HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist

Longfellow Books

1 Federal Street / 1 Monument Way
Portland, ME 04101

United States

207-772-4045; infolongfellowbooks.com

Type: Bookstore — new books, used books

Web site: http://www.longfellowbooks.com/

Events: http://longfellow.indiebound.com/event

Twitter account: @longfellowbooks

Description: Longfellow's true address is 1 Monument Way, but Google won't map it to that location correctly, so I have chosen very near it instead.

Added by: timspalding.  Contacted: Not contacted.  Venue ID: 1

Members

Cataloged

emily.youngster (22), JBD1 (21), lorannen (11), lottpoet (5), matthewmason (2), timspalding (2), norabelle414 (1), Enchntdrose (1), waitingtoderail (1), private (7)

Comment wall

Well, there aren't sellers anymore—just one, unfortunately.
January 2010 by timspalding
I didn't realize when I moved out of Maine that one of the things I would miss most were the independent book sellers. These are gems in a beautiful city.
July 2009 by ehough75
Longfellow is my favorite bookstore in Portland! I like the people, the atmosphere, and of course the selection of books.
February 2009 by jayde1599
The nice people who work for Longfellow were one of the reasons my wife and I moved to Portland, ME. Three cheers for Longfellow!
March 2008 by timspalding

Upcoming events

Mar
27
Bill Roorbach: Temple Stream *at Longfellow Books* (Friday, March 27 at 7pm)
Temple Stream by Bill Roorbach Friday, March 27th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books (come early to avoid the book buying lines and get a good seat - reading will kick off at 7:30) Great blue herons, yellow birches, damselflies, and beavers are among the talismans by which Bill Roorbach uncovers a natural universe along the stream that runs by his house in Farmington, Maine. Populated by an oddball cast of characters to whom Roorbach and his family might always be considered outsiders, this book chronicles one man's determined effort—occasionally with hilarious results—to follow his stream to its elusive source. Acclaimed essayist and award-winning fiction writer Bill Roorbach uses his singular literary gifts to inspire us to laugh, love, and experience the wonder of living side by side with the natural world. "Roorbach takes readers on a journey in and around Temple Stream, which flows by his 1874 home near Farmington, Maine, about 40 miles northwest of Augusta. He records a series of forays along his stream, observing subtle environmental clues: the mix of trees, the types of garbage, the attitudes of local beavers, the varieties of birds and wildflowers ... Some themes thread through these essays: the progress of home improvements, his wife's pregnancy, his messages-in-a-bottle miraculously returned, his charting of Temple Stream back to its mysterious source. Roorbach's obvious delight in obscure phrasing -"streamside omphaloskepsis," "callipygian cowgirl"-should please literate stream walkers who enjoy a good browse in their dictionaries after a day's wander in the woods." -Publishers Weekly "Here is a narrator who makes you glad to be alive, giddy to be in his presence, grateful to love friends and family and dogs with generosity and abandon, to show tenderness and thus be saved by strangers." -Melanie Rae Thon "There is poetry in Bill Roorbach's prose...his lyricism touched lightly with irony" -The Boston Globe Bill Roorbach's newest novels are The Remedy for Love and the bestselling Life Among Giants, both from Algonquin Books. His other books include the Flannery O'Connor Prize and O. Henry Prize winner Big Bend. Other nonfiction books include Into Woods: Essays, and the romantic memoir Summers With Juliet. His famous craft book, Writing Life Stories: Making Memories into Memoir, Ideas into Essays, and Life into Literature, is used in writing programs around the world. His short work, both fiction and nonfiction, has been published in Harper's, Orion, The Atlantic Monthly, Playboy, The New York Times Magazine, Granta, New York, and dozens of other great places. Join us for an evening with the ridiculously talented, and always entertaining, Bill Roorbach to celebrate the reissue of Temple Stream. Hear Bill read, ask the master about his craft and be prepared to laugh while waiting in line to get your books signed! "Here is a narrator who makes you glad to be alive, giddy to be in his presence, grateful to love friends and family and dogs with generosity and abandon, to show tenderness and thus be saved by strangers." -Melanie Rae Thon "There is poetry in Bill Roorbach's prose...his lyricism touched lightly with irony" -The Boston Globe Bill Roorbach's newest novels are The Remedy for Love and the bestselling Life Among Giants, both from Algonquin Books. His other books include the Flannery O'Connor Prize and O. Henry Prize winner Big Bend. Other nonfiction books include Into Woods: Essays, and the romantic memoir Summers With Juliet. His famous craft book, Writing Life Stories: Making Memories into Memoir, Ideas into Essays, and Life into Literature, is used in writing programs around the world. His short work, both fiction and nonfiction, has been published in Harper's, Orion, The Atlantic Monthly, Playboy, The New York Times Magazine, Granta, New York, and dozens of other great places. Join us for an evening with the ridiculously talented, and always entertaining, Bill Roorbach to celebrate the reissue of Temple Stream. Hear Bill read, ask the master about his craft and be prepared to laugh while waiting in line to get your books signed! "Here is a narrator who makes you glad to be alive, giddy to be in his presence, grateful to love friends and family and dogs with generosity and abandon, to show tenderness and thus be saved by strangers." -Melanie Rae Thon "There is poetry in Bill Roorbach's prose...his lyricism touched lightly with irony" -The Boston Globe Bill Roorbach's newest novels are The Remedy for Love and the bestselling Life Among Giants, both from Algonquin Books. His other books include the Flannery O'Connor Prize and O. Henry Prize winner Big Bend. Other nonfiction books include Into Woods: Essays, and the romantic memoir Summers With Juliet. His famous craft book, Writing Life Stories: Making Memories into Memoir, Ideas into Essays, and Life into Literature, is used in writing programs around the world. His short work, both fiction and nonfiction, has been published in Harper's, Orion, The Atlantic Monthly, Playboy, The New York Times Magazine, Granta, New York, and dozens of other great places. Join us for an evening with the ridiculously talented, and always entertaining, Bill Roorbach to celebrate the reissue of Temple Stream. Hear Bill read, ask the master about his craft and be prepared to laugh while waiting in line to get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Apr
2
Jim Nichols: Closer All the Time *at Longfellow Books* (Thursday, April 2 at 7pm)
Closer All the Time by Jim Nichols Thursday, April 2nd, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books

