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What Are We Reading and Reviewing in June?

Mystery and Suspense

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1Carol420
May 24, 9:57am Top

This is the place to let everyone know the books you are reading this month, and then to leave reviews of these books. You can put up a list of the books you are reading for the month or put a post about a book as you start it, or even both.

A review can be something as simple as a sentence about the book or as comprehensive as you want to make it - whatever is good for you. Our love of books is the reason we are all here.

2Carol420
Edited: Jun 16, 4:35pm Top

Carol's June Reads
✔ 6//18 -★

Group Reads:
Piranha by Clive Cussler - 6/5/18 - 4★
The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths - 6//18 -★

Blind Date With A Book;
The Hanover Square Affair by Ashley Gardner - 6/10/18 - 4★

Others:
Silent Witness by Richard North Patterson - 6/14/18 - 4.5★
The Fallen by David Baldacci - 6/9/18 - 4.5★
Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin - 6/14/18 -4★
Collecting The Dead by Spencer Kope - 6//18 -★
Perish by Lisa Black - 6//18 -★
The Outsider by Stephen King - 6/5/18 - 5★
Twisted Prey by John Sandford - 6//18 -★
The She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell -6//18 -★
Broken Harbor by Tana French - 6//18 -★
American Fire by Monica Hesse- 6/5/18 -4★
The Green Book by Jill Paton Walsh - 6//18 -★
The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware - 6/12/18 - 4★
The Broken Girls by Simone St. James - 6//18 -★

3EadieB
Edited: Yesterday, 7:32am Top

June 2018
✔ ★ ☞ ☊

Currently Reading
"...And Ladies of the Club"by Helen Hooven Santmyer - 1,176 pgs.
☞ ☊The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King - 400 pgs.
☞The Guilty Dead by P.J. Tracy - 336 pgs.
☞☊Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery - 320 pgs.
The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths (#9 in the Ruth Galloway Series)
Last Seen Alive by Claire Douglas - 336 pgs.

Finished Reading June 2018
✔☊Gilead by Marilynne Robinson - 282 pgs. - ★★★ - 6/1/2018
Sovereign by C. J. Sansom - 584 pgs. - ★★★★★ - 6/2/2018
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones - 320 pgs. - ★★★ - 6/5/2018
✔☊A Separate Peace by John Knowles - 204 pgs. - ★★★★ - 6/6/2018
✔☊Piranha by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison - 422 pgs. - ★★★★ - 6/6/2018
✔☊The Outsider by Stephen King - 576 pgs. - ★★ - 6/11/2018
A Gathering of Secrets by Linda Castillo - 308 pgs. - ★★★★★ - 6/12/2018
✔☊Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison - 581 pgs. - ★★★★ - 6/12/2018
✔☊Where the Red Ferns Grow by Wilson Rawls - 272 pgs. - ★★★★★ - 6/14/2018
✔☊The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan - 288 pgs. - ★★★★★ - 6/14/2018
The Guilty Dead by P.J. Tracy - 336 pgs. - ★★★★★ - 6/18/2018

June 2018 - Group Reads
Mystery and Suspense Group Winner : TBD

Buddy Reads

Other Reads
The Book of Spies by Gayle Lynds - 390 pgs.
He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly - 392 pgs.
Us Against You by Fredrik Backman - 435 pgs.

Early Reviewer
Day of the Dead by Nicci French - 416 pgs.

The Great American Read
Watchers by Dean R. Koontz - 483 pgs.
The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger - 214 pgs.

1001 Books To Read Before You Die
The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach - 512 pgs.
Far From The Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy - 480 pgs.
The Lost Language of Cranes by David Leavitt - 319 pgs.

