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Seminary Co-op Bookstore

5751 S. Woodlawn
Chicago, IL 60637

United States

773-752-4381; eventssemcoop.com

Type: Bookstore — new books

Web site: http://www.semcoop.com/

Events: http://www.semcoop.com/event

Added by: lilithcat.  Contacted: Yes.  Venue ID: 20

Members

Cataloged

rywang (33), lilithcat (21), jaime_d (15), JGL (7), todolson (3), drentfro (3), encephalical (2), paradoxosalpha (2), bburtt (1), hikatie (1), private (26)

Comment wall

Sunday, 11 November 2012 was their last day of business at 5757 South University Avenue; they're moving just around the corner, and the new opening date should be 21 November 2012.
November 2012 by theologicalbooks
I told a Seminary Co-op employee about LT local and also about the bookstore integration program. She turned out to be an LT user too & said she'd pass on the info to the relevant people!
March 2008 by markell
Entering this place for the first time, I felt I'd died and gone to heaven. I miss it every time I have to go into a Barnes & Noble.
March 2008 by fannyprice

Upcoming events

Oct
25
David Nirenberg ~ Neighboring Faiths: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism in the Middle Ages and Today ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Saturday, October 25 at 3pm)
Saturday, October 25, 3 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

Christianity, Judaism, and Islam are usually treated as autonomous religions, but in fact across the long course of their histories the three religions have developed in interaction with one another. In Neighboring Faiths, David Nirenberg examines how Muslims, Christians, and Jews lived with and thought about each other during the Middle Ages and what the medieval past can tell us about how they do so today.

There have been countless scripture-based studies of the three “religions of the book,” but Nirenberg goes beyond those to pay close attention to how the three religious neighbors loved, tolerated, massacred, and expelled each other—all in the name of God—in periods and places both long ago and far away. Nirenberg argues that the three religions need to be studied in terms of how each affected the development of the others over time, their proximity of religious and philosophical thought as well as their overlapping geographies, and how the three “neighbors” define—and continue to define—themselves and their place in terms of one another. From dangerous attractions leading to interfaith marriage; to interreligious conflicts leading to segregation, violence, and sometimes extermination; to strategies for bridging the interfaith gap through language, vocabulary, and poetry, Nirenberg aims to understand the intertwined past of the three faiths as a way for their heirs to produce the future—together.

David Nirenberg is the Deborah R. and Edgar D. Jannotta Professor of Medieval History and Social Thought and the Roman Family Director of the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society, both at the University of Chicago. His most recent book is Anti-Judaism: The Western Tradition.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)… (more)
Oct
26
Lucy Pick ~ Pilgrimage ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Sunday, October 26 at 3pm)
Please join us in welcoming Lucy Pick as she reads from and discusses her first novel, Pilgrimage. Pilgrimage is a story about the Middle Ages that explores betrayal, friendship, illness, miracles, healing, and redemption on the road to Compostela. Lucy Pick is a historian of medieval religious thought and practice and teaches at the University of Chicago Divinity School. Her current research and teaching interests include the relationships between gender and religion, connections between historical writing and theology, the development of monastic thought and practice, reading and writing as spiritual exercises, and the ways in which religion shapes lives through ritual. More about Pilgrimage: For the rest of twelfth-century Europe, Spain was a far-off and exotic place, home to the holy site of Compostela, shrine of Saint James. The saint’s tomb drew a perpetual wave of pilgrims, coming for adventure, or seeking a miracle from the saint. Pilgrimage is the story of one of those pilgrims. The last thing Gebirga of Flanders remembers seeing is the argument between her parents that ended in her mother’s death. In the years since, she has learned to negotiate her family’s castle of Gistel as a blind woman but everyone assumes that one day her home will be the convent founded in her mother’s honor. An accidental encounter offers another path, and Gebirga flees her callous family with a pack of pilgrims that includes a count’s daughter bound for marriage, two clerics writing a guidebook, and a mysterious messenger with an unknown agenda, all headed along the pilgrimage road to Compostela. The journey takes Gebirga from her home on the edge of the North Sea across the kingdoms of France and into the Iberian Peninsula, where her mission to escort a young noblewoman becomes a dangerous adventure involving power-hungry kings and queens and even the Roman Pope. But can a blind woman navigate the shoals of international politics? To find a place where she can belong, Gebirga must learn there are other ways of seeing the truth than with her eyes.

Location: Street: The Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-1507 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Oct
27
Andrew Kaufman ~ Give War and Peace a Chance: Tolstoyan Wisdom for Troubled Times ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Monday, October 27 at 5:30pm)
Monday, October 27th, 5:30 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

Co-sponsored with CEERES | The Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

Give War and Peace a chance takes readers on a journey through War and Peace that reframes their very understanding of what it means to live through troubled times and survive them. Touching on a broad range of topics, from courage to romance, parenting to death, Kaufman demonstrates how Tolstoy’s wisdom can help us live fuller, more meaningful lives. The ideal companion to War and Peace, this book will also be enjoyable to those who have never read a word of Tolstoy, making that masterpiece more approachable, relevant, and fun.

