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DeltaQueen's Random Miscellaneous Challenge - Part 5

This is a continuation of the topic DeltaQueen's Random Miscellaneous Challenge - Part 4.

2019 Category Challenge

Join LibraryThing to post.

1DeltaQueen50
Jul 17, 12:59pm Top



We are in the middle of summer and my thoughts seem to be heading for the beach. Welcome, my name is Judy and I live in the suburbs of Vancouver, B. C., Canada. I love to welcome visitors to my thread to discuss books and life. An assortment of random quotes gave me the idea of setting up some miscellaneous challenges to help me shrink my TBR pile this year. Some of these quotes are from famous people while others are credited to “anonymous’ and have been taken from advertisements and greeting cards. What they have in common is that they all paint a colourful picture of life and were easily molded into category subjects.

I have been doing the Category Challenge for a good number of years and I love the loose structure this challenge gives to my reading. As always I have a goal of removing books from my shelves, but also as usual, I expect that I will be crossing myself up by all the additions I add during the year. My top priority will be reading from my own shelves and Kindle but another 2019 book goal is to continue reading books from the 1,001 Books to Read Before You Die List. I also love to participate in the various “Cats” that are established every year, hopefully my “Cat” reading will fit into my already set categories. Call me crazy but I’m going for 19 categories and have chosen 19 quotes fit my categories. I plan to read at least 8 books from most categories.

I enjoy the company of my husband, sipping a glass of wine, reading a good book, going for walks and, my family. But I also have a weird enjoyment of dark, twisted stories and I avidly watch “The Walking Dead” on TV.

Please feel free to join in on any conversations that are going on here, the welcome mat is always out.



2019 Reading Goals

1. My own books are my top priority, this includes my shelves, my two Kindles, my audio books and to a lesser extent my library list.
2. Read books from the 1,001 Books to Read Before You Die List
3. Only participate in challenges where I already have a book that fits

2DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 1:03pm Top

2019 Categories


A. Armchair Travel: “To those who can dream, there is no such place as faraway.”
Anonymous

I will read 8 books set in 8 different countries

B. Book Bullets: I Get By With A Little Help From My Friends
Lennon-McCartney

So many of the books on my shelves and Kindle are there because of recommendations from friends here on Library Thing. I will read at least 8 books and hopefully more of these recommendations

C. One Word Titles: “Better than a thousand hollow words, is one word that brings peace.”
Buddha

I will read at least 8 Books that have a one word title.

D. Love Stories: “Every love story is beautiful, but my favorite is ours.”
Anonymous

I will read 8 books that have a connection to love.

E. Reading From My Shelves: “Having too many books is not the problem. Not having enough shelving – That’s A Problem.”
Anonymous

This category will be for books that I pull from my shelves either to fulfill a challenge or simply just because I felt like reading it at this point in time.

F. Let’s Eat!: “People who love love food are always the best people.”
Julia Child

I will read at least 8 books that have an item of food or drink in the title.

G. Doing My ABCs: Okay everybody, line up in alphabetical order according to your height.”
Casey Stengel

Throughout the year I will randomly read alphabetically by author’s name. Will use these reads for the AlphaKit.

H. 1,001 Books List: “A Classic never goes out of style.”
Coca-Cola Ad

Because of a bet with my brother I have been reading on books from the 1001 Books to Read Before You Die List, trying to catch up with his total. This is where I will list most of my reads from that list.

I. Series: “Happiness is finding the first good book of a series and knowing there are more to follow.”
Anonymous

In an effort to catch up in my series reading, I will read at least 8 series books.

J. Crime Stories: “Reading mysteries is recreation for intelligent minds.”
Donna Andrews

I will read at least one mystery or police procedural every month.

K. Vintage Crime: “I specialize in murders of quiet, domestic interest
Agatha Christie

I am a huge fan of the classic mysteries from the golden age of detective fiction and I will read at least 8 classic mysteries over the course of the year.

L. Out of the Past: “The more you know about the past, the better prepared you are for the future.”
Teddy Roosevelt

I will read at least one book a month that delves into history – as set by the Reading Through Time Group or to fit other challenges

M. Science Fiction: “If you take the shackles off your imagination, you can go anywhere with science fiction.
Lani Tupu

I will read at least 8 science fiction books over the course of the year.

N. Fantasy: “A Single Dream is More Powerful that a Thousand Realities”
J.R.R. Tolken

I will read at least 8 fantasy books over the course of the year.

O. Young At Heart: “Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.”
Walt Disney

I will read 8 YA books during the year.

P. Non-Fiction: “Any truth is better than indefinite doubt”
Arthur Conan Doyle

I will read at least 8 non-fiction books during the year

Q. Library List: Libraries: “The medicine chest of the soul”
Inscribed over the door of the library at Thebes

It’s not just about my own shelves. I will also read the following from the library in an effort to reduce my very long library list.

R. Saddle Up!: Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway!
John Wayne

Books about the American West and the cowboy way will be make up this category.

S. Overflow: “Sleep is good, he said, and books are better.”
George R.R. Martin

Books that don’t fit any of the above challenges, will be placed here.

3DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 1:03pm Top

Books Read



Pages Read



Read From My Shelves


4DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 1:04pm Top

How I Rate Books:

I am not a professional book critic nor do I consider myself to be an expert on literary standards, my reviews are based on my reaction to the book and the opinions expressed are my own personald thoughts and feelings.

2.0 ★: I must have been dragged, kicking and screaming, to finish this one!

2.5 ★: Below Average but I finished the book for one reason or another.

3.0 ★: Average, a solid read that I finished but can't promise to remember

3.5 ★: Above Average, there's room for improvement but I liked this well enough to pick up another book by this author.


4.0 ★: A very good read and I enjoyed my time spent with this story

4.5 ★: An excellent read, a book I will remember and recommend

5.0 ★: Sheer perfection, the right book at the right time for me

I use decimal points to further clarify my thoughts about the book, therefore you will see books rated 3.8 to show it was better than a 3.5 but not quite a 4.0; etc. These small adjustments help me to remember how a book resonated with me.

5DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 12, 4:25pm Top

2019 PopSugar Challenge



01 - A book becoming a movie in 2019: The Sun Is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon
02 - A book that makes you nostalgic: The Complete Beatles by Steve Turner
03 - A book written by a musician (fiction or nonfiction): Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy by Mike Love
04 - A book you think should be turned into a movie: The Rules of Survival by Nancy Werlin
05 - A book with at least one million ratings on Goodreads: The Fellowship of the Ring by J. R. R. Tolkien
06 - A book with a plant in the title or on the cover - Sycamore by Bryn Chancellor
07 - A reread of a favorite book: The Way West by A. B. Gurthrie, Jr.
08 - A book about a hobby: Dear Fahrenheit 451 by Annie Spence
09 - A book you meant to read in 2018: The Case of the Late Pig by Margery Allingham
10 - A book with "pop", "sugar" or "challenge" in the title: The Sugar Pavilion by Rosalind Laker
11 - A book with an item of clothing or accessory on the cover: The Dress Shop of Dreams by Meena Van Praag
12 - a book inspired by mythology, legend or folklore: Zahrah The Windseeker by Nnedi Okorafor
13 - A book published posthumously: I'll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara
14 - a book you see someone reading on TV or in a movie - Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
15 - A retelling of a classic: The Stepsister Scheme by Jim C. Hines
16 - A book with a question in the title: When Will There Be Good News? by Kate Atkinson
17 - A book set on a college or university campus: Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis
18 - a book about someone with a super power: Ex-Heroes by Peter Clines
19 - a book told from multiple POVs: The Sultan's Wife by Jane Johnson
20 - a book set in space
21 - a book by two female authors: Live Bait by P. J. Tracy
22 - A book with a title that contains "salty", "sweet", "bitter" or "spicy"
23 - A book set in Scandinavia: Beartown by Fredrik Backman
24 - a book that takes place in a single day: Lillian Boxfish Takes A Walk by Kathleen Rooney
25 - a debut novel: The Last One by Alexandra Oliva
26 - a book that's published in 2019: The Lost Girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff
27 - a book featuring an extinct or imaginary creatures: The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien
28 - a book recommended by a celebrity you admire
29 - a book with "love" in the title - I Think I Love You by Alison Pearson
30 - a book featuring an amateur detective: The Mirror Crack'd From Side to Side by Agatha Christie
31 - A book about a family: Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig
32 - A book written by an author from Asia, Africa or South America: Whitefly by Abdelilah Hamdouchi
33 - A book with a zodiac sign or astrology term in the title: Salt Houses by Hala Alyan
34 - a book that includes a wedding; Romancing Mr. Bridgerton by Julia Quinn
35 - A book by an author whose first and last names start with the same letter: Finders Keepers by Belinda Bauer
36 - A ghost story
37 - a book with a two-word title: Deep Creek by Dana Hand
38 - A novel based on a true story: Sundance by David Fuller
39 - A book revolving around a puzzle or game: The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin
40 - Your favorite prompt from a past Popsugar Reading Challenge

Advanced:

41 - A "cli fi" book: American War by Omar El Akkad
42 - A "choose-your-own-adventure" book: My Lady's Choosing by Kitty Curran
43 - An "own voices" book: Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
44 - Read a book during the season it is set in: Broken April by Ismail Kadare
45 - A LitRPG book: Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski
46 - A book with no chapters / unusual chapter headings / unconventionally numbered chapters
47 & 48 - Two books that share the same title: Legend by Marie Lu & Legend by David Gemmell
49 - A book that has inspired a common phrase or idiom: Pollyanna by Eleanor Porter
50 - A book set in an abbey, cloister, monastery, vicarage, or convent: Murder At the Old Vicarage by Jill McGown

6DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 7, 9:31pm Top

A. Armchair Travel: “To those who can dream, there is no such place as faraway.”
Anonymous

I will read 8 books set in 8 different countries



Books Read

1. When the Rainbow Goddess Wept by Cecilia Manguerra Brainard - Philippines - 4.0 ★
2. The Nose by Nikolai Gogol - Russia - 4.0 ★
3. Broken April by Ismail Kadare - Albania - 3.7 ★
4. The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo - Malaysia - 2.8 ★
5. Salt Houses by Hala Alyan - Middle East - 4.0 ★
6. Moon At Nine by Deborah Ellis - Iran - 4.0 ★
7. Whitefly by Abdelilah Hamdouchi - Morocco - 4.0 ★
8. Queen of Water by Laura Resau - Ecuador - 4.0 ★

7DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 19, 11:15am Top

B. Book Bullets: I Get By With A Little Help From My Friends
Lennon-McCartney

So many of the books on my shelves and Kindles are there because of recommendations from friends here on Library Thing. I will read at least 8 books and hopefully more of these recommendations.



Books Read

1. The Rules of Survival by Nancy Werlin - Kerry - 5.0 ★
2. Hell’s Bottom, Colorado by Laura Pritchett - Katie - 5.0 ★
3. Logan's Run by William F. Nolan - Mamie - 3.6 ★
4. Beartown by Fredrik Backman - Chelle - 4.5 ★
5. Lillian Boxfish Takes A Walk by Kathleen Rooney - Linda P. & Beth - 4.0 ★
6. Norwegian By Night by Derek B. Miller - Mark - 4.2 ★
7. Dark Chapter by Winnie M. Li - Kay - 5.0 ★
8. The Face in the Frost by John Bellairs - 4.2 ★

8DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 13, 4:10pm Top

C. One Word Titles: “Better than a thousand hollow words, is one word that brings peace.”
Buddha

I will read at least 8 Books that have a one word title.



Books Read

1. Coldbrook by Tim Lebbon - 3.6 ★
2. You by Caroline Kepnes - 4.0 ★
3. Firmin by Sam Savage - 4.0 ★
4. Legend by David Gemmell - 5.0 ★
5. Sycamore by Bryn Chancellor - 3.6 ★
6. Safekeeping by Karen Hesse - 3.8 ★
7. Faithless by Karen Slaughter - 3.7 ★
8. Shift Omnibus by Hugh Howey - 2.5 #9733;

9DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 3, 9:42pm Top

D. Love Stories: “Every love story is beautiful, but my favorite is ours.”
Anonymous

I will read 8 books that have a connection to love.