4Olivermagnus
Edited: May 26, 8:41pm Top

Lynda and Oliver's June Reading Plan

Blood Safari - Deon Meyer
Book of Speculation - Erika Swyoer
Chalk Pit - Elly Griffiths
Come Sundown - Nora Roberts
Dead If You Don't - Peter James
Dying Truth - Angela Marsons
Enchanted Castle - Marc Secchia
Girl in the Red Coat - Kate Hamer
Identicals - Erin Hildebrand
Mother Night - Kurt Vonnegut
Nightfall Over Shanghai - Daniel Kalla
Out of the Sun - Robert Goddard
Piranha - Oregon Files - Clive Cussler
Reign of the Marionettes - Sheena Macleod

5Andrew-theQM
May 27, 6:09pm Top

Unfortunately not able to do the Group Read of Why Mermaids Sing by C S Harris. None of the libraries have it, not available as an e-book and has had to be ordered from the US. Also still not been able to get hold of Walking By Night - people who have the two copies still haven’t returned them to the library! 😡

I suggest we advance the next two Group Reads for June with the following schedule :

1. Piranha by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison, #10 in the Oregon Files Series - start Friday 1st June

2. The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths, #9 in the Ruth Galloway Series - start date Friday 15th June

Then when I can get hold of the two outstanding group reads we will look to schedule them. Apologies for the delay on these!

6Andrew-theQM
May 27, 6:10pm Top

>4 Olivermagnus: Hoping to Read Dead if You Don’t this week.

7gaylebutz
May 29, 4:43pm Top

Gayle's June List

Impact by Douglas Preston - sub-genre: conspiracy
The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths - group read
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
Desert Lost by Betty Webb
Winter of the World by Ken Follett - I started this last month and am about halfway through - it's over 900 pages! But I am enjoying it and will continue on.

8Carol420
May 29, 5:31pm Top

>7 gaylebutz: I really liked The Woman in the Window. I'll be looking forward to your review.

9Olivermagnus
Edited: May 30, 8:53pm Top

>7 gaylebutz: - I just read Desert Noir by Betty Webb and thought it was a fun series so I'm planning to read the next one soon. I liked The Woman in the Window too and thought it was a great audio. I read the Century Trilogy in 2016 and Winter of the World was my favorite volume.

10Olivermagnus
Edited: May 30, 8:53pm Top

>2 Carol420: - I always look forward to the new Prey book. I read that and The Fallen in May and they were both good. I'm on the fence on Ms. Westaway. None of her books have grabbed me since In a Dark Dark Wood.

11Olivermagnus
Edited: May 30, 8:54pm Top

>3 EadieB: - I am a huge fan of Matthew Shardlake. I'm hoping Sansom has another one soon. Watchers is one of my very favorite book of "all times" and I've never recommended it to anyone who didn't love it. I may have to do a reread this year.

12Olivermagnus
May 30, 8:52pm Top

>6 Andrew-theQM: - I just got a notification from the library that my audio is ready so hopefully I can start it in the next couple of days. I can't wait to see what happens after the ominous ending of the last one.

13EadieB
May 31, 5:39am Top

>11 Olivermagnus: I am looking forward to Watchers and reading it for The Great American Read list. Did you see the pbs special where they are going to pick the book from the list in October that will be The Great American Read. You can also vote online for your favorites on the list.

I'm really enjoying Sovereign and Shardlake. It reads faster than the first two.

14Andrew-theQM
Edited: Jun 1, 5:34am Top

Schedule for the Group Read of Piranha by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison :

Friday 1st June : Prologue and Chapters 1 - 7
Saturday 2nd June : Chapters 8 - 19
Sunday 3rd June : Chapters 20 - 29
Monday 4th June : Chapters 30 - 38
Tuesday 5th June : Chapters 39 - 48 and Epilogue

15Andrew-theQM
Edited: Jun 1, 5:27am Top

Provisional Reads for June:

Group Reads
Piranha by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison
The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths

Other Reads
Sovereign by C J Sansom
Extreme Measures by Vince Flynn
The Dark Tower : The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King
The Sword Of God By John Milton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Alice Network by Kate Quinn
The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell
Doc by Mary Doria Russell
Broken Promise by Linwood Barclay
Now You See Me by S J Bolton
The Killing Room by Peter May
Dead Gone by Luca Veste
Hot Blood by Stephen Leather
The Fallen by David Baldacci
The Library Of Gold by Gayle Lynds
The Assassins by Gayle Lynds
The Visitor by Jane Goodall
The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty

