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New LE Gustave Dore illustrated The Divine Comedy

Easton Press Collectors

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1spacmann
Oct 1, 2010, 1:40pm Top

Received flyer today for a new limited edition - Dante's Divine Comedy - 2 volumes, Limited to 800. Didn't see a price and couldn't find it listed on Easton's website.

2astropi
Oct 1, 2010, 2:11pm Top

I just placed my order :)
Yup! Being the Dore afficianado, ain't no way I'm going to let this baby pass me by! As for price, 4 payments of of only $99. Very reasonably priced. I imagine they can get away with such a price because the Dore illustrations are B&W, and obviously much cheaper to produce than color illustrations. That being said, I don't think the B&W illustrations are any less magnificent than color illustrations. In fact, I prefer the Dore Divine Comedy over Dali.

3mj54
Oct 1, 2010, 2:36pm Top

Just ordered my copy.
Thanks for the info.

4MashedPotatoes
Oct 1, 2010, 2:59pm Top

Could you scan the flyer? I'd really like to see what it looks like...

5Goran
Oct 1, 2010, 3:11pm Top

Scan Scan Scan!!!!!!! Its not even in the catalogue yet, let alone their website.

6ironjaw
Oct 1, 2010, 6:06pm Top

Living abroad I never receive any fliers from EP

7wailofatail
Oct 1, 2010, 8:00pm Top

Living State-side, I never do either.

8SilentInAWay
Oct 1, 2010, 9:24pm Top

Does the flyer indicate which translation is used? Does it also include the original Italian?

9EastonQuality
Edited: Oct 1, 2010, 10:15pm Top

I was tired of receiving a flyer every other day at random with not one helping and most publishing's that came out months/years earlier. May I see a scan of the flyer?

& to mention, what is the color, size?

10indigosky
Edited: Oct 1, 2010, 10:57pm Top

These are scans of the order form, not the actual flyer. The flyer itself is too large for me to scan (someone else is probably better at scanning large things & stitching them together than me). These are beautiful volumes. The color of the scans are pretty much true to the original flyer (the brown is a little deeper).

11Django6924
Oct 1, 2010, 10:58pm Top

Hmmm, I bet it's Longfellow's translation.

12indigosky
Oct 1, 2010, 11:03pm Top

Here is the info sheet:

Front
Back

13indigosky
Oct 1, 2010, 11:09pm Top

The translator is Henry Francis Cary.

Project Gutenberg

14freakazoid
Oct 2, 2010, 9:15am Top

Shoot, it's the weekend. Will have to wait till Monday to order, :( Curse you for making me spend more money! My bank account hates me.

15LucasTrask
Oct 3, 2010, 1:41am Top

I have added the flyer to my Verse post (#42) on the Post your posters thread.

16freakazoid
Oct 3, 2010, 9:11am Top

Does anybody know the item#?

17AgaEP
Edited: Oct 3, 2010, 9:10pm Top

Item number can be found on the flyer on the back page. Looks like #2630, but it is not on the web site yet.

18hamletscamaro
Oct 4, 2010, 9:20am Top

Yes, I ordered mine this morning via #2630. Thanks spacmann and astropi for the heads up on these two volumes. These look really good and were very timely since I have been running some searches to find a copy of the Divine Comedy #1816 (http://www.eastonpressbooks.com/leather/product.asp?code=1816) to match my Paradise Lost with Dore illustrations, #2040 (http://www.eastonpressbooks.com/leather/product.asp?code=2040), but this will be even better!

19Tom41
Oct 4, 2010, 10:02am Top

I also ordered a copy this morning and asked for an estimated delivery date. She said it was still "to be determined".

20Goran
Oct 5, 2010, 9:41pm Top

My copy has been reserved. Didn't know when it'd be shipped.

21Goran
Oct 15, 2010, 3:11pm Top

Anyone get an update on when this set will ship?