Books Read

1. Romancing Mr. Bridgerton by Julia Quinn - 3.8 ★
2. I Think I Love You by Alison Pearson - 3.3 ★
3. Crescent by Diana Abu-Jaber - 4.0 ★
4. My Lady's Choosing by Kitty Curran - 2.0 ★
5. A Vintage Wedding by Katie Fforde - 4.0 ★
6. Love By the Morning Star by Laura L. Sullivan - 3.1
7. A Guide to the Birds of East Africa by Nicholas Drayson - 4.0 ★
8. From Penvarris With Love by Rosemary Aitken - 3.4 ★

10DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 12, 4:26pm Top

E. Reading From My Shelves: “Having too many books is not the problem. Not having enough shelving – That’s A Problem.”
Anonoymous

This category will be for books that I pull from my shelves either to fulfill a challenge or simply just because I felt like reading it at this point in time.



Books Read

1. I Am Legend by Richard Matheson - 5.0 ★
2. Girlchild by Tupelo Hassman - 4.2 ★
3. Celebrations At Thrush Green by Miss Read - 3.3 ★
4. Tales of the City by Armistead Maupin - 4.5 ★
5. Something in the Water by Catherine Steadman - 4.1 ★
6. The Moor by Sam Haysom - 3.7 ★
7. Hell is Empty by Craig Johnson - 3.2 ★
8. The Souvenir by Patricia Carlon - 4.0 ★
9. Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig - 3.6 ★

11DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 17, 6:21pm Top

F. Let’s Eat!: “People who love love food are always the best people.”
Julia Child

I will read at least 8 books that have an item of food or drink in the title.



Books Read

1. At The Sign of the Sugared Plum by Mary Hooper - 3.6 ★
2. Chocolate Wishes by Trisha Ashley - 3.7 ★
3. The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See - 4.3 ★
4. The Sugar Pavilion by Rosalind Laker - 4.0 ★
5. A House of Pomegranates by Oscar Wilde - 3.4 ★
6. The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares by Joyce Carol Oates - 4.5 ★
7. The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver - 5.0 ★

12DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 21, 9:49pm Top

G. Doing My ABCs: "Okay everybody, line up in alphabetical order according to your height.”
Casey Stengel

Throughout the year I will randomly read alphabetically by author’s name. Will match my reads to the AlphaKit monthly letters.



Books Read

1. A - American War by Omar El Akkad - 3.8 ★
2. B - His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet - 4.2 ★
3. C - His Monkey Wife by John Collier - 2.0 ★
4. D - The Divine Wind by Garry Disher - 4.0 ★
5. E
6. F
7. G
8. H - Lady of Quality by Georgette Heyer - 3.5 ★
9. I - The Draining Lake by Arnaldur Indridason - 4.0 ★
10. J - The Sultan's Wife by Jane Johnson - 4.5 ★
11. K - At Home In Mitford by Jan Karon - 4.0 ★
12. L - Legend by Marie Lu - 3.7 ★
13. M - The Delivery Man by Joe McGuinniss Jr. - 2.5 ★
14. N - Collusion by Stuart Neville - 4.5 ★
15. O - Zahrah The Windseeker by Nnedi Okorafor - 4.0 ★
16. P - Lost And Found by Carolyn Parkhurst - 4.0 ★
17. Q - The Alice Network by Kate Quinn - 3.7 ★
18. R
19. S
20. T
21. U - The Witchfinder's Sister by Beth Underdown - 3.6 ★
22. V - Oushata Massacre by Robert Vaughan - 3.2 ★
23. W
24. X - Disappeared by Francisco X. Stork - 4.2 ★
25. Y
26. Z

13DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 16, 11:39am Top

H. 1,001 Books List: “A Classic never goes out of style.”
Coca-Cola Ad

Due to an on-going bet with my brother I have been reading books from the 1001 Books to Read Before You Die List, trying to catch up with his total. This is where I will list most of my reads from that list.



Books Read

1. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston - 4.5 ★
2. The Country Girls by Edna O'Brien - 4.2 ★
3. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert - 4.0 ★
4. The Double by Jose Saramago - 3.8 ★
5. Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes - 4.0 ★
6. Lives of Girls and Women by Alice Munro - 4.2 ★
7. House of Mirth by Edith Wharton - 4.2 ★
8. Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis - 2.5 ★
9. Portrait of the Artist As A Young Man by James Joyce - 3.0 ★
10. The Robber Bride by Margaret Atwood - 4.5 ★
11. Adam Bede by George Eliot - 4.0 ★
12. The Quiet American by Graham Greene - 4.1 ★
13. The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole - 3.4 ★
14. The Violent Bear It Away by Flannery O'Connor - 2.0 ★
15. Kieron Smith, Boy by James Kelman - 3.3 ★

14DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 2, 12:35pm Top

I. Series: “Happiness is finding the first good book of a series and knowing there are more to follow.”
Anonymous

In an effort to catch up in my series reading, I will read at least 8 series books. I expect the SeriesCat will help me in making my reading choices.



Books Read

1. Excursion to Tindari (5) by Andrea Camilleri - 4.0 ★
2. Finders Keepers by Belinda Bauer - 4.5 ★
3. The Strange Death of Fiona Griffiths by Harry Bingham - 4.3 ★
4. When Will There Be Good News? by Kate Atkinson - 5.0 ★
5. The Last Detective by Peter Lovesey - 4.1 ★
6. The Devil's Star by Jo Nesbo - 4.2 ★
7. A Finer End by Deborah Crombie - 4.0 ★
8. Cold in Hand by John Harvey - 4.3 ★

15DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 1:34pm Top

J. Crime Stories: “Reading mysteries is recreation for intelligent minds.”
Donna Andrews

I will read at least one mystery or police procedural every month.



Crime Stories

1. See How Small by Scott Blackwood - 3.8 ★
2. The Yard Dog by Sheldon Russell - 3.4 ★
3. Farewell My Lovely by Raymond Chandler - 4.2 ★
4. Kiss Her Goodbye by Allan Guthrie - 3.8 ★
5. Waltz Into Darkness by Cornell Woolrich - 4.2 ★
6. Live Bait by P. J. Tracy - 4.5 ★
7. Murder At The Old Vicarage by Jill McGown - 3.8 ★

16DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 14, 9:03pm Top

K. Vintage Crime: “I specialize in murders of quiet, domestic interest
Agatha Christie

I am a huge fan of the classic mysteries from the golden age of detective fiction and I will read at least 8 classic mysteries over the course of the year.



Books Read

1. The Secret of Chimneys by Agatha Christie - 3.8 ★
2. The Private Wound by Nicholas Blake - 3.4 ★
3. The Case of the Late Pig by Margery Allingham - 3.8 ★
4. Towards Zero by Agatha Christie - 4.0 ★
5. The Nursing Home Murder by Ngaio Marsh - 3.5 ★
6. The Mirror Crack'd From Side to Side by Agatha Christie - 3.8 ★
7. The Nine Tailors by Dorothy Sayers - 5.0 ★
8. Rose's Last Summer by Margaret Millar - 3.3 ★

17DeltaQueen50
Edited: Today, 9:40pm Top

L. Out of the Past: “The more you know about the past, the better prepared you are for the future.”
Teddy Roosevelt

I enjoy historical fiction and will use this category for my Reading Thru Time choices or any other historical stories that don't fit elsewhere.



Books Read

1. The Secret Chord by Geraldine Brooks - 4.2 ★
2. The Colour by Rose Tremain - 4.5 ★
3. Footprints - Secret lives At Bletchley Park by Philomena Liggins - 2.0 ★
4. An Echo In The Bone by Diana Gabaldon - 4.3 ★
5. The Lost Girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff - 3.0 ★
6. Confessions of a Pagan Nun by Kate Horsley - 3.8 ★
7. Stone Spring by Stephen Baxter - 4.0 ★

18DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 21, 6:13pm Top

M. Science Fiction: “If you take the shackles off your imagination, you can go anywhere with science fiction.
Lani Tupu

I will read at least 8 science fiction books over the course of the year.



Books Read

1. City by Clifford D. Simak - 3.4 ★
2. Mordacious by Sara Lyons Fleming - 4.3 ★
3. The Final Six by Alexandra Monir - 4.0 ★
4. Ex-Heroes by Peter Clines - 3.7 ★
5. The Last One by Alexandra Oliva - 4.0 ★
6. Micro by Michael Crichton & Richard Preston - 2.0 ★
7. The Witches of Karres by James H. Schmitz - 4.0 ★
8. Komarr by Lois McMaster Bujold - 4.2 ★

19DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 1:39pm Top

N. Fantasy: “A Single Dream is More Powerful that a Thousand Realities”
J.R.R. Tolken

I will read at least 8 fantasy books over the course of the year.



Books Read

1. A Conspiracy of Kings by Megan Whalen Turner - 4.1 ★
2. The Stepsister Scheme by Jim C. Hines - 4.2 ★
3. Half A War by Joe Abercrombie - 4.5 ★
4. The Fellowship of the Ring by J. R. R. Tolkien - 4.2 ★
5. The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien - 4.5 ★
6. Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski - 4.0 ★
7. The Return of the King by J. R. R. Tolkien - 5.0 ★
8. Autumn Princess, Dragon Child by Lian Hearn - 4.2 ★

20DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 20, 12:01pm Top

O. Young At Heart: “Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.”
Walt Disney

I will read at least 8 YA books during the year.



Books Read

1. The Other Side of Dawn by John Marsden - 4.0 ★
2. Fire & Flood by Victoria Scott - 3.7 ★
3. The Star of Kazan by Eva Ibbotson - 4.0 ★
4. Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan - 4.5 ★
5. Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter - 3.6 ★
6. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin - 4.0 ★
7. Walkabout by James Vance Marshall - 4.5 ★
8. Origin by Jessica Khoury - 3.7 ★

21DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 22, 11:00pm Top

P. Non-Fiction: “Any truth is better than indefinite doubt”
Arthur Conan Doyle

I will read at least 8 non-fiction books during the year



Books Read

1. The Profession of Violence by John Pearson - 3.7 ★
2. Dove by Robin L. Graham - 3.0 ★
3. The Complete Beatles by Steve Turner - 5.0 ★
4. I’ll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara - 4.0 ★
5. Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann - 4.0 ★
6. Dear Fahrenheit 451 by Annie Spence - 3.7 ★
7. Code Girls by Liza Mundy - 4.2 ★
8. Blue Highways: A Journey Into America by William Least Heat-Moon - 4.5 ★
9. Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy by Mike Love
10. Jackie's Girl by Kathy McKeon - 3.7 ★

22DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 5, 11:21am Top

Q. Library List: Libraries: “The medicine chest of the soul”
Inscribed over the door of the library at Thebes

It’s not just about my own shelves. I will also read the following from the library in an effort to reduce my very long library list.



Books Read

1. A New Day by Beryl Matthews - 3.3 ★
2. The Weight of Blood by Laura McHugh - 4.0 ★
3. The Dress Shop of Dreams by Meena Van Praag - 3.6 ★
4. Buffalo Trail by Jeff Guinn - 4.2 ★
5. Beat the Reaper by Josh Bazell - 4.2 ★
6. The Sun Is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon - 4.1 ★
7. The Walking Dead: The Rise of the Governor by R. Kirkman and J. Bonansinga - 4.0 ★
8. Closed Doors by Lisa O'Donnell - 4.2 &39733;

23DeltaQueen50
Edited: Today, 12:40pm Top

R. Saddle Up! - “Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway!”
John Wayne

Books about the American West and the cowboy way will be make up this category.



Books Read

1. Deep Creek by Dana Hand - 4.2 ★
2. Sundance by David Fuller - 4.0 ★
3. Glorious by Jeff Guinn - 4.5 ★
4. The Color of Lightning by Paulette Jiles - 4.5 ★
5. The Hide Hunters by Lewis B. Patten - 3.6 ★
6. The Way West by A. B. Guthrie - 5.0 ★
7. Huck Out West by Robert Coover - 4.2 ★

24DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 19, 9:51pm Top

S. Overflow: “Sleep is good, he said, and books are better.”
George R.R. Martin

Just in case I don't have enough books to read, any that don't fit the above categories will reside here.