16EadieB
Edited: Jun 3, 2:44pm Top


Gilead by Marilynne Robinson - 282 pgs. - ★★★
This is a story of three generation from Civil War to the 20th century. Basically a pastor father speaking to his son of the spiritual battles of the American life. Robinson is a gifted writer with beautiful lyrical prose about love and forgiveness. It's not a book that not everyone would love as it is a lot of religious philosophizing. It's not a book with a plot or a real storyline so if that's what you are looking for, this book is not for you. I found it enjoyable in some areas but a bit boring in others.

17EadieB
Edited: Jun 5, 8:06pm Top


Sovereign by C. J. Sansom - 583 pgs. - ★★★★★
This is the 3rd book of the Shardlake series and my favorite so far. King Henry VIII and his 5th wife, Catherine Howard progress from London to York. Shardlake and Barak are transporting a conspirator from York to London and come across a secret concerning the monarchy. Someone is attempting to kill Shardlake to protect the secret. This was a very hard to put down book with excellent plot, characters and intrigue. I would highly recommend this series to those who love to read about 16th century Tudor England.

18gaylebutz
Jun 4, 5:22pm Top

Why My Third Husband Will Be a Dog by Lisa Scottoline
3.5 ★

Lisa Scottoline is a mystery writer. She and her daughter also write a column for the Philadelphia Inquirer called Chick Wit. This book is a collection of those columns plus a few new ones. They are humorous and sometimes touching, covering quite a variety of everyday topics like wearing spanks, chicken farming and making unresolutions. This was a light and amusing book, read by the author and I enjoyed it.

19Carol420
Edited: Jun 5, 9:14am Top

>18 gaylebutz: LOL! I love the title! I know some people whose first and second husbands could have also fit the canine category...so she may not be the warm, cuddly, little guy she is expecting or hoping for:)

20Carol420
Jun 5, 9:51am Top



The Outsider by Stephen King
5 ★

An unspeakable crime. A confounding investigation. An eleven-year-old boy’s violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City’s most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad. As the investigation expands and horrifying answers begin to emerge.

Can someone be in two places at once? Before you say "no way", stop and think about the author that is trying to convince you of this. This is the man that presented us with nightmares about a killer clown that lives in the sewer (It), a disturbed young girls that used her powers to destroy an entire town and the people that tormented her (Carrie), that sometimes "dead is better'...a lesson that we learned as dead pets and eventually people returned, (Pet Sementary), various werewolves and vampires make appearances along his literary path...so this should not be too difficult for a Stephan King fan to buy into. Creepy and disturbing barely begin to describe "The Outsider. Once you start on this journey you won't be able to stop until you reach page 560..the end. Fans will also recognize and welcome back some of the characters from "The Mercedes Trilogy". I have to agree with the one reviewer that wrote "More than merely horror...this story will take you on an incredible ride through places you otherwise dare not go."

21EadieB
Edited: Jun 6, 9:40pm Top


An American Marriage by Tayari Jones - 320 pgs. - ★★★
I found the characters aggravating. Story is told in first person accounts and letters by Roy, Celestial and Andre. Roy is unjustly incarcerated. His wife, Celestial, spends time with Andre while Roy is away. A love triangle is formed when Roy is released. Roy was arrogant, Celestial was selfish and they never should have married. Why did Andre introduce Roy to Celestial if he was in love with her? Read and see how you feel about this book.

22Carol420
Jun 6, 10:58am Top


American Fire by Monica Hesse
4★

The arsons started on a cold November midnight and didn’t stop for months. Night after night, the people of Accomack County waited to see which building would burn down next, regarding each other at first with compassion, and later suspicion. Vigilante groups sprang up, patrolling the rural Virginia coast with cameras and camouflage. Volunteer firefighters slept at their stations. The arsonist seemed to target abandoned buildings, but local police were stretched too thin to survey them all. Accomack County, Virginia was desolate―there were hundreds of abandoned buildings. And by the dozen they were burning.

