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Roman road system

Ancient History

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1LolaWalser
Sep 9, 2010, 4:52pm Top

Can anyone suggest a road atlas of the Roman empire? Ideally, something containing global, regional and urban maps; also ideally, showing the chronological changes, up to our times? Which ones were abandoned, which overlaid/still in use etc. I'm dreaming of diagrams with superimposable transparent pages, but anything with lots of maps will do.

2Mr.Durick
Edited: Sep 9, 2010, 5:27pm Top

My first thought was the 45036907::Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, but it shows, apparently, only major routes. It does not, so far as I noticed in my skimming, have any urban maps. It could prove to be a resource if you have to write your own book.

I don't believe that there is any reason this touchstone should not work. CURSE THE TOUCHSTONES

Good luck,

Robert

3Feicht
Sep 9, 2010, 11:59pm Top

Wow that would be great, but I don't know if anything like that exists. I know there are maps you can get that show the major routes' roads, like in the Barrington Atlas, but aside from that, I don't know of anything.

4BarkingMatt
Sep 10, 2010, 2:24am Top

Well, in a way there is in the Tabula Peutingeriana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabula_Peutingeriana). But it's hard to interpret.

5AurelArkad
Sep 12, 2010, 8:36am Top

A piecemeal solution, I know, but for the UK there is their Ordnance Survey Map of Roman Britain, and 'tis likely that most countries wholly or partly within the boundaries of the former Roman Empire have produced maps of their sections of the Roman roading system.

Of course, a knowledge of rather more languages than just Latin and English might be required to make the fullest sense of such maps.

Apologies that my input here is a bit like those old-fashioned recipe books for rabbit pie that started by advising you to sharpen your knife and be prepared for some fast outdoor running....

‘Aurélien Arkadiusz’

6alaudacorax
Sep 12, 2010, 9:06am Top

But then you'd have burned off more calories chasing the bunny than you'd get from eating it - you'd starve. There's an easier way. You need a brick, a lettuce leaf and some pepper. Put the brick outside the bunny hole, put the lettuce on the brick, put the pepper on the lettuce. The rabbit comes out, sees the lettuce, has a quick sniff before eating, sneezes violently, knocks himself unconscious on the brick. Simple.

#4 - I really, really want one of those (drool). Only trouble is that I'd have to put it above door height as it would run round more than two of my walls in here.

7AurelArkad
Sep 12, 2010, 10:58pm Top

LOL Hmmm, if we were wearing iron-studded legionary sandals on a rocky Roman Road I suspect we'd find it more energy-efficient to hire a fleet-footed local tribesman or three to catch the bunnies for the pot....

‘Aurélien Arkadiusz’

8ThePam
Sep 16, 2010, 8:41pm Top

Does anyone know if Dilke would be of any use here?

9LolaWalser
Sep 18, 2010, 11:50am Top

You know that some student somewhere must be chasing this particular flamingo, or rabbit...

Well, if anyone comes across something, in any European language... please report.

#4

Matt, that looks inspired less by fact than by the GI tract. :)

10LolaWalser
Sep 18, 2010, 11:52am Top

P.S. And thanks all for the ideas so far.

11BarkingMatt
Sep 18, 2010, 12:00pm Top

:-)

Yeah, like I said : it's pretty hard to interpret. For the little part that I did study once (what's now the Netherlands) it's fairly accurate in distances (within the limes at least), but apparently they didn't care too much about north-south direction...

12anthonywillard
Sep 18, 2010, 6:47pm Top

#11: After all, all roads led to Rome . . .

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