The inhabitants of Baxter, Maine, are going nowhere fast—but not for lack of trying. In this deftly written jewel of a novel, veteran author Jim Nichols strings together the bittersweet stories of several different characters bound together by shared geography and the insular nature of small-town life. There’s Johnny Lunden, a well-meaning war veteran with a penchant for the local bar and a deep but doomed love for his family. There’s eight-year-old Ted Soule, who shares a first kiss with the Ophelia-like Nadia, the daughter of his Russian neighbors, and Tomi Lambert who observes the confusion of the adults around her as they struggle with accepting their fates.

With the coastal waters of Maine as a backdrop, Nichols artfully explores the nature of connection—hoped for, missed, lost, and found—in Closer All the Time, that very special novel that delivers quick-moving, compelling storytelling with a lasting emotional wallop. You’ll devour it in one sitting, but its characters will linger at the edges of your day like memories of old friends and lovers.

“His men and boys become so real, I feel as if I know what it might have been like to grow up surrounded by brothers. Nichols is one of my favorite writers.” -bestselling author Monica Wood, When We Were the Kennedys Jim Nichols became interested in writing fiction while working as a ticket agent for a commuter airline in Rockland. Born in Brunswick and raised in Freeport, Maine, Nichols has worked variously as bartender, pilot, skycap, taxi driver, fence builder, orange picker, ramp and ticket agent for a commuter airline, travel agent and dispatcher for an air taxi service. His work has appeared in Esquire, Narrative, Zoetrope ASE, december, paris transcontinental (FR), From The Ashes (BR), elimae, Germ, The Clackamas Review, American Fiction, Downeast, River City, Conversely, and Night Train. He has been nominated several times for Pushcart prizes, and his novel, Hull Creek, was the runner-up for the 2012 Maine Book Award for Fiction. In addition to his prolific short story work, he is the author of two previously published works of fiction: Slow Monkeys and Hull Creek. His novel, Closer All the Time, will be released in March, 2015, from Islandport Press. Join us to hear the latest Maine story from Jim , ask your questions and get your books signed!

The inhabitants of Baxter, Maine, are going nowhere fast—but not for lack of trying. In this deftly written jewel of a novel, veteran author Jim Nichols strings together the bittersweet stories of several different characters bound together by shared geography and the insular nature of small-town life. There’s Johnny Lunden, a well-meaning war veteran with a penchant for the local bar and a deep but doomed love for his family. There’s eight-year-old Ted Soule, who shares a first kiss with the Ophelia-like Nadia, the daughter of his Russian neighbors, and Tomi Lambert who observes the confusion of the adults around her as they struggle with accepting their fates.