Books Read

1. Three Graphic Novels: Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World by Penelope Bagieu, Step Aside, Pops by Kate Beaton, Sabrina by Nick Drnaso
2. The Walking Dead Volume 28: A Certain Doom
The Walking Dead Volume 29: Lines We Cross
The Walking Dead Volume 30: New World Order
3. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy by Rey Terciero and Brie Indigo - 4.2 ★

25DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 1:50pm Top

2019 Reading Plans



January:

February:

March: Hosting the SeriesCat: A Series Book by a Favorite Author

April: Hosting the Reading Through Time Monthly Theme
Hosting the ScaredyKit: Modern Horror /Thrillers
Group Read: The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring

May: Hosting the CalendarCat
Group Read of Lord of the Rings - The Two Towers

June: Group Read of Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King

July: Starting the Group Read of Tom Jones

August: Group Read of Tom Jones

September: Group Read of Tom Jones

October: Hosting the TBRCat

November: Hosting the RandomCat

December: Hosting the SFFFKit: Reader's Choice

26DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 3:58pm Top

My Random Miscellaneous thought for thread #5:



and:

27thornton37814
Jul 17, 2:03pm Top

Happy new thread!

28mstrust
Jul 17, 2:41pm Top

Happy new thread, Judy!

29msf59
Jul 17, 3:03pm Top

Happy New Thread, Judy. I hope you are having a fine week.

30BLBera
Jul 17, 3:31pm Top

Happy new thread, Judy.

>15 DeltaQueen50: I love all your memes, but this is my favorite.

31VivienneR
Jul 17, 3:57pm Top

Happy new thread, Judy. I love the beach therapy theme.

32DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 17, 4:01pm Top

>27 thornton37814: >28 mstrust: >29 msf59: >30 BLBera: Thank you. I have fallen behind on LT in the last week or so and need to spend some time catching up with everyone's threads. But at least my thread is up to date! ;)

>31 VivienneR: Thanks Vivienne. I really could do with some sunny time at the beach but unfortunately we woke up to rain today. This dull weather is supposed to last until the weekend and then (fingers crossed) a sunny Saturday and Sunday.

33katiekrug
Jul 17, 4:09pm Top

Happy new one, Judy!

34DeltaQueen50
Jul 17, 4:22pm Top

>33 katiekrug: Thanks, Katie!

35tess_schoolmarm
Jul 17, 5:45pm Top

Happy new thread; love the beach!

36RidgewayGirl
Jul 17, 5:54pm Top

Happy new thread, Judy!

37Familyhistorian
Jul 18, 12:52am Top

Happy new thread, Judy. I hope you get beach weather soon. Send some over this way when you get it.

38MissWatson
Jul 18, 3:25am Top

Happy new thread, Judy. How I wish I could sneak off to that beach!

39dudes22
Jul 18, 4:52am Top

Happy New Thread, Judy! Looking at your tickers, it looks like you've done great with books off your TBR pile so far.

40Jackie_K
Jul 18, 8:21am Top

Happy new thread! I'm in awe of your reading stats - 133 books already!

41DeltaQueen50
Jul 18, 11:36am Top

>35 tess_schoolmarm: I love the beach as well, Tess. There have been times in my life where I lived in other parts of Canada and I missed being near the ocean.

>36 RidgewayGirl: Thanks, Kay.

>37 Familyhistorian: Well, from you lips, Meg. It looks like today is going to be very nice. Unfortunately, I have other things to do today so won't be going to a beach.

>38 MissWatson: I could really go for a long walk on a deserted beach right now. I want to sink my toes in the sand and feel the waves breaking over my feet.

>39 dudes22: I am finding it fairly easy to read from my shelves, Betty, mostly I have been pleased with what I have stocked. The downside is that I don't get to read the latest books immediately since I try to concentrate on what I already have.

>40 Jackie_K: I have been reading a few more audible books this year, Jackie, and I find they really make the numbers go up since they enable reading even while you are doing other things!

42DeltaQueen50
Jul 18, 11:39am Top

I will probably get to finish off a couple of books today as I will be spending most of it at the hospital. My husband is having a minor surgical procedure and so I will be taking him over to the hospital and then waiting to bring him home. I don't think they are fully knocking him out, but he will be sedated and won't be able to drive afterwards.

43jnwelch
Jul 18, 11:47am Top

Happy New Thread, Judy! I love that topper - beautiful visually, as well as wise.

I'm sorry your hubby is in the hospital, but "minor" sure sounds better than the other. Sending positive thoughts for it going well. Enjoy the silver lining reading time.

44RidgewayGirl
Jul 18, 1:19pm Top

>42 DeltaQueen50: Oh, that's fun. I did that with my husband not long ago. Luckily, his procedure was scheduled in the hospital with a Starbucks, so I had a nice time with a coffee and a book before being entertained by my husband's behavior as he recovered from the anesthesia. I hope you brought a cardigan. Hospitals are always so cold.

45mstrust
Jul 18, 2:28pm Top

Hoping your husband's hospital visit is over quickly, and that you have a comfortable chair while you wait!

46Helenliz
Jul 18, 4:18pm Top

Loving the beach topper.
Hope the minor procedure is over quickly and that you can read to while away the time.

47lindapanzo
Jul 18, 9:32pm Top

Loved the review of the William Least Heat Moon Book. That’s one I absolutely must get to.

The Pam Jenoff Book is one I’m reading. It’s just not grabbing me.

Interesting to read your thoughts on both.

48DeltaQueen50
Jul 18, 9:33pm Top

We are home and my husband is resting comfortably. He had a camera put down his throat today so they could look at a pocket that had developed, we were hoping it would be minor enough that it could be fixed at the same time, but unfortunately, that is not the case. He is going to need surgery and that will be most likely be done at the Vanvouver General Hospital but the medical wheels turn slowly so we expect the surgery won't be until the Fall.

>43 jnwelch: I managed to finish off two books, Joe, both rather short but I didn't think I would be able to concentrate on anything too long or too involved.

>44 RidgewayGirl: Kay, I had to smile a little at my hubby when he was coming out of the sedation. He had no idea where he was or what was going on. Luckily the sedation wore off fairly quickly and now he seems to be back to his normal self.

>45 mstrust: I was very lucky today, Jennifer, the chairs were super comfortable. High backs, nice armrests and deep cushions. Bliss! So many times chairs in waiting rooms are torture!
>46 Helenliz: Thanks Helen, looks like we have more trips to the hospital in our future. Well, no one said getting old is gonna be easy!

49DeltaQueen50
Jul 18, 9:44pm Top

134. A House of Pomegranates by Oscar Wilde - 3.4 ★
Category: Let's Eat
July TIOLI #3: Morphy's Challenge - The author has a family member that is also an author




A House of Pomegranates is a collection of fairy stories written by Oscar Wilde that were originally published in 1891. There are four stories in this collection:

The Young King
The Birthday of the Infanta
The Fisherman and His Soul
The Star-Child

These stories were written for children and are, in fact, morality fables. One warns of the danger of vanity while another explores the complexities of one’s soul. We read of “The Young King” as he learns the value of spiritual over the material. By far, the strangest story was ‘The Birthday of the Infanta” which tries to teach us not to judge on appearances but was quite tragic. In all these stories Wilde stresses beauty of the soul over the artifice of good looks.

There was a certain amount of charm to these stories but like many Victorian tales they come across as rather preachy and are harsh in their judgments. Each story seemed to find a certain amount of joy in suffering and punishment. While I didn’t love this collection, I did enjoy experiencing Wilde’s wit and creativity.

50DeltaQueen50
Jul 18, 10:01pm Top

135. The Souvenir by Patricia Carlon - 4.0
Category: From My Shelves
July AlphaKit: C
July TIOLI #15: A Mystery by a New-To-You Author Set Somewhere You Have Never Been



The Souvenir by Australian author, Patricia Carlon was originally published in 1970, yet for me the story felt very fresh and current. Two teenage girls meet on a summer hitch-hiking trip. One of them, stabs a young man to death. Each girl accused the other of the crime and the police could prove neither girl guilty. Four years go by and the sister of the victim hires a very unique private eye to find out which girl actually murdered her brother.

This psychological twister unfolds backwards and forward in time as we learn of the uneasy friendship that develops between the girls and the stolen mementos that cause the final argument. The author, perhaps a little too cleverly writes from an angle that makes one of the girls appear more likely to have committed the crime. I thought the story lost a little steam when it started to include both girls families but over all I found this to be a unique puzzler and quite a gripping read.

51EBT1002
Jul 19, 8:12pm Top

Hi Judy. Happy new-ish thread!

I wanted to let you know that I have set up the August SeriesCAT thread. This month is a pretty easy one, I think. Thanks for the reminder/nudge!

52DeltaQueen50
Jul 20, 11:45am Top

>51 EBT1002: You are welcome, Ellen. I know that you have been very busy in RL and this might have slipped your mind. As always, I am looking forward to picking books for this month's Cats.

53BLBera
Jul 20, 7:22pm Top

>50 DeltaQueen50: This one sounds interesting, Judy.

I hope your husband is recovering nicely and that his surgery goes well. Do you know when it will be yet?

54DeltaQueen50
Jul 20, 7:58pm Top

>53 BLBera: Hi Beth. My husband has his follow up appointment with his doctor this week and he will be giving us more information. I suspect this will be considered a lesser surgery so he may have to wait until later this Fall or even into the New Year.

55DeltaQueen50
Jul 21, 6:19pm Top

136. Komarr by Lois McMaster Bujold - 4.2 ★
Category: Science Fiction
July SFFFKit: Space Opera
July TBRCat: More Than One Book by this Author on My Shelf
July TIOLI #4: A Square from the Seattle Summer Adult Book Bingo 2019




Komarr by Lois McMaster Bujold is the twelfth book in chronological order in the science fiction series entitled The Vorkosigan Saga. While the story takes Miles in a new direction with his position of Imperial Auditor, the action and excitement levels remain high as Miles must unravel the mystery involving terrorists on the planet of Komarr. But for me, this was very much secondary to the main plot which involved the meeting of Miles and Ekaterin.

I have been waiting for Miles to find “the one” and I believe that he finally has. Ekaterin grew on me as the book progressed. At first she seemed timid and unsure of herself, but as the story progressed she came out of her shell, found her voice and now stands as the perfect candidate to be the next Lady Vorkosigan.

The Vorkosigan Saga books have all been great reads, the author writes in an enjoyable, easily accessible manner and her main characters are strong and likeable. Space Opera at it’s best with plenty of adventure, romance, science and fun, Komarr was another great edition to this outstanding series.

56msf59
Jul 21, 6:46pm Top

Happy Sunday, Judy. I hope you are enjoying a fine weekend and getting plenty of reading time in. I had a good day off.

57DeltaQueen50
Jul 22, 11:20am Top

>56 msf59: Hi Mark, we had a rather hot day here today so I spent the day relaxing and reading close to a fan. I'm not complaining, we haven't had too many really hot days this summer so I expect we are due a few. Already today there is a lovely breeze and it's much cooler.

58DeltaQueen50
Jul 22, 11:28am Top

137. A Guide to the Birds of East Africa by Nicholas Drayson - 4.0 ★
Category: Love Stories
July RandomCat: Birds
July TIOLI #5: The First Sentence in Chapters 1, 2 or 3 Contain a Number




A Guide to the Birds of East Africa by Nicholas Drayson is not a book about ornithology. There are lots of birds in the book, but it is actually an unconventional love story set in Kenya where the main characters are birdwatchers and their hobby is used to settle the difficult question of which suitor should have the pleasure of asking Mrs. Rose Mbikwa to the upcoming Hunt Ball.

Although rather overused, the word charming is the perfect word to describe this story. Mr. Malik, a quiet widower spends his Tuesday mornings on a bird walk guided by Mrs. Rose Mbikwa, a Scottish widow of a deceased Kenyan politician. He has a crush on Rose and wishes to ask her to the Hunt Ball, but before he does, Harry Khan shows up and also expresses his interest in the lovely Rose. To settle who will get to ask her, the members of their club come up with a contest where whichever man can spot and name the most birds will earn the right to ask Rose to the ball. While Harry Khan spends his time on safaris hunting down exotic birds, Mr. Malik runs into all kinds of problems right in Nairobi, including his car being stolen along with his birding notebook and a run in with renegade Somalis.