I liked this story much more than I thought I would when I picked the book up because it fit a category of a challenge. The story really isn't the fires as much as it's a story of a rural community that has fallen on drastically devastating hard times with irrational behavior thrown into the smoldering pot. The author does a fantastic job of presenting a vivid picture of the situation. A visit to Accomack County, Virginia is not necessary in order to picture what life had become there. You didn't have to met Charlie to know who he is. What could be a straightforward story about a series of fires in this rural area suddenly becomes a story about the very souls of the people that lived through it.

23EadieB
Edited: Jun 6, 9:48pm Top


A Separate Peace by John Knowles - 204 pgs. - ★★★★
A classic that young and old can relate to. Gene and Phineas attend a boarding school in New England during WWII and become friends. Gene betrays Phineas out of jealousy and rivalry. Years later Gene is still trying to forgive himself as he recognizes the evil of the dark side of adolescence and the consequences of his jealousy. Book teaches a lesson about how boys can become both rivals and intimate friends but need to be wary of each other.

24EadieB
Edited: Jun 11, 10:17am Top


Piranha by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison - 422 pgs. - ★★★★
Co-authored with Boyd Morrison which gave the book a different feeling. Lacked action and suspense in the beginning but picked up in the end. Love the Oregon crew members and the plot was good but I found the special telescope to be unbelievable. Looking forward to the next installment. These are fun adventure reads with great humor. Some history involved in the storylines.

25Carol420
Edited: Jun 7, 6:54am Top


Piranha by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison
Oregon Files series Book #10
4★

In 1902, the volcano Mt. Pelée erupts on the island of Martinique, wiping out an entire city of thirty thousand—and sinking a ship carrying a German scientist on the verge of an astonishing breakthrough. More than a century later, Juan Cabrillo will have to deal with that scientist’s legacy. During a covert operation, Cabrillo and the crew meticulously fake the sinking of the Oregon—but when an unknown adversary tracks them down despite their planning and attempts to assassinate them, Cabrillo and his team struggle to fight back against an enemy who seems to be able to anticipate their every move. They discover that a traitorous American weapons designer has completed the German scientist’s work, and now wields extraordinary power, sending the Oregon on a race against time to stop an attack that could lead to one man ruling over the largest empire the world has ever known.

The first nine books in this series were written by two different authors. This seems to be the growing trend of well know, well read authors these days but it sometimes takes the reader a few books to get accustomed to the different writing styles...hoping that yet another author won't come on the scene before the next book even gets published. Some reviewers have said that the topic was unbelievable but it is...thank heavens...fiction and the unbelievable can be given a little free reign. I really like this series...Juan Carbillo and the magnificent wonders of his ship, "The Oregon". Adventure, excitement, with a little history thrown in the mix, is always a given no matter who writes these books. Pick it up and enjoy the ride.

26Raspberrymocha
Jun 8, 12:53pm Top

The Charlemagne Pursuit by Steve Berry
#4 Cotton Malone dried
3.5 ⭐️

Cotton Malone lost his Dad when he was 10 years old. His father, Forest Malone was the Captain of an experimental 11 man submarine called NA-1. It was lost at sea in 1971. Cotton wanted to find out what had really happened to his Dad. To that end, he contacted the head of the super classified Magellan Billet and his friend Stephanie who directed the group. She sent him secret documents that alluded to the sub having actually been lost in the Antarctic rather than the Artic. In a round about manner, this brought Cotton to the Charlemagne Persuit. Twin German sisters are searching for their father who also was aboard the NR-1 sub, but he was a researcher. He was researching a lost Aryan civilization which he tracked to the Antarctic via a book which was buried with Charlemagne. Meanwhile, a US Navy admiral is tying up loose ends as he pursues an appointment to head the Joint Chief of Staffs. Cotton and company seem to be among those loose ends.