With the coastal waters of Maine as a backdrop, Nichols artfully explores the nature of connection—hoped for, missed, lost, and found—in Closer All the Time, that very special novel that delivers quick-moving, compelling storytelling with a lasting emotional wallop. You’ll devour it in one sitting, but its characters will linger at the edges of your day like memories of old friends and lovers.

“His men and boys become so real, I feel as if I know what it might have been like to grow up surrounded by brothers. Nichols is one of my favorite writers.” -bestselling author Monica Wood, When We Were the Kennedys Jim Nichols became interested in writing fiction while working as a ticket agent for a commuter airline in Rockland. Born in Brunswick and raised in Freeport, Maine, Nichols has worked variously as bartender, pilot, skycap, taxi driver, fence builder, orange picker, ramp and ticket agent for a commuter airline, travel agent and dispatcher for an air taxi service. His work has appeared in Esquire, Narrative, Zoetrope ASE, december, paris transcontinental (FR), From The Ashes (BR), elimae, Germ, The Clackamas Review, American Fiction, Downeast, River City, Conversely, and Night Train. He has been nominated several times for Pushcart prizes, and his novel, Hull Creek, was the runner-up for the 2012 Maine Book Award for Fiction. In addition to his prolific short story work, he is the author of two previously published works of fiction: Slow Monkeys and Hull Creek. His novel, Closer All the Time, will be released in March, 2015, from Islandport Press. Join us to hear the latest Maine story from Jim , ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Apr
30
Nina MacLaughlin: Hammer Head *at Longfellow Books* (Thursday, April 30 at 7pm)
Hammer head by Nina MacLaughlin Thursday, April 30th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books A warm and inspiring book for anyone who has ever dreamed of changing tracks: the story of a young woman who quit her desk job to become a carpenter. Nina MacLaughlin spent her twenties working at a Boston newspaper, sitting behind a desk and staring at a screen. Yearning for more tangible work, she applied for a job she saw on Craigslist—Carpenter’s Assistant: Women strongly encouraged to apply—despite being a Classics major who couldn't tell a Phillips from a flathead screwdriver. She got the job, and in Hammer head she tells the rich and entertaining story of becoming a carpenter.Writing with infectious curiosity, MacLaughlin describes the joys and frustrations of making things by hand, reveals the challenges of working as a woman in an occupation that is 99 percent male, and explains how manual labor changed the way she sees the world. We meet her unflappable mentor, Mary, a petite but tough carpenter-sage (“Be smarter than the tools!”), as well as wild demo dudes, foul-mouthed plumbers, grizzled hardware store clerks, and the colorful clients whose homes she and Mary work in. Whisking her readers from job to job—building a wall, remodeling a kitchen, gut-renovating a house—MacLaughlin examines the history of the tools she uses and the virtues and varieties of wood. Throughout, she draws on the wisdom of Ovid, Annie Dillard, Studs Terkel, and Mary Oliver to illuminate her experience of work. And, in a deeply moving climax, MacLaughlin strikes out on her own for the first time to build bookshelves for her own father. Hammer head is a passionate book full of sweat, swearing, bashed thumbs, and a deep sense of finding real meaning in work and life. “Not many of us find the courage to follow that small voice inside us to our true work, especially when that work lacks social status and health benefits and financial stability. But here, in this wonderfully assured debut, Nina MacLaughlin compellingly chronicles having done just that, a leap of faith that brings her more deeply into her very core where the stakes are high but the potential for lasting joy is even higher. Lucky for us, MacLaughlin's evocative prose is just as plumb, level, and true as all the wood structures she ultimately learns to build. This is a lovely and important book!” -Andre Dubus III “Hammer head is warm, wise, and authentically inspiring. No other book has made me want to re-read Ovid and retile my bathroom floor, nor given me the conviction that I can do both. I loved it.” -Rosie Schaap Nina MacLaughlin grew up in Massachusetts and lives in Cambridge, where she works as a carpenter. Formerly an editor at the Boston Phoenix, she has written for the Believer, Bookslut, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. Join us to learn more about Nina's transformation from journalist to carpenter , ask your questions and get your books signed! A warm and inspiring book for anyone who has ever dreamed of changing tracks: the story of a young woman who quit her desk job to become a carpenter. Nina MacLaughlin spent her twenties working at a Boston newspaper, sitting behind a desk and staring at a screen. Yearning for more tangible work, she applied for a job she saw on Craigslist—Carpenter’s Assistant: Women strongly encouraged to apply—despite being a Classics major who couldn't tell a Phillips from a flathead screwdriver. She got the job, and in Hammer head she tells the rich and entertaining story of becoming a carpenter.Writing with infectious curiosity, MacLaughlin describes the joys and frustrations of making things by hand, reveals the challenges of working as a woman in an occupation that is 99 percent male, and explains how manual labor changed the way she sees the world. We meet her unflappable mentor, Mary, a petite but tough carpenter-sage (“Be smarter than the tools!”), as well as wild demo dudes, foul-mouthed plumbers, grizzled hardware store clerks, and the colorful clients whose homes she and Mary work in. Whisking her readers from job to job—building a wall, remodeling a kitchen, gut-renovating a house—MacLaughlin examines the