The simple plot is delightfully unrolled with captivating character sketches and glimpses into Kenyan life and politics. Much of the appeal and humour of the book is due to the somewhat older protagonists who prove that life doesn’t end when one reaches retirement age. The conclusion had a nice twist and was very satisfying.

59tess_schoolmarm
Jul 22, 11:56am Top

>58 DeltaQueen50: Great review! You've convinced me, on my wish list it's going!

60DeltaQueen50
Jul 22, 2:46pm Top

>59 tess_schoolmarm: It's a lovely little book, Tess. I'm sure it will have you smiling. :)

61dudes22
Jul 22, 7:51pm Top

>58 DeltaQueen50: - Another BB for me too!

62clue
Jul 22, 8:39pm Top

>58 DeltaQueen50: Me too, Amazon owes you.

63Familyhistorian
Jul 22, 11:26pm Top

>58 DeltaQueen50: That sounds like a good one, Judy.

64DeltaQueen50
Jul 23, 12:05am Top

>61 dudes22: Enjoy, Betty.

>62 clue: Ha, wouldn't it be fun if we all got a commission from Amazon!

>63 Familyhistorian: A Guide to the Birds of East Africa is a good one, Meg.

65VivienneR
Jul 23, 1:00am Top

>58 DeltaQueen50: I loved A Guide to the Birds of East Africa. I tried to talk my friend into reading it but she didn't trust my choice.

66jnwelch
Edited: Jul 23, 10:27am Top

>57 DeltaQueen50: Nice review of Komarr, Judy. It's one of my favorites because of Miles and Ekaterin meeting. The Vorkosigan Saga books have all been great reads, the author writes in an enjoyable, easily accessible manner and her main characters are strong and likeable. Space Opera at it’s best with plenty of adventure, romance, science and fun, Komarr was another great edition to this outstanding series. Well said! I completely agree.

I really like that review of A Guide to the Birds of East Africa, too, and I'm thumbing it. It's a good feeling to see this one mentioned. Charming may be overused, but it's the right word for this one, isn't it. I loved it.

67DeltaQueen50
Jul 23, 11:20am Top

>65 VivienneR: Well, your friend lost out on a very good read, I'd say. I am looking forward to passing A Guide to the Birds of East Africa on to my mother, I am pretty sure she will love it.

>66 jnwelch: Joe, I am very happy that Roni passed on her recommendation to the Vorkosigan series. I fell in love with first Cordelia and then with Miles. Such a great series. You know, speaking of book bullets, I think you may have been the one to hit me with A Guide to the Birds in East Africa some time ago. This is what I love about reading from my shelves - finding these gems tucked away.

68DeltaQueen50
Jul 23, 11:28am Top

I'm off to the eye doctor this morning which is fine except for those drops he will put in in order to see the back of my eyes. I am lucky enough that I can walk over to his office but I will probably be staggering home - must remember to be sure to take my sunglasses!

69RidgewayGirl
Jul 23, 4:58pm Top

>68 DeltaQueen50: I hope that you remembered your sunglasses and that it was a cloudy day, Judy!

70DeltaQueen50
Jul 23, 6:54pm Top

>69 RidgewayGirl: I did remember my sunglasses and the good news is that there was little to no change in my eyes so I don't have to see him for another 18 months. The eyedrops have completely worn off so I expect I will be doing some reading this evening.

71msf59
Jul 23, 6:55pm Top

Hi, Judy. I loved A Guide to the Birds of East Africa. I remember warbling about that one. Glad you got to it and enjoyed it.

72DeltaQueen50
Jul 23, 6:57pm Top

>71 msf59: Aha, then it was probably a double punch from both Joe and you that put A Guide to the Birds of East Africa on my shelf! ;)

73DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 25, 11:16am Top

138. The Quiet American by Graham Greene - 4.1 ★
Category: 1,001 Books List
July 1,001 Books Challenge: Author Has Multiple Entries on the 1,001 List
July TBRCat: Multiple Books by This Author on My Shelves
TIOLI #13: Rolling Challenge Based on Edgar Martinez




Set in Vietnam during the closing days of the French occupation, The Quiet American by Graham Greene tells the story of the conflict and the friendship between a jaded English reporter, Fowler, and a young and rather idealistic American operative, Pyle. The bone of contention between them is the beautiful Vietnamese woman Phuong. While Fowler offers her only a continuing relationship with no real security, Pyle declares his love and offers her marriage and protection.

With Phuong representing Vietnam, Fowler the old colonial system, and Pyle the over-eager America, this book has become an allegory for the end of colonialism and the beginning of America’s interest in keeping this corner of Asia free from communism. Pyle appears to believe absolutely in the American way of democracy but his methods have him entangled in guerrilla politics and when a bomb explodes in a busy square causing injury and death, Fowler decides that he must take a moral stand in this conflict.

I am a fan of Graham Greene and this book seems to perfectly set the scene for a place that was going to become very important historically. Although the book felt a little claustrophobic at times, the author’s ability to touch your emotions and make you think about the cost of one’s principles was delivered in a subtle and ingenious style. The Quiet American is another true classic from this author.

74DeltaQueen50
Jul 25, 11:15am Top

139. Dark Chapter by Winnie M. Li - 5.0 ★
Category: Book Bullets - Kay
TIOLI #4: Fits One of the Squares of the 2019 Seattle Summer Adult Book Bingo




Although a work of fiction, Dark Chapter by Winnie M. Li closely mirrors her own experience when she was raped while on a walk in a park near Belfast, Ireland. This story follows an American woman of Asian descent as she too is raped in Belfast. We work through all levels and all stages of the aftermath of this crime, the police interviews, medical examinations, the procedures to guard against AIDs and tests for infections, the months and years that it takes for the crime to not control all aspects of her life. The story totally overwhelms and captures the readers attention, but the author doesn’t stop there. She also attempts to get inside the mind of the rapist, a young psychologically damaged Irish traveller who learned his violent ways from his abusive father.

I was totally mesmerized by this book finding it both informative and riveting. Reading of Vivian Tan, a twenty-nine year old, highly educated, professional woman being accosted by a fifteen year old, illiterate teenager and having this encounter shape their lives so definitively was a compelling and harrowing experience.

I sincerely hope that the writing of Dark Chapter was a healing process for the author. I found this to be a courageous exploration of both the victim and the perpetrator's mindset before, during and after the rape. Dark Chapter was an excellent read, both suspenseful and full of tension. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to have a deeper understanding of the effects that this crime has on it’s victims.

75RidgewayGirl
Jul 25, 4:40pm Top

I'm glad you liked Dark Chapter, although "liked" is probably the wrong word. It was a powerful novel. I was impressed that she took up hiking again afterwards.

76DeltaQueen50
Jul 26, 11:36pm Top

>75 RidgewayGirl: Kay, I was glued to the pages. This book, in the way that it affected me, reminded me somewhat of We Need to Talk About Kevin. A very powerful read.

77RidgewayGirl
Jul 27, 9:29am Top

>76 DeltaQueen50: Part of its power, I think, was in the knowledge of how closely is followed her own experience. And in her willingness to try to understand her attacker.

78AHS-Wolfy
Jul 27, 10:33am Top

>73 DeltaQueen50: That is my favourite of the Graham Greene books I've read so far (admittedly not that many and I need to read more). Glad you enjoyed it.

79DeltaQueen50
Jul 27, 12:05pm Top

>77 RidgewayGirl: Certainly a book that I will remember for a long, long time.

>78 AHS-Wolfy: Dave, I've come to Graham Greene rather late and now I am trying to read everything by him that I can get a hold of. This was my third Greene with The End of the Affair and Brighton Rock being the other two - all very different and all very good.

80DeltaQueen50
Jul 28, 2:53pm Top

140. Faithless by Karin Slaughter - 3.7 ★
Category: One Word Titles
July TIOLI #12: Rolling Challenge - One Word Title That Matches a Letter From a Previous Entry




Faithless by Karin Slaughter is the 5th book in her series about medical examiner Sara Linton and her ex-husband (now boyfriend), police chief Jeffrey Tolliver. One evening as they are out walking in the woods they stumble upon a pipe sticking out of the ground, dig down to discover a coffin containing a recently deceased young woman who had been buried alive. This discovery soon leads them to a strange evangelical family that appear to be concealing many secrets. Meanwhile, secondary character, Detective Lena Adams is finding that this case is helping her re-think her own abusive relationship.

The mystery portion of the book is excellent with plenty of twists and turns to be figured out along the way. For me, the personal lives of the characters is becoming a little tiresome. I want some resolution to Sara’s and Jeffrey’s relationship and most of all, I want Lena to finally move forward to a better life. I will qualify this to say that all characters seem to make some important decisions by the end of the book, so hopefully in the next book they can finally sort themselves out.

In Faithless, Slaughter continues her combination of police procedures with the grim forensic details that give these books a stark reality. At over 500 pages, she also brings up issues of abortion, domestic abuse, forgiveness and revenge. While I would heartily suggest that no one should ever move to the high risk area of Grant County, I look forward to reading more about the crimes that appear all too often in this small corner of Georgia.

81jonesli
Edited: Jul 28, 6:20pm Top

Hi Judy, Karin Slaughter's Sara Linton series is one of my favorites. I remember devouring the whole series after reading the first book. I like how she brought Sara's character into another series with other characters which has worked well.

82thornton37814
Jul 29, 3:32pm Top

>80 DeltaQueen50: That reminds me I wanted to try the first in that series. I don't think I ever put it on a list in Overdrive. Just did so. I'll have to decide e- or audio-book format when I get caught up with other things.

83DeltaQueen50
Edited: Jul 30, 11:29am Top

>81 jonesli: Hi Lisa. The Karin Slaughter series is one that I keep forgetting about. When I read one of her books I get totally caught up in it but I then I let too much time go by between books. I need to catch up on so many series, yet never quite manage to.

>82 thornton37814: This is a good but gritty series, Lori. The author doesn't hesitate to write about some dark and violent things, but her stories are interesting and the characters are well developed. I hope you enjoy the series.

84ronincats
Jul 29, 8:15pm Top

Hi, Judy. I'm back to posting, but thanks for noticing I had gone quiet.

85DeltaQueen50
Jul 30, 11:30am Top

>84 ronincats: Hi Roni, good to see you back - Now I'll head over to your thread and catch up with you. :)

86DeltaQueen50
Aug 1, 11:56am Top

141. The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole - 3.4 ★
Category: 1,001 Books List
August ScaredyKit: Gothic Literature
August TIOLI #2: From First Sentence - Who, What, When, Where or How




I found The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole to be an odd yet entertaining story about a tyrant knight called Manfred, Prince of Otranto, and his family. Considered to be the father of Gothic romance fiction this fantasy is set in the middle ages, and is peopled by characters experiencing strong emotional and psychological distress. The story develops around a supernatural event that occurs at the beginning of the story and causes the death of Manfred’s only son and heir. Unfolding in a castle that comes with underground passages, sealed vaults, and trap doors, my favorite part of the story was when the young Princess Isabella, fearful for her virtue, is running away from Manfred through the dark and haunted castle.

In a melodramatic yet playful manner the story has the evil usurper, the noble yet humble rightful heir, two virtuous princesses and a host of other characters running around the Castle of Otranto confronting vanishing giants, pieces of enormous armour, moving artwork and each other.

This deceptively simple story deals with issues of inheritance, power and morality and religion. It is important to remember that this novel is the first of its kind and the plot, which appears overworked and familiar today is, indeed, the first of it’s kind and did cause quite a sensation in it’s day.

87DeltaQueen50
Aug 2, 12:38pm Top

142. Cold in Hand by John Harvey - 4.3 ★
Category: Series
August SeriesCat: Set in a Country That I Do Not Live In
TIOLI #8: A New-To-You Book By a Favorite Author




Cold in Hand by John Harvey is the 11th book in his Charlie Resnick series and some time has passed in the timing of the story. Charlie is getting ever closer to retirement age and is beginning to think and make plans for the event. He sees no great change as his life partner, Lynn Kellogg is quite a bit younger than him and still has her police career in front of her. Charlie and Lynn, who used to work together, now live together in a relationship that both are very happy in.