An enjoyable fast paced read with many twists and turns.

27Carol420
Jun 10, 10:00am Top


The Fallen by David Baldacci
Memory Man series (Amos Decker) Book #4
4.5 ★

Something sinister is going on in Baronville. The rust belt town has seen four bizarre murders in the space of two weeks. Cryptic clues left at the scenes--obscure bible verses, odd symbols--have the police stumped. Amos Decker and his FBI colleague Alex Jamison are in Baronville visiting Alex's sister and her family. It's a bleak place: a former mill and mining town with a crumbling economy and rampant opioid addiction. Decker has only been there a few hours when he stumbles on a horrific double murder scene. Then the next killing hits sickeningly close to home. And with the lives of people he cares about suddenly hanging in the balance, Decker begins to realize that the recent string of deaths may be only one small piece of a much larger scheme--with consequences that will reach far beyond Baronville. Decker, with his singular talents, may be the only one who can crack this bizarre case. Only this time--when one mistake could cost him everything--Decker finds that his previously infallible memory may not be so trustworthy after all.

Amos Decker is one of the most unusual detectives...maybe one of the most unusual persons, that any author has ever dreamed up. Like all of Baldacci's novels,you just don't want it to end. We learned by the ending...which was beautiful in spite of being on the sad side...that Decker has a soft side. One of the things I realized from being a long time fan of David Baldacci is that his wonderful series have a habit of only containing 5 or 6 books and this is Decker's # 4 not to mention that a new series is starting later this year. I hope this isn't "the beginning of the end" for Amos. I hate that this author makes us love them and then we lose them.

28Andrew-theQM
Jun 10, 10:57am Top

Excited to get to The Chalk Pit on Friday with the Group Read. Will be great to get back to the Ruth Galloway series.

29Carol420
Edited: Jun 10, 2:11pm Top


The Hanover Square Affair by Ashley Gardner
Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries Book #1
4 ★

London, 1816
Cavalry captain Gabriel Lacey returns to Regency London from the Napoleonic wars, burned out, fighting melancholia, his career ended. His interest is piqued when he learns of a missing girl, possibly kidnapped by a prominent member of Parliament. Lacey's search for the young woman leads to murder, corruption, and dealings with a leader of the underworld. At the same time, he struggles with his transition from a soldier's life to the civilian world, redefining his role with his former commanding officer, and making new friends--from the top of society to the street girls of Covent Garden.


Along the way Captain Lacey is forced to face many of the demons from his own past in order to get at the truth. I found the book to be a well written mystery. The solution isn't "in your face" obvious and the interactions between the characters was certainly interesting. Captain Lacey, himself, is a tragic figure and in parts of the book I couldn't help but wonder if he wasn't his own worst enemy. Despite that, he is very sympathetic and definitely worth rooting for. I would certainly read more of his adventures, especially if there is some hint that he manages to find some happiness along the

30EadieB
Edited: Jun 12, 12:05pm Top


✔☊The Outsider by Stephen King - 576 pgs. - ★★ - 6/11/2018
I'm a Stephen King fan but this book was a disappointment to me. I liked the first 200 pages but after that it went off into an unbelievable tangent and really got boring. I do not enjoy authors who put their political views into the story. Major turnoff. I honestly believe that this book is authored by Harlan Coben as he is frequently mentioned in the book. This writing is not Stephen King's. Read King's older books if you want the real King.

31Andrew-theQM
Jun 11, 3:29pm Top

>30 EadieB: Good Old Harlan! That is a disappointing review!

32EadieB
Jun 11, 4:20pm Top

>31 Andrew-theQM: I'm not sure Harlan wrote this but I can't believe that Steven King wrote it either. He seems to be getting lazy in his writing and not being his creative self.

33Andrew-theQM
Jun 11, 5:51pm Top

>32 EadieB: That’s a real shame although up to press only read three Stephen King books : 11.22.63, Joyland and The Dark Tower : The Gunslinger, Hope to start The Drawing Of The Three this week. Finding The Dark Tower series intriguing : Tolkien style epic meets western, although only really started what feels like a prologue with the first book.

