while returning to their home solar system from the World of Immortals, yields the date of May 1, 20142 as the deadline for a life-extending cell shower.
Since the elliptical path that the Planet of Immortality describes through the universe has been calculated exactly, and since the later cell showers of of other deserving people have gone without complications, Perry Rhodan had no reason to set out early for Wanderer.
But now he must undertake the HUNT THROUGH THE DIMENSIONS, for the source of eternal life seems to have disappeared ...


It's time for Perry and Bully to renew their immortality treatment on the planet Wanderer. But Wanderer is gone. They discover that a front exists nearby where the Einstein Universe and the Red Universe overlap. Further investigation convinces them that Wanderer's orbit has led it into the Druufs' universe. Rhodan's team crosses into the Red Universe and land on a nearby planet. The slow-time weirdness continues: local time here seems to be running 72 times more slowly than the Einstein-Universe.

The crew begins to see hallucinations of a human-like figure suddenly appearing and disappearing on the planet's surface. Investigating the apparitions, they discover a collection of underground tunnels, each of which ends in a room containing six coffin-like boxes. The boxes are rigged to explode upon tampering, which they discover too late in the first tunnel -- fortunately, with time running so slowly they can outrun the explosion.

In the second tunnel, they dismantle the explosives, and open the boxes to discover six parts of some alien creature. When they empty the boxes, the six pieces reintegrate into a single being, who explains that it and its companions are telepathic beings from the planet Solitude. The Solitude-creatures can survive temporary dismemberment, so the Druuf cut them into six pieces and lock the pieces into boxes to use them as sentinels at the universe's edge.

As an early-warning system the strategy seems to work, because a strike force of Druuf robots soon arrive on the planet. Mayhem ensues. When the dust clears, Rhodan's team is able to extract data confirming that Wanderer passed through the Red Universe, but seems to have passed out again.

Teaser for the next adventure:

The HUNT THROUGH THE DIMENSIONS has achieved an initial success, but the source of immortality is not yet achieved!
To search for Wanderer, the men of the DRUSUS must enter the half-space.
Their experiences are portrayed once again by Kurt Mahr in the next Perry-Rhodan-novel.


The cover is by Johnny Bruck, who also provided some interior illustrations.

The (German-language) Perrypedia webpage is here.

This adventure was translated into English as Dimension Search. The first edition was published by Ace in 1974 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by Dan'l Danehy-Oakes and the final chapter of "Cosmos", a story written by 18 different science fiction authors.

92swynn
Edited: Sep 15, 7:36pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 69: Im Halbraum lauert der Tod (= Death Lurks in Half-Space) / Kurt Mahr
Tagline: They have become giants -- on a planet that lies in half-space
Date: December 28, 1962

The story so far:

The year 2042 is a decisive date for both leading men of the Solar Empire!
It is the year when Perry Rhodan and Reginald Bull must get a second cell shower, no matter what, unless they want to come to a miserable end within a few days.
In 1976 the two men were treated in the physiotron of the artificial world Wanderer, with the requirement to return again in no more than 62 Earth years. Reckoning with the time-dilation the Terrans underwent while returning to their home solar system from the World of Immortals, yields the date of May 1, 20142 as the deadline for a life-extending cell shower.
Since the elliptical path that the Planet of Immortality describes through the universe has been calculated exactly, and since the later cell showers of of other deserving people have gone without complications, Perry Rhodan had no reason to set out early for Wanderer.
Already the "hunt through the dimensions" has shown how mistaken this assumption was.
To reach Wanderer now at the correct location, they must press into "half-space," the unstable space between the fourth and fifth dimensions -- but DEATH LURKS IN HALF-SPACE ...


Using data extracted last episode from a robot brain, Rhodan's team calculated that planet Wanderer's trajectory has taken it through the Red Universe and back into the Einstein Universe. But when they fly to the expected coordinates Wanderer still has not appeared. Through a series of experiments and calculations they conclude that Wanderer is stuck between dimensions.

The team comes up with two possible strategies for reaching Wanderer, and attempts both. Reginald Bull and Mike Tompetch approach Wanderer via spacecraft through a dimensional window, while Perry Rhodan uses the fictive transmitter to jump to Wanderer directly. Bully and Tompetch arrive as planned, but have to make an emergency landing when their ship's power mysteriously drains. They also experience some weird dimensional distortion, with kilometers compressed to meters in some directions. Rhodan, Atlan and John Marshall arrive in a craft sent via fictive transmitter. They too find their power drained. Perry meets It, who explains that It is exhausted from passing through the Red Universe, and is soaking up energy to recover.

Time is running out to reach the physiotron, where Perry and Bully must get the cell-shower. Bully takes advantage of the dimensional distortion to cross hundreds of kilometers with just a few steps. He finds the planet's generator bank and gets them running again. This restores power to the planet and to Rhodan's craft so that Rhodan too can reach the physiotron.