The first half of the book deals with how Lynn, stepping between two fighting teens, comes into the line of a bullet. Luckily she was wearing her safety vest, but one of the girls dies from her wounds. While Lynn is sidelined and recovering, Charlie is asked to work this case and help find who the shooter was, and who was actually being targeted - Lynn or the teen girl. While this case is on-going Lynn returns to work and gets more deeply involved in another of her murder cases. This one concerns a massage worker who had her throat slit in a sleazy parlour. This case involves some very nasty characters, Serbians, who also are gun runners. Lynn’s top priority is to protect the witnesses in this case, but then the trial is postponed and the suspect is given bail on the direction of Stuart Daines of the Serious Organized Crime Agency who warns Lynn off and obviously wants these criminals on the street so his gun-running case will gain traction.

As always, John Harvey excels in his gritty plotting. His eye for the details of police politics and his ability to deliver stories that seem to have come right from newspaper headlines bring a sense of reality to his police procedurals. In Cold in Hand, we also see Charlie at his lowest which helps to develop this well crafted character even further. I know the next book is the last in the series and I am both looking forward to the read and dreading the end of this favourite series.

88DeltaQueen50
Aug 3, 9:45pm Top

143. From Penvarris with Love by Rosemary Aitken - 3.4 ★
Category: Love Stories
August TIOLI #17: Published by a Two Word Publishing House




From Penvarris with Love by Rosemary Aitken is a romance novel that spans the years of World War I. Set in Penzance, Cornwall, Maud Olds and Belinda Richards are apprenticed to the local dress shop as seamstresses. When they are able to escape the stern, watchful eye of their patroness, Maude walks out with her childhood sweetheart, farmer Stanley. Belinda claims to have many admirers, but her eye is firmly on the handsome but footloose Jonah Lotts.

When the war comes, Stanley does his duty and enlists while Jonah spends his time trying to stay out of the war. The story does an excellent job of showing the impact that the war had on this small community. With these four young people, the author is able to show how the war brought so much change to people’s daily lives. While gentle Maude patiently waits for her fiance’s return, Belinda is being wooed by Jonah who thinks being married will keep him safe.

I was expecting this story to be sweet and simple, but I was pleased that the author was able to place her characters in fairly realistic predicaments which gave the book an authentic feel and kept my interest. While neither girl gets a picture perfect ending, the story does shows how opportunity and a future path can arise from sorrow and disillusionment.

89mathgirl40
Aug 3, 9:50pm Top

>55 DeltaQueen50: Great review of Komarr. This was the first Bujold book I'd ever read and though it appears late in the Vorkosigan series, it worked fine as an entry point and made me fall in love with the series.

90ChelleBearss
Aug 4, 8:41am Top

Happy new thread!

91jnwelch
Aug 4, 9:03am Top

>86 DeltaQueen50: Good review of Castle of Oranto, Judy. Kudos to you for taking it on. I've had that concern that it would be an overripe Gothic hairpuller (overripe hair? that can't be right), but it sounds not that bad and worth giving a go.

92mstrust
Aug 4, 12:28pm Top

I'm so glad you enjoyed The Castle of Ortanto. There's so much going on in a rather slim book!

93DeltaQueen50
Aug 4, 1:33pm Top

Happy Sunday, everyone. We are in the midst of a holiday long weekend and the weather is cooperating beautifully. Sunny and warm, a perfect day for finding a comfy spot outside in the shade and enjoying some outdoor reading!

>89 mathgirl40: I am slowly working my way through the Vorkosigan series and so far I have loved every book! I was introduced to the series during a year long group read so I have been reading it in the chronological order.

>90 ChelleBearss: Thanks, Chelle. I hope you are enjoying a great holiday weekend.

>91 jnwelch: I found it a fun read, Joe, and, now I have a better understanding of why this was one of the books that influenced Catherine Morland from Northanger Abbey so strongly!

>92 mstrust: I thoroughly enjoyed all the melodrama and angst, Jennifer, all I needed was some popcorn!

94katiekrug
Aug 4, 4:59pm Top

*waving*

Hi Judy!

95DeltaQueen50
Aug 5, 11:17am Top

Hi Katie!

96DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 5, 11:28am Top

144. Closed Doors by Lisa O'Donnell - 4.2 ★
Category: Library List
August TIOLI #3: One of the Title Words Begins with the Letter "C"




Closed Doors by Lisa O’Donnell is set in an isolated community on a small island off the coast of Scotland during the early 1980s. The book unfolds through the eyes of eleven year old Michael Murray. Michael has learned to linger behind doors and listen to his family discuss things that they would rather he didn’t hear. When something terrible happens to his mother, he’s told that she fell down while running away from a flasher. While it becomes very obvious something far worse has happened, Michael’s mother doesn’t want anyone to know, and even though both this event and keeping it secret is tearing the family apart.

While O’Donnell captures the voice of Michael perfectly as he goes through the growing pains of early adolescence, I struggled a little more with finding the adults believable. The mother’s stubborn insistence on keeping her attack a secret felt overly contrived to me. This author excelled in her first book, The Death of Bees, but this second novel didn’t quite capture me in the same way although it raises some important questions as to how much children should be told about traumatic events. The family’s silence was difficult to accept when more attacks occurred.

Closed Doors was a better than average read and I feel that I am judging it a little harder because her first book was a such an excellent read. This book takes on tough subjects and filters than through a child’s vision and the result is a strongly written story of a family in crisis.

97NinieB
Aug 5, 1:07pm Top

I have just taken both of these as book bullets, and they're not my first today, either. I seem to be in an optimistic frame of mind!

98DeltaQueen50
Aug 6, 11:02am Top

>97 NinieB: I hope you enjoy the books, Ninie!

99DeltaQueen50
Aug 6, 1:48pm Top

The following is a meme that I lifted from Joe’s (jnwelch) thread this morning, he came to it by way of other LT members, who apparently came to it by way of Bookbub. I can’t resist a good book meme!

Reader’s Meme

1. The persons who helped me fall in love with reading were:

My mother who read to me every night and my grandmother as she bought books by the armful for us kids so we always had something new to look forward to.

2. One book I love to give as a gift is:

I try to match my book giving to the receiver’s taste but I have been know to pass out copies of Larry Watson and Larry McMurtry indiscriminately. I guess I like my Larrys!

3. If I could write like one author it would be

Kate Atkinson – great stories, wonderful characters, gorgeous writing.

4. One book I think deserves more attention is

The Secret Life of Bees by Lisa O’Donnell. This 2014 Alex Award winner blew me away and was my best read of 2016 yet I haven’t seen it garner a lot of attention here on Library Thing.

5. The friend(s) I always turn to for reading recommendations is/are

My LT Friends and my family keep my Kindles overloaded and my bookshelves stuffed!

6. What do you do about a book you're not liking

I am pretty stubborn and very rarely actually give up on a book. I get my revenge on bad books by ranting about them on Library Thing and warning others off them.

7. One book that absolutely shocked me was:

I wasn’t a fan of Virginia Woolf but then I read Mrs. Dalloway and became a fan so that was a good shock.

8. My favorite place to read is:

In the summer, outside on our terrace. In the winter curled up in my comfy recliner.

9. If I could read only one book for the rest of my life it’d be:

I would go insane with only one book to read the rest of my life. But if I had to pick one book, The Grapes of Wrath springs to mind – or could I be greedy and get a John Steinbeck omnibus?

10. The books I’m currently reading

The History of Tom Jones by Henry Fielding - listening
Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy by Mike Love - listening
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen – reading by installments
The Queen of Water of Laura Resau – from my bookshelf
The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares by Joyce Carol Oates – from my Kindle

100DeltaQueen50
Aug 6, 4:17pm Top

145. The Violent Bear It Away by Flannery O'Connor - 2.0 ★
Category: 1,001 Books List
August Reading Through Time: Philosophy & Religion
TIOLI #7: A Book by a Female Author Whose Gender is Immediately Apparent From Her Name




The Violent Bear It Away by Flannery O’Connor was originally published in 1960 and tells the story of Francis Marion Tarwater, a fourteen year old boy who is trying to escape the destiny his fanatically evangelist uncle has declared for him – the life of a prophet. I found this to be a very dark Southern Gothic story, with unlikable characters and strong religious themes.

I am puzzled by exactly what the author was trying to impart with this book. At first I thought this was a satire on religion, in particular the fundamentalists who live by a strict biblical code, but her view is so dark and brutal that I am not sure exactly what she was trying to say. Religious fanaticism makes me very uncomfortable, and this novel pushes the envelope beyond what I find acceptable. It is packed with symbolism and religious imagery and eventually verges into becoming a horror story with distorted characters and evil acts.

I did not understand this book or what it’s message is. I disliked the story and have decided to give up on trying to interpret it. Luckily it was a very short book so I was able to finish it but The Violent Bear It Away definitely wasn’t a book for me.

101mstrust
Aug 6, 7:06pm Top

To me, O'Connor was contrary. Her religious beliefs were a huge part of her life, yet she often wrote of religious people as brutal and unbalanced. I like her writing because it's pretty disturbing, which shouldn't have come from a devout, often house-bound spinster. She looked sweet but there was clearly a lot going on in her head. But not everyone's cup of tea, for sure.

102DeltaQueen50
Aug 6, 9:16pm Top

>101 mstrust: Disturbing is right, Jennifer! I think I was expecting the book to be satrical and therefore have more humor. I usually like dark stories but this was just so bleak and unpleasant that I couldn't find any redeeming qualities to it at all.

103RidgewayGirl
Edited: Aug 7, 9:40am Top

>99 DeltaQueen50: Oh, fun. Do you mind if I copy this?

And Flannery O'Connor's work is like a gunshot to the head. It's brutal stuff. I think she's brilliant, but no question that one needs to brace oneself ahead of time.

104DeltaQueen50
Aug 7, 2:25pm Top

>103 RidgewayGirl: Please help yourself to the meme, I hope lots of people copy it as I'll love reading through everyone's answers. Next time I read a Flannery O'Connor piece, I will be ready. I suspect I might have a better time with some of her short stories.

105mstrust
Aug 7, 5:33pm Top

>102 DeltaQueen50: I totally get it being too bleak for a lot of people. When I dislike an author that much, I just figure it's not gonna be a love match ;-)

106Familyhistorian
Aug 7, 7:54pm Top

I have never read anything by Flannery O'Connor but your review intrigued me so I went to my library site to see if they have any books by her. Flannery O'Connor: The Cartoons is now on my wish list there. Seriously, she wanted to be a cartoonist, not something I would think of after reading your discussion about her books.

107DeltaQueen50
Aug 7, 9:27pm Top

>105 mstrust: I usually like dark and grim stories, Jennifer, so I am fully prepared to give Flannery O'Connor another try.

>106 Familyhistorian: Wow, Meg, I would never have thought that Flannery O'Connor had a desire to be a cartoonist! I can't wait until your review.

108DeltaQueen50
Aug 7, 9:37pm Top

146. The Queen of Water by Laura Resau - 4.0 ★
Category: Armchair Travel
August Calendar Cat: Ecuador's Independance Day
TIOLI #9: Author's First Name Initial Comes Alphbetically Before Their Last Name Initial




The Queen of Water by Laura Resau is the story of Virginia, born in a small rural village in Ecuador, she lives with her large family in a small, earth-walled hovel. Her family are indigenas considered the lowest class of people and they work the fields for a family of mestizos, Spanish descendants. At seven years of age Virginia is taken from her family to become an unpaid servant to an upper class mestizo couple. Never having known much love or kindness, she grows up struggling always to better herself and find a way to escape from her dead-end life.

This was an amazing YA story that is based on a true story. The author collaborated with the real Virginia to bring this story to the rest of the world. Virginia spent eight years being held a virtual prisoner, denied an education, being beaten for the slightest of misdeeds, and finally having to avoid the man of the house who liked to put his hands on her and became more possessive and jealous of her as she blossomed into a very attractive young woman. Feeling like she doesn’t belong anywhere, Virginia finds the courage to break away, reinvents herself and becomes the person she was meant to be.