34EadieB
Jun 11, 6:25pm Top

>33 Andrew-theQM: The Drawing of the Three is more interesting than The Gunslinger. You should read The Shining. That one is really good.

35Andrew-theQM
Jun 11, 7:26pm Top

>34 EadieB: I’ve always tended to avoid horror, is it horror?

36EadieB
Edited: Jun 11, 8:16pm Top

>35 Andrew-theQM: Yes it is but the thrillers we read are worst than the horror in The Shining. It more like supernatural. It is also on the 1001 book list.

37Carol420
Jun 12, 5:55am Top

>35 Andrew-theQM: Watch the DVD if you don't like reading about these things...but >36 EadieB: is right...I wouldn't call it horror...it's supernatural.

38Carol420
Jun 12, 10:08am Top


The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware
4★

On a day that begins like any other, Hal receives a mysterious letter bequeathing her a substantial inheritance. She realizes very quickly that the letter was sent to the wrong person—but also that the cold-reading skills she’s honed as a tarot card reader might help her claim the money. Soon, Hal finds herself at the funeral of the deceased…where it dawns on her that there is something very, very wrong about this strange situation and the inheritance at the center of it.

This book was very readable and the characters were human and mostly likable. A good comparison would perhaps be to her book 'In the Deep Dark Woods'. It's a complicated twisty mystery with a sharp heroine that you have to feel some sympathy for and has you hoping throughout the book that she'll win in the end. She has walked into a family with secrets...a grandmother that she knew noting about...and a secret fortune. Overall it's an intriguing story that keeps you reading as any good book should.

39EadieB
Edited: Jun 12, 2:59pm Top


A Gathering of Secrets by Linda Castillo - 308 pgs. - ★★★★★
I would like to thank NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for an advanced reader's copy for an honest review.

A Gathering of Secrets by Linda Castillo is the 10th book in the Kate Burkholder series. I have read all the books to date and have found them all to be intriguing mysteries. The books are an interesting look at the Amish life in Painters Mill. Kate Burkholder used to belong to the Amish community but she is now the current Chief of Police. The Amish are not always trusting of the police but Kate understands this. She tries to make them feel at ease while questioning them about the arson murder of eighteen-year-old Danny Gingrich. Kate has some demons that haunt her from an experience when she was younger and the death of Danny Gingrich brings back some of those feelings from the past. What are the Amish hiding and why are they hesitant to tell her the truth? Read this book and find out all the secrets that Kate uncovers.

40EadieB
Edited: Yesterday, 7:33am Top


Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison - 581 pgs. - ★★★★
This is a debut novel by Ralph Ellison about what it's like to grow up as a black man in mid-century America. It has many experiences that show how blacks are treated just because they are black. This book should not be confused with H.G. Wells book where the invisible man was actually invisible. Race is what will keep this black man in his permanent underclass status thus denying him his humanity. It is a powerful read and should not be missed.

41Andrew-theQM
Jun 12, 3:08pm Top

>36 EadieB: >37 Carol420: Based on that May give the book a try! 😊

42Sergeirocks
Jun 12, 5:01pm Top

>41 Andrew-theQM: It's about ghosts - you won't find me reading it...!

43Hope_H
Edited: Jun 13, 12:53pm Top

Death of an Honest Man by M. C. Beaton
★ ★ ★ 1/2 - 244 pages

Paul English, a newcomer to the village of Cnothan, prides himself on his honesty; in reality. he is not so much honest as blunt and rude. So when he winds up missing, there are several suspects, including his shady housekeeper and her daughter, the minister, and helpful nurse. Hamish McBeth must solve this case before Chief Inspector Blair figures out what happened.

Another ho-hum entry into the series. The mystery isn't very challenging and much is made about spirits and their connection to a cat which Hamish thinks is Sonsie.

44Carol420
Jun 13, 6:20am Top

>41 Andrew-theQM: >42 Sergeirocks: There are some ghosts but it's more about possession.