history of the tools she uses and the virtues and varieties of wood. Throughout, she draws on the wisdom of Ovid, Annie Dillard, Studs Terkel, and Mary Oliver to illuminate her experience of work. And, in a deeply moving climax, MacLaughlin strikes out on her own for the first time to build bookshelves for her own father. Hammer head is a passionate book full of sweat, swearing, bashed thumbs, and a deep sense of finding real meaning in work and life. “Not many of us find the courage to follow that small voice inside us to our true work, especially when that work lacks social status and health benefits and financial stability. But here, in this wonderfully assured debut, Nina MacLaughlin compellingly chronicles having done just that, a leap of faith that brings her more deeply into her very core where the stakes are high but the potential for lasting joy is even higher. Lucky for us, MacLaughlin's evocative prose is just as plumb, level, and true as all the wood structures she ultimately learns to build. This is a lovely and important book!” -Andre Dubus III “Hammer head is warm, wise, and authentically inspiring. No other book has made me want to re-read Ovid and retile my bathroom floor, nor given me the conviction that I can do both. I loved it.” -Rosie Schaap Nina MacLaughlin grew up in Massachusetts and lives in Cambridge, where she works as a carpenter. Formerly an editor at the Boston Phoenix, she has written for the Believer, Bookslut, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. Join us to learn more about Nina's transformation from journalist to carpenter , ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
May
28
Gerry Boyle: Once Burned *at Longfellow Books* (Thursday, May 28 at 7pm)
Once Burned by Gerry Boyle Thursday, May 28th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books Life is briefly as it should be for Jack McMorrow: He and his wife Roxanne have retreated from the stress and danger of their day jobs to raise their daughter Sophie. But when development and arson threaten the nearby town of Sanctuary, and a crazy accident brings back mistakes from Roxanne’s past, Jack’s nose for crime leads him into a darker and deeply twisted tale. Something explosive is smoldering beneath the glossy facades and picturesque town square in Sanctuary, and the enemy is closer than he thinks. In Once Burned, the tenth installment of the internationally popular McMorrow series, Jack will take you along as he hunts a killer with a long memory and a very short fuse. Like many crime novelists, Gerry Boyle began his writing career in newspapers—the best training ground ever. After Colby College, he knocked around, including stints as a roofer, a postman, and a manuscript reader at a big New York publisher. His first reporting job was with a weekly in the paper mill town of Rumford, Maine. After a few months it was on to the (Waterville, Maine) Morning Sentinel, where editors learned early on that he worked best when left to his own devices. He wrote about stuff he saw in police stations, courtrooms, in the towns and cities of Maine. Deadline came out in 1993. With an assist from Robert B. Parker, he landed a top-flight literary agent and the books came steadily after that. McMorrow and Boyle grew up together, though at different rates. Join us to hear Gerry's latest, ask your questions and get your books signed! Life is briefly as it should be for Jack McMorrow: He and his wife Roxanne have retreated from the stress and danger of their day jobs to raise their daughter Sophie. But when development and arson threaten the nearby town of Sanctuary, and a crazy accident brings back mistakes from Roxanne’s past, Jack’s nose for crime leads him into a darker and deeply twisted tale. Something explosive is smoldering beneath the glossy facades and picturesque town square in Sanctuary, and the enemy is closer than he thinks. In Once Burned, the tenth installment of the internationally popular McMorrow series, Jack will take you along as he hunts a killer with a long memory and a very short fuse. Like many crime novelists, Gerry Boyle began his writing career in newspapers—the best training ground ever. After Colby College, he knocked around, including stints as a roofer, a postman, and a manuscript reader at a big New York publisher. His first reporting job was with a weekly in the paper mill town of Rumford, Maine. After a few months it was on to the (Waterville, Maine) Morning Sentinel, where editors learned early on that he worked best when left to his own devices. He wrote about stuff he saw in police stations, courtrooms, in the towns and cities of Maine. Deadline came out in 1993. With an assist from Robert B. Parker, he landed a top-flight literary agent and the books came steadily after that. McMorrow and Boyle grew up together, though at different rates. Join us to hear Gerry's latest, ask your questions and get your books signed! Like many crime novelists, Gerry Boyle began his writing career in newspapers—the best training ground ever. After Colby College, he knocked around, including stints as a roofer, a postman, and a manuscript reader at a big New York publisher. His first reporting job was with a weekly in the paper mill town of Rumford, Maine. After a few months it was on to the (Waterville, Maine) Morning Sentinel, where editors learned early on that he worked best when left to his own devices. He wrote about stuff he saw in police stations, courtrooms, in the towns and cities of Maine. Deadline came out in 1993. With an assist from Robert B. Parker, he landed a top-flight literary agent and the books came steadily after that. McMorrow and Boyle grew up together, though at different rates. Join us to hear Gerry's latest, ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)
Jun
25
Lou Ureneck: The Great Fire *at Longfellow Books* (Thursday, June 25 at 7pm)
The Great Fire by Lou Ureneck Thursday, June 25th, 7:00pm at Longfellow Books