I really liked this story, and felt that Virginia came across as very real. Like all young girls she wasn’t perfect but she grew into her wisdom and strength as she learned how to take control and build a new life for herself. This is the second book that I have read by this author and will certainly be on the lookout for more.

109DeltaQueen50
Aug 9, 11:46am Top

147. The Draining Lake by Arnaldur Indridason - 4.0 ★
Category: Doing My ABCs
August AlphaKit: I
August SeriesCat: Set in a Country That I Do Not Live In
August TIOLI #1: Author's First and Last Names Start With a Vowel and End With a Consonant




The Draining Lake by Arnaldur Indridason is the fourth book in the Detective Erlendur series set in Iceland. The book opens with a skeleton being discovered as the waters of Lake Kleifarvatn recede. This skeleton is about 30 years old and had a hole punched into it’s skull indicating foul play. Now Erlendur and his partners are opening old Missing Person files from around 1970 to see if they can identify the victim. Slow and detailed work eventually leads them to the 1950’s and the Cold War.

The Draining Lake is another excellent entry into this series. We follow two time lines that eventually converge and the glimpses the author gives us of both the past and current Iceland are interesting. Erlendur is a lonely, middle aged, divorced man who is alienated from his own two children. He is haunted by the disappearance of his own younger brother in a blizzard many years ago, so feeling an affinity with the unidentified corpse, he stubbornly and methodically works this case that is based on international espionage, betrayals and murder.

110DeltaQueen50
Aug 9, 12:09pm Top

I've been trying to limit my LT time recently as I am experiencing a lot of pain in my right wrist when I spend too much time typing and scrolling. Then to make matters worse I seem to be experiencing some arthritus pain in my left hand's little finger. Getting old sucks!

111thornton37814
Aug 9, 12:20pm Top

>109 DeltaQueen50: That's a series I need to get back to reading. I've only read one--and I think it was #2 instead of #1.

112clue
Aug 9, 9:31pm Top

>110 DeltaQueen50: Ain't it so?? I have developed arthritis (self diagnosed) in my lower thumb joints. I really think its from holding books because they hurt the most when I hold larger hardbacks. It's grieves me but I'm really thankful for trade paperbacks and my Kindle!

113Jackie_K
Aug 10, 10:52am Top

>110 DeltaQueen50: >112 clue: I find holding hardback books harder now - I had De Quervain's Tenosynovitis (kind of like carpal tunnel, but affecting the wrist and thumb) in my right hand after I had my baby, had steroid injections and eventually surgery which fixed that, and then a year or so later developed repetitive strain injury in the same hand, so have to wear a wrist splint pretty much all the time now. I find spending a lot of time scrolling and typing really painful, so if it gets too painful then I have to limit my time on the keyboard. Although I have found that getting a split ergonomic keyboard and joystick mouse helpful. What with the painful wrist and the worsening eyesight, all I can say is e-readers are a godsend!

114DeltaQueen50
Aug 10, 11:41am Top

>111 thornton37814: My problem is that there are too many good mystery/police procedural series that I want to follow. This one keeps getting put on the back burner, but luckily it fit a TIOLI challenge this month.

>112 clue: & >113 Jackie_K: For me, scrolling is the worst. It really inflames my wrist, and I have been re-cataloging all my Kindle books recently which required a fair amount of scrolling. As for my little finger, I'm beginning to think there's something more than arthritis involved. It's swollen and turning slightly black and blue - can one break a finger and not be aware of it? I hate to go and spend hours and hours in the ER but if it doesn't improve over the weekend, I'll go and see the doctor next week.

115Jackie_K
Aug 10, 11:47am Top

>114 DeltaQueen50: Ouch, yes that might well be an issue if it's bruising. I hope it calms down soon and it can be treated easily.

116DeltaQueen50
Aug 10, 11:49am Top

148. The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares by Joyce Carol Oates - 4.5 ★
Category: Let's Eat
August TIOLI #3: One of the Title Worlds Begins With The Letter "C"




The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares by Joyce Carol Oates is a collection of short stories that are guaranteed to give you the chills. After just a few pages it becomes obvious that this author not only know about the stuff of nightmares, she can write about it as well. Her creative stories in this collection touch on our own worst fears and vulnerabilities and, I suspect, will haunt the reader for some time.

The first story, The Corn Maiden is the centerpiece and sets the tone for the rest of the book. This tale of an evil child who with the help of her minions kidnaps a younger classmate is creepy, strange and scary. Many of these stories feature children or siblings who are seeking revenge or taking sibling rivalry to a whole new level. Whether it is a step child delivering revenge for past misdeeds, a young child who cannot accept a new baby in the family, or a brother trying to eliminate his twin by poison, these tales are dark, claustrophobic and chilling.

While some of these stories are straight out frightening, others are strange, creepy and suspenseful. If these tales are showcasing Oates’ nightmares, then what an unusual mind this author has and how lucky are we that she shares her nightmares with her readers. If you are wanting to take a walk on the dark side than I would suggest giving The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares a try.

117RidgewayGirl
Aug 10, 12:23pm Top

Yes, JCO does creepy better than anyone else!

118BLBera
Aug 10, 1:38pm Top

Hi Judy - I haven't read Flannery O'Connor's novels, but I love her short stories. She writes about bizarre situations. One thing she says is that in each of her stories, there is "a moment of grace." I have a lot of fun with my students trying to find it. I do like her dark humor, too. I'll have to give her novel a try at some point.

119NinieB
Aug 10, 2:37pm Top

>114 DeltaQueen50: Yikes! Just this week, one of my co-workers thought she had sprained her finger, but an x-ray showed that in fact she had chipped the bone. She now has a little tiny splint that she has to wear for eight weeks.

120clue
Aug 10, 8:24pm Top

>114 DeltaQueen50: I think it would be very possible to break a finger and not know it. I have a Dr. friend who didn't realize she had broken an ankle and walked on it, or tried to, for several days thinking it was a sprain.

121DeltaQueen50
Aug 11, 12:05pm Top

>117 RidgewayGirl: I am looking forward to reading more from this author!

>118 BLBera: And I will have to give her short stories a try at some point, I'm thinking that they will be of what I am looking for with this author.

>119 NinieB: & >120 clue: Yes, I think I had better phone the doctor on Monday and go and see her about my finger. Luckily, since I have completed my cataloging my wrist has settled down and is much better.

122DeltaQueen50
Aug 11, 12:18pm Top

149. Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy by Mike Love - 3.5 ★
Category: Non-Fiction
2019 PopSugar Challenge: A Book Written by a Musician
August TIOLI #2: Rolling Challenge - Who, What, When, Where & How




Before I fell in love with the Beatles, I remember listening to the Beach Boys and have been a fan since their first record hit the radio airwaves in the early 1960s. I remember when they were cool, then when they were not, and finally, when they were designated “America’s Band”. Although I know and love their music and recall some of their headlines like the connection to the Manson family and Brian Wilson’s struggles with drugs and mental health issues, I really didn’t know very much about what make this band tick.

I decided to listen to a recording of Good Vibrations: My Life as a Beach Boy, written and read by Mike Love, one of the original Beach Boys and a family member. This book gives the reader an understanding of the family dynamics and how the group got it’s start. I didn’t realize that in later years, they have imploded and suits and counter-suits are flying about. It is a shame that this group of three brothers, a cousin, and a friend couldn’t find the harmony in real life that they so easily achieved in their music.

I found Good Vibrations a mixed read with some of it very interesting and some it straight out boring. This is Mike Love’s version so I take it all with a grain of salt but the basics about the dysfunction of the group with the fights over creative rights, personal betrayals, the stress of having to constantly get the next album out, and the grind of touring felt honest and real. I don’t really care to investigate any further into what broke the Beach Boys, but I still love their music.

123thornton37814
Aug 11, 4:18pm Top

>116 DeltaQueen50: Sounds like a good Halloween/October read.

Regarding your wrist, I own a pair of wrist braces. I haven't needed them for a long while, but my repetitive stress injury seemed to come from the way I held the wheel while driving and was aggravated by typing or anything using the wrist. I think I'd just lapsed into a lazy posture on the wheel for long trips and then kept doing it for day to day driving. I think forcing myself to wear the braces while driving even after the wrists were better helped me break the lazy habit.

124ronincats
Aug 11, 10:13pm Top

Glad your wrists are a bit better--yes, check on the finger. It could just be jammed, but could also be broken and need PT to get back to normal.

125LisaMorr
Aug 12, 1:49pm Top

As usual, catching up on this thread and your previous one leads to many BBs! The Sultan's Wife, Moon at Nine, Blue Highways, A Guide to the Birds of East Africa, Dark Chapter and The Corn Maiden all go on the list, and a reminder to get to Adam Bede sooner rather than later.

Happy belated thingaversary and congrats on the book haul - my 11th is next week and I need to start considering what I'll get!

And sorry to hear your husband needs surgery and you're experiencing some issues - good luck to you both. Certainly happy to be on this side of the grass, but aging is no fun!

126DeltaQueen50
Aug 12, 4:16pm Top

>123 thornton37814: Lori, I am going to look into getting a wrist brace even if I just wear it when I am going to be on the computer for long spells.

>124 ronincats: I am planning on calling my doctor tomorrow, Roni. It is feeling a little better but still hurts if I move it in certain ways and typing with it is impossible!

>125 LisaMorr: I love sending out book bullets since I am the victim of them all too often here! And it's definitely true that old age is not for wimps!

127DeltaQueen50
Aug 12, 4:22pm Top

Instead of following up with my doctor today, we spend it dealing with the car dealer as we are still trying to get the trunk of our car working. For the last little while it has simply been tied closed and we haven't been able to use it all all. I don't know what the difficulty is, you would think that getting a trunk to close wouldn't be all that hard even with the cameras and computers that today's car's have. Today it's going to the dealer's body shop so hopefully they will be able to do something. We have been wanting to go on a road trip since May but can't see outselves travelling without a trunk. They now have the car for a couple of days and if they finally get it fixed, I will be planning a road trip for September.

128katiekrug
Aug 12, 4:29pm Top

>127 DeltaQueen50: - Road trip! I hear Calgary is lovely in September (says she who will be in Calgary in late September...) ;-)

129DeltaQueen50
Aug 12, 4:30pm Top

150. Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig - 3.6 ★
Category: From My Shelves
2019 PopSugar Challenge: About a Family
August TIOLI #10: The Name Rick or Ricky is used as a Character




Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig is the story of an autistic girl who needs to find her forever home and learn to let go of the past. At the age of nine Ginny was taken from her abusive mother, Gloria, and now, at fourteen, is starting to feel safe and loved by her adoptive parents, Brian and Maura. Maura is expecting a child which triggers memories in Ginny, that of her own baby doll and how she once loved and protected it.

Ginny becomes more and more anxious about her baby doll, but everyone assumes that she is talking about an actual doll so they don’t understand why she is increasingly getting more and more troublesome. By the time Maura’s baby arrives, they are afraid that Ginny may harm the new baby, and start to make the difficult decision to send Ginny away. The story is told by Ginny in her own words and the reader becomes immersed in her closed, careful and claustrophobic world. Everything must be black or white for Ginny, she doesn’t understand shades of grey.

This story alternates between being heartwarming and heartbreaking. Dealing with Ginny is difficult but I thought the story got a little far-fetched when none of the adults in her world, even her therapist, actually listened to her more carefully. Even once it was discovered that the baby doll was Ginny’s real baby sister, little effort was made to understand Ginny’s dilemma. This was a very good story that unfortunately was about 100 pages too long causing the read to become quite tiresome at times.

130DeltaQueen50
Aug 13, 11:28am Top

>128 katiekrug: Katie, we had planned a trip last September that we ended up cancelling when my husband was taken to hospital so we may try to recreate our plans for that. Also my birthday is in the first week of October and my eldest daughter has made arrangements for us to go and stay in her cottage at Parksville on Vancouver Island which I will connect with a visit to my family - all we need is a car to pack up!

131mstrust
Aug 13, 11:35am Top

Judy, I'm wishing you a quick recovery for your wrist and thumb. And your car trunk!
>116 DeltaQueen50: It's been a few years since I read JCO, and that sounds like a good one. BB for me!