45gaylebutz
Jun 13, 1:31pm Top

Impact by Douglas Preston
3.5 ★

Description
Wyman Ford is tapped for a secret expedition to Thailand ... to locate the source of strangely beautiful gemstones that do not appear to be of this world. Meanwhile, a young woman in Maine borrows her father's boat to search the outer islands for the meteorite that lit up the sky in her small town. Also, a scientist at the National Propulsion Facility discovers an inexplicable source of gamma rays in the outer Solar System. He is found decapitated, the data missing. Ford soon realizes the jewel mine he seeks is much more than it seems ... and it is strangely connected to the events happening on the other side of the world.

There was a lot of action and adventure in this story. It was entertaining for the most part. The source of the gamma rays and who wanted to hide the information was an interesting part of the plot. But the part with the young woman in Maine who kept risking her life and her friend’s more than once or twice got to be too much. Still, it kept my interest throughout and I liked the ending. When I went to add this to my books, I found that I had read this back in 2013. I thought some parts seemed vaguely familiar but mostly I had forgotten the story so it was still a good read!

46Carol420
Jun 13, 3:23pm Top

>45 gaylebutz: Isn't it funny how things repeat themselves and we aren't even aware of it. I've read books that I'd read before and not realized it and found that some I gave two entirely different ratings:)

47gaylebutz
Jun 13, 4:59pm Top

>46 Carol420: Ha ha that is funny that you ended with different ratings! And funny that we didn't remember enough to realize we'd read the book before.

48gaylebutz
Jun 13, 5:01pm Top

Winter of the World by Ken Follett
4 ★

Description
Winter of the World picks up right where the first book left off, as its five interrelated families -- American, German, Russian, English, Welsh -- enter a time of enormous social, political, and economic turmoil, beginning with the rise of the Third Reich, through the Spanish Civil War and the great dramas of World War II, up to the explosions of the American and Soviet atomic bombs.

This was a family saga that focused mostly on the grown children of the main characters from the first book, which I read. I enjoyed learning about the personal lives of these characters and how they were impacted by all the changes going on. Some of them took great risks to help to defeat the Nazis, Communists or Japanese. The history of the time was more interesting to me as seen from the personal perspective of these characters. I thought the 2nd half of the book was better than the first but I enjoyed it all.


49Andrew-theQM
Jun 13, 5:08pm Top

>48 gaylebutz: I totally loved this whole trilogy but book one and three were my favourite, and b cause the history was so recent wasn’t really looking forward to book 3!

50EadieB
Edited: Jun 15, 11:02am Top


Where the Red Ferns Grow by Wilson Rawls - 272 pgs. - ★★★★★
Captures the powerful bond between man and his best friend. A very good book but very sad in the end. Children and adults will love this story which is an interesting classic.

51Carol420
Jun 14, 9:01am Top

>50 EadieB: There are two of these on DVD. I like the first one more as it is based entirely on the book.

52gaylebutz
Jun 14, 11:58am Top

>49 Andrew-theQM: Interesting that 1 and 3 were favorites. I actually liked this book 2 better than 1, although I liked one also. I'm putting 3 on my list but not sure when I'll get to it - they are soooo big. I've never been that good with my history but mixing history with people's personal lives makes it very interesting.

53Andrew-theQM
Jun 14, 4:35pm Top

>52 gaylebutz: I agree, I did these via audiobooks.

54Andrew-theQM
Jun 14, 4:43pm Top

Schedule for Group Read of The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths, #9 in the Ruth Galloway series.

Friday 15th June : Prologue and Chapters 1 - 7
Saturday 16th June : Chapters 8 - 14
Sunday 17th June : Chapters 15 - 20
Monday 18th June : Chapters 21 - 24
Tuesday 19th June : Chapters 25 - 29 and Epilogue

55Carol420
Jun 15, 8:55am Top


Silent Witness by Richard North Patterson
Tony Lord Book #2
4.5 ★

After the murder of his high school sweetheart left him shattered, Tony Lord vowed never to return to his Ohio hometown of Lake City. Twenty-eight years later, Tony is a successful California criminal lawyer with a beautiful celebrity wife. He's living the good life…until long-buried memories come crashing down when he hears from an old friend, who needs his help.