The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians—a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide’s centennial. The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay. With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people. By turns harrowing and inspiring, The Great Fire uses eyewitness accounts, documents, and survivor narratives to bring this episode—extraordinary for its brutality as well as its heroism—to life. "Ureneck's account is magisterial in its portrait of the personalities involved, and it charts equally well the densely intertwined currents of history as his narrative gathers speed ... a tragic but very moving story." -Robert Shenk, author of America's Black Sea Fleet Lou Ureneck is a teacher and writer. He lives in Boston. His first book, "Backcast," won the National Outdoor Book Award for literary merit. He has worked as a reporter and editor at the Providence Journal, the Portland (Maine) Press Herald and the Philadelphia Inquirer. He also has been a merchant seaman and carpenter. Ureneck also was a Nieman fellow and editor-in-residence at Harvard University. He built a cabin in Maine with his brother, Paul,and wrote about the experience in his 2011 book Cabin. Join us for a reading with Lou to celebrate his latest book, ask your questions and get your books signed!

The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians—a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide’s centennial. The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay. With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people. By turns harrowing and inspiring, The Great Fire uses eyewitness accounts, documents, and survivor narratives to bring this episode—extraordinary for its brutality as well as its heroism—to life. "Ureneck's account is magisterial in its portrait of the personalities involved, and it charts equally well the densely intertwined currents of history as his narrative gathers speed ... a tragic but very moving story." -Robert Shenk, author of America's Black Sea Fleet Lou Ureneck is a teacher and writer. He lives in Boston. His first book, "Backcast," won the National Outdoor Book Award for literary merit. He has worked as a reporter and editor at the Providence Journal, the Portland (Maine) Press Herald and the Philadelphia Inquirer. He also has been a merchant seaman and carpenter. Ureneck also was a Nieman fellow and editor-in-residence at Harvard University. He built a cabin in Maine with his brother, Paul,and wrote about the experience in his 2011 book Cabin. Join us for a reading with Lou to celebrate his latest book, ask your questions and get your books signed!

Location: Street: One Monument Way City: Portland, Province: Maine Postal Code: 04101-4078 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
… (more)

No Local Book Search

Not integrated with LibraryThing's Local Book Search. (find out more)

Find venues
address or postal code
small | full page
Vicinity of Longfellow Books
BookstoreLibraryFair/FestivalLittle LibrariesMultiple

Member images (1)

Get Readar

The venues and events in LibraryThing can also be found in the handy iPhone Application Readar.

» Get Readar

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 96,141,363 books! | Top bar: Always visible