132DeltaQueen50
Aug 13, 4:11pm Top

>131 mstrust: Thanks, Jennifer. I am excited to read more of JCO!

133DeltaQueen50
Aug 13, 4:17pm Top

151. Shift Omnibus by Hugh Howey - 2.5 ★
Category: One Word Titles
August TBRCat: Planned to Read Right Away but It's Been Over A Year ...
TIOLI #2: Rolling Challenge Based on Who, What, When, Where and How




The Shift Omnibus Edition by Hugh Howey is a trilogy that is a sequel to his bestselling Wool. I read and loved Wool and was excited to finally be reading these next books. Unfortunately, I really didn’t care for Shift at all. The time sequences were are jumbled around and just when the reader would get to a good part, wham, the story shifted to another time. This took me totally out of the story and after a number of these time shifts, I really didn’t care anymore about any of the characters or the stories they were telling.

This three volume book is over 600 pages and believe me I felt as trapped as the residents of the various Silos. The characters were lame and dreary, the plot had huge holes, and it was painfully obvious when the author liked a phrase as he would then repeat it over and over. Why did I finish this? Well, I kept hoping that something would pull the various story lines together and give me some kind of semblance to the original story. This never happened and now I feel that spending so much time on this was a complete waste of time.

I also have this author’s Dust on my shelves which would once more place me into this claustrophobic world of the silos but, at this point I am not sure if I will bother to read it. What started out with such great promise with Wool really went downhill with Shift and this book has been my biggest disappointment so far this year.

134katiekrug
Aug 13, 4:35pm Top

>133 DeltaQueen50: - Oooh, good to know. I also enjoyed Wool and have Shift on my Kindle, but I think I'll just let it languish there...

135dudes22
Aug 14, 7:17am Top

I had read Wool back in June from a BB I got from you and liked it well enough but wasn't sure I wanted to read more. You review has convinced me not to bother.

136BLBera
Aug 14, 11:41am Top

I like the Beach Boys' music as well, Judy, but I don't think I'm interested in reading a bio. Great comments - I think I know all I need to about them. :)

>133 DeltaQueen50: This sounds good. Onto the list it goes.

Good luck with your hand injury. I hope your trunk gets fixed. I think cars used to be easier to fix before everything was run by computers.

137DeltaQueen50
Aug 14, 12:05pm Top

>134 katiekrug: I find it hard to believe that the same author wrote both Wool and Shift! This was a read that I was looking forward to, but it really sucked!

>135 dudes22: I would agree that you should definitely give Shift a miss, Betty.

>136 BLBera: Beth, I really got a strong vibe (if you will) that Mike Love was trying to get his side of the story out. Apparently Brian Wilson's bio came out a few months before his. I suspect the truth about all their problems lie somewhere in the middle.

The car saga drags on. They have ordered another latch (the third one!!) and it is coming from Toronto so at this point we won't get the car back until at least the end of the week.

138DeltaQueen50
Aug 14, 9:08pm Top

152. Rose's Last Summer by Margaret Millar
Category: Vintage Crime
TIOLI #5: Author Acknowledges Another Author in the Dedication




Rose’s Last Summer by Margaret Millar is a fun mystery novel that is about a faded actress’s death and the chaos that she leaves behind her. With her best days behind her, Rose bids adieu to her only friends, a noisy landlady and her psychologist and announces that she’s off to a new job as a housekeeper. Suspicions are aroused when she turns up dead in the garden of a wealthy doll manufacturer despite the coroner’s finding of a natural death.

Something strange is going on, and when another older lady disappears and there are threats of kidnapping and demands for ransom money as well as long lost relatives showing up, it is up to Detective Greer and psychologist Frank to get to the bottom of this complicated case.

Originally published in 1952, Rose’s Last Summer wasn’t quite as clever as I had been led to believe as I wasn’t surprised by any of the “twists” or the predictable outcome but it was a light, whimsical read perfect to kick back with on a warm summer’s day.

139msf59
Aug 15, 6:31am Top

Sweet Thursday, Judy. I hope you are having a good week. I see the books are treating you well. Mine, are too!

140DeltaQueen50
Aug 15, 9:37pm Top

>139 msf59: I am enjoying most of the books that I am reading these days, Mark. Right now I am over the moon with Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees. For some reason I have avoided Barbara Kingsolver thinking that I wouldn't like her writing but I am absolutely loving this one and now I am looking forward to more of her books.

141DeltaQueen50
Aug 15, 9:43pm Top

We got our car back today and the trunk works! I came home from picking it up and immediately got to work planning and booking a road trip for us. We are planning on heading out in early September travelling east and visiting friends and family along the way. Our turn around point will be the Cypress Hills in the south eastern corner of Alberta where the elevations changes the geographical landscape from flat, treeless praire to rolling, forest covered hills.

Then we will be heading over to Vancouver Island on the 30th of September for a stay at our elder daughter's beach cabin, then my husband will head home and I will go to Victoria for a visit with my Mom and the rest of the family.

After being housebound for the last few months we are both looking forward to hitting the road!

142NinieB
Aug 15, 10:29pm Top

>141 DeltaQueen50: Did you know that Wallace Stegner spent part of his childhood in the Cypress Hills, and wrote a memoir/history about the region? Wolf Willow: A History, a Story, and a Memory of the Last Plains Frontier

143DeltaQueen50
Aug 15, 10:34pm Top

>142 NinieB: Thanks, I didn't know that but now that I do, I just checked and it's available at Amazon for the Kindle so I may just have to treat myself. It would be a great read to take on my trip.

144NinieB
Aug 15, 10:41pm Top

I started reading it a few years ago when I first got it, then life intervened and I got sidetracked. But I did enjoy the part that I read. Your reading it will be a good reason for me to pull out my copy and finally give it a proper read.

145DeltaQueen50
Aug 15, 10:49pm Top

>144 NinieB: Well, I resisted temptation for all of one minute and Wolf Willow: A History, a Story, and a Memory of the Last Plains Frontier is now on my kindle! This will definitely be read next month.

146NinieB
Aug 16, 7:20am Top

>146 NinieB: I had never heard of the Cypress Hills until I had picked up Wolf Willow, and hadn't heard of them since then until you mentioned them. Stegner's Angle of Repose was a powerful novel; I'm looking forward to reading more by him.

147Carmenere
Aug 16, 9:03am Top

Happy, yet belated, new thread, Judy! You're clearly having an outstanding summer of reading! Your road trip sounds awesome. Will the trees be changing colors for you?

148DeltaQueen50
Aug 16, 11:34am Top

>146 NinieB: Stenger has long been on my radar, so I am looking forward to reading him.

>147 Carmenere: Hi Lynda. I think it will be a little early for the leaves to be showing color, but maybe at the higher elevations in the Rocky Mountains we will see some color.

149DeltaQueen50
Aug 16, 11:45am Top

153. Kieron Smith, Boy by James Kelman - 3.3 ★
Category: The 1,001 Book List
August 1,001 Books To Read Group Read
August TIOLI #9: Author's First Initial Comes Alphabetically Before the Last Initial




Told through the thoughts and with the voice of one young Scottish lad, Kieron Smith, Boy by James Kelman is in fact, made very distinctive by the Glaswegian dialect that Kieron uses. For me, this made the book a little more difficult but also gave it an authenticity that drew me in. Unfortunately after 300 or so pages this ‘stream of consciousness’ style started to wear thin and I still had another 100 or so pages to go. While the boy’s voice was truly authentic it was also realistic enough that you soon realized that youngsters of this age don’t have much of interest to talk about.

Kieron is growing up in one of Glasgow’s poorer neighbourhoods. His parents are difficult to get a handle on as in Kieron’s eyes, his dad is always behind the newspaper and his mother is always watching the television. His battles with his older brother did bring a smile to my face having been in Kieron’s position with an older sister who always thought she was in the right. The story flows with the day-to-day tedium of Kieron’s observations that carry him from about age 5 through to 13.

A book that started out well but wasn’t able to keep from fading into boredom, Kieron Smith, Boy felt too long for a book where nothing really happens.

150DeltaQueen50
Aug 17, 6:25pm Top

154. The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver - 5.0 ★
Category: Let's Eat!
August TIOLI #14: Morphy's Challenge - Read a Book With a Food Item in the Title




I have just finished listening to The Bean Trees written by Barbara Kingsolver and read by C. J. Critt and I now have a bookish crush on Ms. Kingsolver. Why oh why, I ask myself have I avoided this author over the years? Someone in the past made disparaging remarks and I unfortunately believed them. Now I am anxious to read more by this author. The Bean Trees is about feisty Marietta Greer, who escapes the backwaters of Kentucky to find herself a new life. When her car breaks down in Taylorville, Illinois, she chooses to rename herself Taylor. When she reaches Oklahoma and has problems with her ‘55 Volkswagen bug, she ends up having a baby placed in her arms by a sad Cherokee woman. Taylor calls the baby Turtle as she clings so tightly to her new mother.

I loved this story of how Taylor and Turtle find a new place in Arizona for themselves and surround themselves with good friends that become like family. The author uses humor and whimsy in generous amounts but also doesn’t shy away from dark truths and real life. As Taylor embraces the responsibility of motherhood and comes to love the state of Arizona, the reader is treated to a wonderful story of affirmation, risk-taking, commitment and love.

Originally published in 1988, this book, with it’s references to political and human rights issues surrounding illegal immigrants is very relevant to the border situation today. The Bean Trees is a touching, funny and humane story that was raised to excellence by the fantastic narration of C. J. Critt.

151clue
Aug 17, 6:41pm Top

>150 DeltaQueen50: I have this on my reread list because I read it several years ago and want to read Pigs in Heaven, it's sequel. One of my favorites is The Lacuna but I think most people liked The Poisonwood Bible most. I should try it again I guess because I didn't like it all that much, probably read it at the wrong time.

152Familyhistorian
Aug 17, 7:39pm Top

Good to hear that your car is finally fixed and you will be able to get on the road, Judy.

153japaul22
Aug 17, 8:35pm Top

>150 DeltaQueen50: I also waited way too long to start reading Barbara Kingsolver's books. I read Poisonwood Bible first and thought it was excellent (it's also on the 1001 books list). I've since read about 5 of her books and I've liked them all.

154dudes22
Aug 18, 7:30am Top

My favorite is her non-fiction book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life which she wrote after her family moved from Arizona to Virginia and decided to try living off the land for a year. I still have The Lacuna on my TBR pile, but have liked others of hers that I read. I only have two listed here on LT so I must have read others before I started tracking on LT.

155DeltaQueen50
Aug 18, 11:55am Top

>151 clue: As soon as I finished The Bean Trees I went to Audible and got myself a copy of Pigs in Heaven. Not sure when I will fit it into my reading but it will mostly likely be my next Kingsolver.

>152 Familyhistorian: Thanks, Meg. We are really looking forward to getting away since it's been quite a while since we were able to get away on a road trip.

>153 japaul22: Good to hear, that you liked The Poisonwood Bible as I already have that one on my shelves. I expect it will be next after Pigs in Heaven.

>154 dudes22: Ha, another one to add to my list.

156DeltaQueen50
Aug 18, 12:08pm Top

155. Confessions of a Pagan Nun by Kate Horsley - 3.8 ★
Category: Out of the Past
August Reading Thru Time: Religion and Philosophy
August TIOLI #14: Author's Last Name is Longer Than the First




Confessions of a Pagan Nun by Kate Horsley is a rather grim story set in the 6th century Ireland as Christianity is slowly overtaking the pagan religion. Gwynneve is serving as a nun and is cloistered in a stone cell at St. Bridgit’s convent. She should be transcribing sacred texts but instead she is secretly recording her life story of how she was raised as a pagan, trained as a druid and eventually “converted” to Christianity. This is a story of a hard life with constant struggles against the injustices of the time.

Well crafted and researched, the author writes about this time period with authority, yet she manages to infuse her words with a poetic feeling. While this is a grim story about a woman struggling in a difficult time, it is interesting and gives the reader a strong picture of the Celtic culture being overtaken and changed by Christianity. Not a long novel, but one that explores both the spirituality and philosophy of a country that is being changed by a new religion.