Sam Robb is a track coach at Lake City High. He swears he is not responsible for the death of one of his female team members. After the murder of his high school sweetheart left him shattered, Tony Lord vowed never to return to his Ohio hometown of Lake City. Twenty-eight years later, Tony is a successful California criminal lawyer with a beautiful celebrity wife. He's living the good life…until long-buried memories come crashing down when he hears from an old friend, Sam Robb...who needs his help. Back when they were teenagers, Sam stood by Tony when he was a suspect in his young girlfriend's murder―and Tony desperately wants to do the same for him today. In doing so, Tony will have to revisit his troubled past and probe the darkest secrets of small-town life to get to the truth. And what he will find is more shocking than he ever could have imagined.


I had never read a Richard North Patterson novel before...but am so glad that this one caught my eye. His work is outstanding. So much so that I believe he will join the ranks of my favorite mystery writers. I really enjoyed the book. The story was well told making it a "page turner" I had worked out who had probably committed the crime before the end but still was surprised by some of the evidence. Anyone that likes a good mystery along with some court room drama will really like this book.

56EadieB
Jun 15, 11:03am Top


✔The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan - 288 pgs. - ★★★★★ - 6/14/2018
Finished the audio of this beautiful story of 4 Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco who form The Joy Luck Cub. 40 years later story and history continue. Amy Tan examines deep connections between mothers and daughters. A very moving account and a true classic. Sad but story ends on a very positive note.

57Carol420
Jun 16, 4:35pm Top


Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin
Inspector Rebus series Book #21
4★

As he settles into an uneasy retirement, Rebus has given up his favorite vices. There's just one habit he can't shake: he can't let go of an unsolved case. It's the only pastime he has left, and up until now, it's the only one that wasn't threatening to kill him. But when Rebus starts reexamining the facts behind the long-ago murder of a glamorous woman at a luxurious hotel, the past comes roaring back to life with a vengeance. And as soon as Rebus starts asking questions about the long-forgotten crime, a fresh body materializes. As he connects the mysteries of the past to those of the present, Rebus learns that he's not the only one with an insatiable curiosity about what happened in that hotel room forty years ago, and that someone will stop at nothing to ensure that the crime remains ancient history.

Another visit with one of my favorite characters in one of my favorite cites...Edinburgh. Our Rebus is getting old and starting to slow down and take heath issues more seriously. One of the things that he also takes seriously is unsolved murders...especially those that he was connected with years ago but was taken off of before he could solve them. Some reviewers described Rebus as "the old war horse"...that may be truer than we think but it's good to see that he's not quite ready to hang up his saddle and be put out to pasture. Looking forward to more of Rebus.

58EadieB
Yesterday, 7:33am Top


The Guilty Dead by P.J. Tracy - 336 pgs. - ★★★★★
Gregory Norwood is found with a gun in his hand on the anniversary of his son's death from an overdose of heroin. It appears that Gregory may have committed suicide. Minneapolis detectives Leo Magozzi and Gino Rolseth are called in to handle the case. Something is not right and the detectives believe Norwood's death is not suicide. Magozzi calls on Grace MacBride, Monkeewrench Software’s founder and chief computer genius. She and her motley crew of partners begin to unravel connections between Norwood’s death and an even larger plot. Will they find the killer and save hundreds of lives doing so?

This is the 9th installment of the Monkeewrench series by P.J. Tracy and I would have to say the best of the series so far. I have read all the books and would suggest reading them in order as the storyline builds from one book to the next. I find the characters to be very unique and quite interesting. The plot kept the pages turning until the very surprising ending. I look forward to the next installment and I would highly recommend this series to those who love humor with their mysteries.

I would like to thank Crooked Lane Books and NetGalley for an advanced copy of this book for an honest review.

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