22SilentInAWay
Oct 15, 2010, 9:04pm Top

If it follows the normal pattern, I would guess no earlier than December, but not later than February.

The Da Vinci and Marcus Aurelius books are slated to ship in November.

Cassell's Illustrated Family Bible is scheduled to ship in January.

We'll see if the Dante ships earlier or later than the Cassell's (they were announced around the same time, I believe).

Of course, we could always be pleasantly surprised -- Dante for Christmas?? Thanksgiving?? No, Halloween!!

23menteith
Oct 20, 2010, 9:31am Top

Am I the only one vexed by the fact that it's two volumes, not either one or three?

24astropi
Oct 20, 2010, 9:57am Top

23: why is that vexing? and which LE are you referring to?

25wailofatail
Edited: Oct 20, 2010, 11:38am Top

>23 menteith:: I hadn't thought of it until you mentioned it, but now that you've mentioned it ...
yeah ... I am vexed.

>24 astropi:: I believe menteith is referring to Dante's Divine Comedie, which you probably know consists of three parts, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. With a two volume edition either two parts are in one book and the other in the second or Purgatorio gets cut in half, (unlikely).

I am particularly fond of the three volume edition E/P published with illustrations by Brian Moser. The illustrations are more contemporary than Dore's and capture well the phantasmagoric imagery that prevails throughout the Divine Comedie.

26hamletscamaro
Edited: Oct 20, 2010, 11:06am Top

Now you guys have me wondering as well how this is divided in two (Dante would not have approved).

I ordered this, but I also asked that they send me the flyer, since I never received it. (Why, I don't know. I still can't figure out why they send flyers they do.) The funny thing is, I didn't get the standard mailer with the letter, brochure, and order form, I just received the brochure thrown into a hand addressed manilla envelope. This has never been done before. I wonder if the mailing was very limited and they didn't have any others on hand. Hmmm...

27astropi
Oct 20, 2010, 11:41am Top

Yeah, three volumes would have been a little easier for us maybe, but I don't know why Dante would have issues with two volumes? For one thing, the Divine Comedy was intended to be read as a whole. Splitting a large work into multiple volumes was done when the work is so large that one volume was simply too large to handle (although sometimes it was done for aesthetic reasons as well). There was (or is, arguably) no need to split it up into a third volume. In fact, if you do split it up into 3 volumes (which I admit, would have been preferable) then it would simply add to the cost. Some might argue that a third volume is worth another $200 or so to the price, but anyway I'm just happy we're getting Dante and Dore together :)

28Tom41
Oct 20, 2010, 12:02pm Top

Dore had difficulty finding a publisher for his illustrated Divine Comedy, so he himself financed publication of Inferno in 1861. Upon its success, Hachette published Purgatorio and Paradiso in 1868 in a single volume. Apparently EP is following the original Dore Divine Comedy format.

29Goran
Oct 20, 2010, 2:16pm Top

>28 Tom41:

Beat me to it. EP is following that specific edition. It's still kinda weird though, Dore likely wasn't too pleased with accepting a single volume purgatory and paradise.

30hamletscamaro
Oct 20, 2010, 5:13pm Top

>27 astropi:,28, I notice that on the flyer the widths of the books appears to be about the same, but the literary content in the Purgatorio and Paradiso should be twice that as what is in Inferno. Are there many more pictures in Inferno than the other volume?

31indigosky
Oct 20, 2010, 5:36pm Top

26: Hmmmmm... if the flyer is a limited edition, maybe I can sell it on ebay for $500. You've just given me a great idea. ;)

32SilentInAWay
Oct 20, 2010, 5:45pm Top

At home I've got the single-volume Divine Comedy (with Dore's illustration) that was published by EP up until a year or two ago. There's a list of illustrations in the front -- I'll check it out and let you know how they're distributed between the three parts.