Teaser for the next adventure:

They became giants and caused massive storms, as they crossed an entire ocean with a single step!
Then their bodies normalized again, and after Perry Rhodan Bully can also enter the physiotron.
But a strange effect appears and Gucky begins to tremble for his friend's life. Atlan the Arkonide's photographic memory forces a ten-thousand-year flashback to THE LAST DAYS OF ATLANTIS ...
THE LAST DAYS OF ATLANTIS -- that is a new pinnacle of the Perry-Rhodan series!


The cover is by Johnny Bruck, who also provided some interior illustrations.

The (German-language) Perrypedia webpage is here.

This adventure was translated into English as Death Waits in Semispace. The first edition was published by Ace in 1975 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by King Akers and the first chapter of a new serial: "New Lensman", an authorized expansion of E. E. Smith's Lensman series.

93swynn
Edited: Oct 3, 11:20pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 70: Die letzten Tage von Atlantis (= The Last Days of Atlantis) / K. H. Scheer
Tagline: Arkon-ship TOSOMA in final battle: the crew arrests their admiral! -- The fourth Atlan-adventure!
Date: January 4, 1963

The story so far:

Atlan, the ancient and yet physically and mentally young and fresh Arkonide, was there.
He was there, as the super battleship DRUSUS under Perry Rhodan's command after a long and discouraging search finally landed on Wanderer, the artificial planet that contained the source of immortality.
Even without the interention of the mysterious collective intelligence called "He" or "It" the Terrans managed to put the life-extending cell shower into operation.
Perry Rhodan had priority for the life-extending procedure!
Following him was Reginald Bull, Rhodan's oldest friend and partner -- but now appears an effect that makes Gucky shudder for Bully's life, and forces Atlan to a ten-thousand-year flashback to THE LAST DAYS OF ATLANTIS ...


The youth-extending "cell shower" treatment goes as planned for Perry Rhodan, but while Reginald Bull's treatment is interrupted by a hyperspace disturbance. Instead of extending Bull's current health by 62 more years, the process causes him to grow younger ... and will take him to infancy if it is not stopped. For technobabbley reasons the team thinks repeating the procedure in the Red Universe will fix the problem so they dismantle the physiotron and carry it into Druuf-space.

Meanwhile, Atlan flashes back ten thousand years to events following the flashback in episode 60. Following the Druuf attack on Venus, Atlan is down to just two battleships and a handful of smaller ships. Most of the adventure follows Atlan's losing battle against the Druuf. Finally, Atlan's own men strand him on Earth where he can be sheltered in his undersea dome and have some hope of survival. He is the only Arkonide settler to survive.

Teaser for the next adventure:

Once again, thanks to Atlan's vivid storytelling, a chapter of Earth's early history is brought from the darkness of mythology into the light: the last days of Atlantis!
Perry Rhodan volume 71 concerns itself with a completely different problem, that is nevertheless just as urgent as an attack from another dimension. Can the Robot Regent of Arkon already determine Earth's coordinates or not ...?
Major Clyde Ostal and 32 men of the Solar Secret Service are sent out to determine that very thing -- and that's how it comes to a MISJUMP OF THE TIGRIS!


The cover is by Johnny Bruck, who also provided some interior illustrations.

The (German-language) Perrypedia webpage is here.

This adventure was translated into English as The Last Days of Atlantis. The first edition was published by Ace in 1975 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short stories by Dale Hammell and Barnaby Rapoport, and chapter 2 of William B. Ellern's "New Lensman."

94swynn
Edited: Oct 18, 2:57pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 71: Fehlsprung der TIGRIS (= Mis-jump of the TIGRIS) / Kurt Brand
Tagline: 32 men of the Solar Defense Service on a special mission against the Robot Regent!
Date: January 11, 1963

The story so far:

Clyde Ostal, a tested officer of the Solar Defense Service, receives in June 2042 the assignment from Perry Rhodan, to take over the armed freighter TIGRIS.
Clyde Ostal and 32 members of the Solar Defense Service who have been screen a hundred ways, are to start from the Earth into space with the special mission to determine whether Robot Regent of Arken is already in a position to measure the characteristic frequencies of structural compensators and thereby determine the location of transiting spaceships.
But before Major Ostal takes off, the machines of his ship and the memory banks of the onboard positronic computers are prepared for a MIS-JUMP OF THE TIGRIS, all according to plan ...


Earth has so far remained safe from Arkonide attacks for the simple reason that Arkon doesn't know Earth's location. Terran ships are outfitted with "structural compensators," which make it impossible to track the ships through a hyperspace jump. But recently (Episode 63), Perry Rhodan and his team learned that the Arkonides have hired the microtechnicians of Swoofon to develop a compensator-direction-finder, which would be able to track even those ships with structural compensators. The Terrans have developed a countermeasure, the characteristic-vibration-damper but it's taking time to get all the Terran ships upgraded. Rhodan wants to know whether he's already run out of time: are Arkonide ships already equipped with the compensator-direction-finders?