157Jackie_K
Aug 18, 1:33pm Top

>150 DeltaQueen50: I read Pigs in Heaven and loved it, it worked fine as a standalone as I'd not read The Bean Trees before. I must admit though that I tried to read The Poisonwood Bible twice but just found it so bleak I never managed to get very far with it.

158msf59
Edited: Aug 18, 8:59pm Top

Happy Sunday, Judy. Great review of The Bean Trees. Thumb! I loved the book too and I hope this kicks off a long, affair with Kingsolver. I also loved Pigs in Heaven.

159DeltaQueen50
Aug 18, 10:45pm Top

>157 Jackie_K: I think it was my sister, who hated The Poisonwood Bible, that initially put me off of Barbara Kingsolver, but I am hoping that my opinion is different from hers.

>158 msf59: Thanks for the thumb, Mark. I love that even at my ripe old age, I can still be so pleasantly surprised by books!

160ronincats
Aug 18, 11:00pm Top

I am waiting with bated breath to hear your reaction to The Face in the Frost, Judy. Not a perfect book, but one that has wormed its way deep into my heart.

161VioletBramble
Aug 19, 9:23am Top

>150 DeltaQueen50: Great review of The Bean Trees. I've had that one sitting on my shelf for a number of years and never seem to get around to reading it. The Poisonwood Bible is the only Kingsolver I've read so far. I loved it.
I'm also gonna take a BB for Confessions of a Pagan Nun.

162DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 19, 11:11am Top

>160 ronincats: You don't have to wait too long, Roni, I polished off this little gem yesterday. I loved it, especially the way the author uses language.

>161 VioletBramble: I hope you find Confessions of a Pagan Nun interesting. I was very impressed. It looks like The Poisonwood Bible leaves mixed reactions - people either seem to love it or not like it at all.

163DeltaQueen50
Aug 19, 11:25am Top

156. The Face in the Frost by John Bellairs - 4.2 ★
Category: Book Bullets - Roni
August TBR Cat: Planned to read immediately upon purchase but it's still on my shelf a couple of years later
August TIOLI #2: Rolling Challenge - Who, What, When, Where & How




The Face in the Frost is by author John Bellairs who specialized in writing spooky tales for young readers. This story totally enchanted me with it’s magic, humor and adventure. The main character, Prospero and his best friend Roger Bacon are elderly wizards in a fantasy land. When a series of supernatural manifestations begin to haunt Propero’s home, the two friends set out on a quest to discover the source of these evil occurrences. On their journey they encounter ghosts, wild beasts, and nightmares of all types, yet these wizards fight back with their magic staffs and chanted spells. They never give up, and their humor never deserts them.

Although this book is for children, and the plot is fairly simple, this author has a wonderful way with words, mixing whimsical fairy tale language and strange inventive wizard words into the flow of the narrative. There isn’t much in the way of violence instead the author creates a sense of danger by bending reality into nightmare scenes and keeping our two wizards in a constant state of dread.

A very short novel of less than 200 pages, The Face in the Frost was a delightful way to spend an afternoon and introduced me to a couple of very lovable wizards. The writing is a blend of dark Gothic and fanciful lightness that at times is spooky and at others silly. I wish I had read this when I was young because I know I would have been totally caught up in this magical tale.

164BLBera
Aug 19, 3:46pm Top

I am a Kingsolver fan as well, Judy. I've been meaning to reread The Bean Trees; it's been years and I really loved it. My favorites, I think, are Animal Dreams and Flight Behavior. You do have a lot of good reading ahead.

Hooray for a road trip and a working trunk!

165DeltaQueen50
Aug 19, 9:47pm Top

>165 DeltaQueen50: Hi Beth, I am just about to head over to your thread to thank you for letting me know about the updated Little Women graphic novel. I really enjoyed it!

166DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 19, 10:06pm Top

157. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy by RayTerciero and Illustrated by Bre Indigo - 4.2 ★
Category: Overflow
August TIOLI #5: Author Acknowledges Another Author in the Dedication




Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy by Ray Terciero and Bre Indigo is a graphic novel that retells the classic story of Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. In this version the March sisters are from a blended family with Meg and her father being black, Jo and her mother white while the younger girls, Beth and Amy, are of mixed heritage. They live in a brownstone in Brooklyn, the mother is a nurse while the father serves in the military and is deployed in the Middle East.

Many of the details of the original book are included but in an updated manner and readers of the original will certainly recognize the girls from their personalities, but their problems and inner feelings have been given new twists more in line with today’s young women, from concerns about their future careers to dealing with racist bullying and their sexual identity. The story is enhanced by the letters and e-mails that the girls send their father which allows the reader access to their inner thoughts.

I thought this was a wonderful update on one of my favorite stories. The artwork is colorful and attention grabbing, and the story works well in it’s contemporary setting. My only quibble is that all the important issues that were raised were quickly dealt with and smoothed over which simplified the story somewhat. I would love to see a sequel at some point to see how the girls progress.

167mstrust
Aug 20, 11:52am Top

>163 DeltaQueen50: I new-to-me Bellairs!? BB'd, and thanks for reviewing that.

168DeltaQueen50
Aug 20, 11:56am Top

>167 mstrust: You're welcome, Jennifer. The Face in the Frost was a book bullet for me so I am happy to be passing the "hit" along!

169DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 20, 10:47pm Top

158. Origin by Jessica Khoury - 3.4 ★
Category: Young At Heart
August TIOLI #9: The Author's First Name Initial Comes Alphabetically Before the Last Name Initial




Origin by Jessica Khoury is a YA story set in a secret enclave deep in the Amazonian jungle where a group of scientists have perfected their exploration of immorality. Hidden away from the world, their specimen has reached the age of seventeen. She has inexhaustible stamina, a body impervious to sickness or injury and super fast reflexes, but Pia is more than a science project, she is a living, breathing girl who longs to break free of the restrictions that surround her. When a storm causes a break in the fence surrounding the compound, Pia ventures out on her own. She meets a boy, Eio, and with his help and the help of a new female scientist, Pia learns more about the secrets and tragedies that led to her existence.

Origin is a well paced story that makes inventive use of the philosophy and science of immortality. It is a YA book which meant that the characters were not as well developed as I would have liked and the relationship between Pia and Eio was a little too full of teen angst for me which made it rather unbelievable. Obviously this is a book written for a young teenage audience and probably would most likely be enjoyed by them. Origin is the first of a trilogy and since I have the other two on my shelves, I will probably continue on at some point.

170DeltaQueen50
Aug 20, 7:56pm Top

What a strange day. We went across the border and were planning on meeting my brother-in-law and his wife for lunch, but somehow the wires got crossed and we ended up at the Olive Garden in Bellingham, and they were in the Olive Garden in Mount Vernon - 30 miles down the road. I guess when my husband told his brother that we were coming "down" his brother thought we meant Mt. Vernon not just coming down over the border. On top of that, the border lineup were crazy today and it took us 2 1/2 hours to cross over to the States and then about 1 hr. and 15 min. to come back. Well, at least it got us out of the apartment for a day!

171DeltaQueen50
Aug 21, 9:58pm Top

159. Collusion by Stuart Neville - 4.5 ★
Category: Doing My ABCs
August AlphaKit: N
August SeriesCat: Set in a country that I do not live in
August TIOLI #3: One of the Title Words Begins with the Letter "C"




Collusion by Stuart Neville is the second book in his Belfast series of novels. This one is driven by the events from the first book and has D. I. Jack Lennon rushing to unravel the conspiracy that involves collusion among Loyalists, IRA members, and law enforcement in order to rescue his former girlfriend and their daughter who are being used as bait to draw out the mysterious Gerry Fegan.

This story is just as well written and just as violent as the first book was, with a merciless paid assassin going about his gruesome work of silencing all witnesses to the bloodbath that closed out the first book. Marie McKenna and her young daughter are lured out of hiding and Gerry Fegan and Jack Lennon end up working together to save them.

This is a thriller that totally works, delivering terrifying but believable chills in this riveting and tragic story of revenge and redemption. I am looking forward to continuing on with this series as there were enough loose threads left at the end of Collusion to leave me wondering what is going to happen next.

172DeltaQueen50
Edited: Aug 22, 11:07pm Top

160. Jackie's Girl by Kathy McKeon - 3.7 ★
Category: Non-Fiction
August TIOLI #17: Published by a 2 Word Publishing Company




In 1964 Kathy McKeon went to a job interview at a luxury apartment on 5th Avenue, New York. Instead of a difficult interview she spent some time time a young boy, John, and his dog. His mother was charmed by how well Kathy and John got on, and immediately hired Kathy to work to her. The mother was Jacqueline Kennedy. In Jackie’s Girl, Kathy writes about the years (1964 – 1976) that she spent with Jacqueline Kennedy/Onassis and her children. They developed a close relationship and Kathy was there for the milestones that happened during these years.

Jacqueline Kennedy comes across as a caring mother and someone who was very good to work for. If you were let into her inner circle, her kindness and generosity ensured that you felt part of the “family”. This isn’t a tell-all book that exposes scandals and secrets but it is the story of a young Irish girl who is hired to clean, mend and look after Jackie’s clothes and to fill in for the governess yet finds herself establishing a friendship that would last a lifetime. You can still get a sense of how protective Ms. McKeon is toward the Kennedys but overall this is a pleasant memoir filled with interesting anecdotes.

173DeltaQueen50
Today, 12:43pm Top

161. Huck Out West by Robert Coover - 4.2 ★
Category: Saddle Up!
August RandomCat: Back to School
August TIOLI #12: Author Has A College or University Connection




In Huck Out West author Robert Coover continues the story of Huckleberry Finn by following him on his Western journeys. We learn that Huck has been having adventures, among them was working as a Pony Express rider, hunting buffalo, guiding wagon trains and living with the Lakota Sioux. At times Huckleberry is with his childhood friend, Tom Sawyer. While these characters are much like they were as youngsters with Huck having retained his decency and innocence, the crafty, clever and self-serving Tom Sawyer has lost his charm is now a manipulative and rather untrustworthy scoundrel. Many other characters from the two books about these boys make an appearance as well.

Although these characters are familiar, the author’s purpose seems less in continuing the legend of Huckleberry than in exposing the truth behind how and why the incoming Americans ignored the previous treaties that had been set with the Lakota over the Black Hills. Once gold had been discovered there, the Americans quickly sought to discard the treaties, take control and remove or murder the Lakota. We now know that these depredations eventually ended up in the confrontation at the Little Bighorn in 1876. The book reminded me a great deal of Little Big Man by Thomas Berger, as Huck wanders around and is involved in incidents with the Indians, bandits, immigrants, prospectors and the army. Although not specifically named, there is a long haired general that Huck calls General Hard Ass that shows up a number of times and every time he appears, the news is not good for Huckleberry.

As the drifter Huckleberry Finn continues his search for freedom, Huck Out West serves as both a homage and a sequel to Mark Twain’s original work as well as a satire about the cost of America’s determination to extend it’s borders. I believe that Mark Twain would have enjoyed this book, I know that I certainly did.

174DeltaQueen50
Today, 9:43pm Top

162. Stone Spring by Stephen Baxter - 4.0 ★
Category: Out of the Past
August SfffKit: Alternative History
August TIOLI #2: Rolling Challenge Based on Who, What, When, Where or How




Stone Spring by Stephen Baxter is the first in the Northlands trilogy where the author speculates about the distant past and, in this version, changes the outcome so that the land bridge that connected Great Britain to Europe is not sunk under the sea but instead due to a system of dikes and dams, holds back the oncoming oceans. The time period is the Mesolithic period, circa 8000 B.C. , and much of the earth’s waters are locked into glaciers, the oceans are lower and land that is buried today is exposed and has people living on it. As the glaciers melted, the oceans rose and covered much of this land.

The story follows a group of people who live in this area, their way of life is threatened by the rising of the oceans and a series of tsunamis which are vividly depicted in the story. Although I found this book at some 500 plus pages a little long, the story was interesting as the people of Etxelur struggle to save their homeland from sinking. There is more to the story than just building dams as the story is centered around one prehistoric girl who envisions a better world for her tribe. There are power struggles, wars between various tribes and revenge among family members which brought a lot of action to the story and, while there were a few parts that required me to stretch my imagination a little to far, for the most part I enjoyed this story and look forward to continuing on with the trilogy.

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