Incidentally, this is (to my knowledge) the fourth Divine Comedy published by Easton Press: the single-volume edition in the 100 Greatest series, the single-volume Dore-illustrated volume (the Longfellow translation), and the Mandelbaum translation (with illustrations by Barry Moser) published in 3 volumes by EP in 2001.

Does anyone know of any other editions that have been published by Easton Press over the years?

33Tom41
Oct 20, 2010, 6:34pm Top

>30 hamletscamaro:: There are 136 total plates. I found a breakdown that has 126 of them as follows:
Inferno - 63
Purgatorio - 43
Paradiso - 20

34Goran
Oct 20, 2010, 10:03pm Top

>33 Tom41:

Well, there we go. In any case, everybody knows Inferno is the cooler part of the three. There was a video game made about it!

35hamletscamaro
Edited: Oct 29, 2010, 5:28pm Top

>33 Tom41:, Yup, that makes total sense now.

>34 Goran: I do not know what these "video game" things are of which you speak. I'm too busy reading (mostly because the kids have taken over the TV with their Wii.)

My quest to purchase a Dore Divine Comedy was recently brought on by two events. The great resurgence of EP Dore books that they have been producing, as well as a book that my wife recently showed me from her high school years called Dante's Infernal Guide to Your School. The author, Frank Behren's, uses Dore's illustrations along with some brief comedic prose to liken school to Dante's inferno. Hilarious book, but I realized I didn't have a Divine Comedy with Dore's illustrations. So, "Thank you, EP". I will enjoy this new LE.

36tames
Edited: Oct 21, 2010, 6:56am Top

>31 indigosky:
And, perhaps you could get extra if you also offered the plastic wrap the books came in! How about the original shipping box! Oh think of the possibilities!

37menteith
Oct 21, 2010, 9:46am Top

Thanks for the information. I have to admit though, I would much prefer either one large volume, or 1 each for Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. For some reason the two volume thing bothers me...perhaps it shouldn't?

38indigosky
Oct 21, 2010, 11:29am Top

36: I like your way of thinking, tames!

Wouldn't it be hilarious if someone actually did (for a joke) list EP plastic wrap in an ebay auction?

39SilentInAWay
Oct 21, 2010, 12:40pm Top

>33 Tom41:

Curious. My Dore Dante has a completely different breakdown:

Frontispiece Portrait of Dante 1
Inferno 75
Purgatorio 42
Paradiso 18

This is based on the list of plates at the front of the book. I can scan a copy, if people would like to see it.

To those who might be considering seeking out the single-volume Dore-illustrated Easton Press edition of the Comedia:

The Dore engravings are quite nice (I'm looking forward to comparing them with those in the deluxe edition), but the book is not really an Easton Press edition. It is an edition by someone else that has been bound by Easton Press. On the title and copyright pages, it lists the book as being published by Chartwell Books, Inc. (it even has--gasp--an ISBN). Nowhere inside the book is Easton Press ever mentioned. The paper, binding, ribbon marker, fabric endpapers, and cover are all EP quality, however. And it has the E/P logo on the spine.

I bought my copy directly from EP -- it was advertised in their catalog, as well as on their web site (the link is above) -- yet was extremely disappointed that it wasn't an Easton Press edition. It still feels to me like a coffee table knock-off.

40astropi
Oct 21, 2010, 1:42pm Top

39: I understand how you feel. I wish EP would mention if the book is only bound by them as opposed to actually fully published. The same thing happens with the Folio Society, and at least one member is up in arms over the matter!

41RalphDeMorgan
Feb 24, 2011, 1:20pm Top

The Easton Press Dore Divine Comedy set is in two volumes because it's a faithful facsimile of the Victorian edition that was also in two volumes. The Easton Press edition reproduces the original cover art on the two covers and on the front and back of the superb slipcase. The Easton is however, far more luxurious than the original, which was bound in cloth and printed on average paper. By the way, I own a copy of that original edition from the late 1800s and it's still in pretty good shape. Sometimes you still see it on Ebay, but trust me, the Easton is the one.

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