Being Perry Rhodan, he hatches an elaborate scheme to find out.

The scheme involves an undercover team of agents masquerading as merchants, who will execute several jumps ending in Arkon's Naral System, watching to see whether the Arkonides can track them. But since no Terran merchant would go to Naral on purpose, the TIGRIS's navigation computers are precisely sabotaged to make it look like the Naral jump is a technical failure. Of course the TIGRIS also carries false coordinates for Earth's location as well. Rhodan himself takes the LOTUS to the edge of the Naral System, to lead the extraction when the TIGRIS crew finish their mission.

The TIGRIS's failed jump is successful, and the ship is indeed tracked despite its structural compensator. Its crew is detained and Arkonide forces examine the ship's computer, all according to plan. Excitement ensues as the TIGRIS's crew find their way back off planet.

Teaser for the next adventure:

Again it is Perry Rhodan who in his old familiar freshness has not only filled the post of Solar Administrator for decades, but is extremely active in personally engaging in the happenings in space.
In any case Perry Rhodan has won another small victory against the Robot Regent but the big question -- how long can his luck hold out? -- becomes ever more acute ....
And the events on Gray Beast, the planet of exiles, relentlessly approach their dangerous climax!
You can read more about that in THE EMISSARIES OF AURIGEL by Kurt Mahr ...


The cover is by Johnny Bruck, who also provided some interior illustrations.

The (German-language) Perrypedia webpage is here.

This adventure was translated into English as The Tigris Leaps. The first edition was published by Ace in 1975 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with a short story by Walt Liebscher, and chapter 3 of William B. Ellern's "New Lensman."

95swynn
Edited: Oct 18, 11:18pm Top

 

Perry Rhodan 72: Die Gesandten von Aurigel (= The Emissaries from Aurigel) / Kurt Mahr
Tagline: FAIR LADY reveals her origins -- the fourth colonist-adventure!
Date: January 18, 1963

The story so far:

On Gray Beast, the seventh planet of the Myrtha System, far from the routes of interstellar space travel, there live 8,000 exiles from Earth.
They have begun to build on their new world, and achieved progress. They have established that their new home does not belong to them alone. In the mountains there are the Mungos, a half-intelligent race of apes, and in the lowland jungle there live the strange Blue Dwarves, who have astounding paramechanical and parapsychological powers.
But the System's twelfth planet also carries intelligent life: the so-called Peepsies, whose recent invasion very nearly called the further existence of the Terran colony into question.
With help from the repaired spacecraft FAIR LADY, the colony's leaders decide to pay the Peepsies a visit, in order to nip in the bud any further plans for invasion by the residents of the 12th planet.
The Terrans appear as THE EMISSARIES FROM AURIGEL -- though their intentions have a surprising outcome ...


Back in Episode 66, the Terran colony on Gray Beast was invaded by the Peepsies, who put the colonists to work as slave labor. The plucky colonists staged a revolt, and successfully overthrew the Peepsies on planet. Problem is, more Peepsies will show up eventually and with overwhelming force. If the Terrans want long-term freedom they have to come up with a plan. Fortunately, plans are what Terrans do.

The FAIR LADY is the ship of Gunter Chellish, a Terran agent sent to Gray Beast to keep an eye on the colonists. Chellish is part of the team now, and organizes a voyage to the Peepsies' world. Team members will pretend to be from the (imaginary) world Aurigel, four light-years from the Myrtha System, and in possession of military powers far greater than the Peepsies'. The team knows that some high-ranking Peepsies may have heard the colonists speaking English on Gray Beast, so they agree that the language of Aurigel will be French.

Things go well initially when Chellish's team arrives on the twelfth planet, but some Peepsies are suspicious. Eventually the ruse is exposed when linguistic analysis reveals that the script "FAIR LADY" on the "Aurigelian" ship is actually in the language of the colonists and not that of "Aurigel" -- if such a place even exists, that is. Chellish's cover is blown and thrills follow.

It turns out, though, that the Gray Beast colonists really *do* have a superior military might on their side when a Terran battleship unexpectedly appears.

Teaser for the next adventure:

The Planet Gray Beast and the entire Myrtha-System have, practically overnight, taken on the greatest importance, and mathematical calculations show that this system will overlap the Druufs' time-plane in approximately 10 months.
Perry Rhodan develops a plan to invade the other dimension with strong forces, beginning from Gray Beast.
But his ambitious plan has a few holes, as shown in THE THREE DESERTERS ...


The cover is by Johnny Bruck, who also provided some interior illustrations.

The (German-language) Perrypedia webpage is here.

This adventure was translated into English as The Ambassadors from Aurigel. The first edition was published by Ace in 1975 with a cover by Gray Morrow, together with short stories by Donald Franson and Larry Carmody, and chapter 4 of William B. Ellern's "New Lensman."

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