Andrew D. Kaufman, internationally recognized Russian literature scholar at the University of Virginia, is the author of Understanding Tolstoy and coauthor of Russian for Dummies. An award-winning teacher of Russian language, literature, and culture, he is a featured Tolstoy expert on Oprah.com and is frequently invited to discuss Russian literature and culture on national and international television and radio programs.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Oct
28
Reggie L. Williams ~ Bonhoeffer's Black Jesus: Harlem Renaissance Theology and an Ethic of Resistance ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Tuesday, October 28 at 6pm)
Tuesday, October 28th, 6 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

In Bonhoeffer’s Black Jesus author Reggie L. Williams follows Dietrich Bonhoeffer as he defies Hitler's Germany with Harlem’s black Jesus. The Christology Bonhoeffer learned in Harlem’s churches featured a black Christ who suffered with African Americans in their struggle against systemic injustice and racial violence—and then resisted. In the pews of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, under the leadership of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr., Bonhoeffer absorbed the Christianity of the Harlem Renaissance. This Christianity included a Jesus who stands with the oppressed rather than joins the oppressors and a theology that challenges the way God can be used to underwrite a union of race and religion.

Reggie L. Williams is Assistant Professor of Christian Ethics at McCormick Theological Seminary. He is a member of the International Dietrich Bonhoeffer Society, as well as the Society for the Study of Black Religion, and a founding member of the Society for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Religion.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-1600 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Oct
29
Terrence J. Rynne ~ Jesus Christ, Peacemaker: A New Theology of Peace ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Wednesday, October 29 at 6pm)
On Wednesday, October 29th at 6pm, the Seminary Cooperative Bookstore in Hyde Park, in conjunction with the Catholic Theological Union and the other seminaries on the University of Chicago campus, will sponsor "Peacemaking Not Pacifism: A New Paradigm." This public conversation will feature Terrence J. Rynne, author of the recently published book, Jesus Christ, Peacemaker: A New Theology of Peace, and Father Bill Kenneally, a well-known priest in the Archdiocese of Chicago—the former beloved pastor of St. Gertude's parish on Chicago’s North Side who is currently serving as a chaplain to the Sisters of Mercy.

Terrence Rynne’s earlier book Gandhi and Jesus: The Saving Power of Nonviolence was well received in 2008. In Jesus Christ, Peacemaker, Terry Rynne argues that because of the theory of justifiable war, which became the one and only stance of the Church on war and violence, we lost the amazing, soul-sized teaching of Jesus. We lost the dynamic ethic that changed the world--that stood against war and violence but more importantly, attacked the underlying causes of war and violence and fashioned full-blown peace.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-1600 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Oct
30
Anne Benvenuti ~ Spirit Unleashed: Reimagining Human-Animal Relations ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Thursday, October 30 at 6pm)
Thursday, October 30, 6 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

In Spirit Unleashed, Anne Benvenuti uses analysis of real encounters with wild animals to take us on an intellectual tour of our thinking about animals by way of biological sciences, scientific psychology, philosophy, and theology to show that we have been wrong in our understanding of ourselves amongst other animals. The good news is that we can correct our course and make ourselves happier in the process. Drawing us into encounters with a desert rattlesnake, an offended bonobo, an injured fawn, a curious whale, a determined woodpecker, and others, she gives us a glimpse of their souls. Benvenuti strongly makes the case that to change the way we think about animals—and our way of relating to them—holds the possibility of changing all life on Earth for the better.

Anne Benvenuti is a professor of psychology and philosophy, a licensed psychologist, an interdisciplinary scholar, and a priest of the Episcopal Church. Her scholarly work focuses on models of natural spirituality that are both scientifically grounded and accessible from religious perspectives. She is engaged in social policy work as a member of the UN NGO Committee for Mental Health and is a Trustee and UN Representative for the Parliament of the Worlds' Religions. She is also a published poet and naturalist.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
1
Richard Fizdale ~ 999: A History of Chicago in Ten Stories ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Saturday, November 1 at 3pm)
Saturday, November 1st, 3 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

The story of 999 is the story of Chicago at one of the most pivotal and explosive moments in its history. Set along the city's storied lakefront, 999 details the wealth, greed, power, corruption and even murder that accompanied the rise of arguably the most beautiful and historical residential building in Chicago. Lavishly illustrated and well researched, Fizdale's vivid account of a land grab so extensive that it was contested for more than five decades, sets the stage for the war for what would become Streeterville. He includes fascinating and largely unknown details of the lives of the boldfaced names of Chicago's past -- from the period just after the Chicago fire to the present.

Richard “Rick” Fizdale is a former Chairman of the Board, CEO and Chief Creative Officer of Leo Burnett, one of the most successful ad agencies in the world. He currently lives at 999 with his wife and two daughters.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-1600 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
5
Jesse Ball ~ Silence Once Begun ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Wednesday, November 5 at 6pm)
Wednesday, November 5th, 6 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

Over the course of several months, eight people vanish from their homes in the same Japanese town, a single playing card found on each door. Known as “the Narito Disappearances,” the crime has authorities baffled—until a confession appears on the police’s doorstep, signed by one Oda Sotatsu, a thread salesman.

Sotatsu is arrested, jailed, and interrogated, but he refuses to speak. Even as his family comes to visit, even as his execution looms, and even as a young woman named Jito Joo enters his cell, he maintains his vow of silence. And as a journalist’s obsession uncovers more to the story, Jesse Ball spins a wildly inventive and emotionally powerful take of unjust conviction and lost love.

Jesse Ball is the author of three previous novels, including Samedi the deafness, and several books of verse, bestiaries, and sketchbooks. His awards include the 2008 Paris Review Plimpton Prize; his verse has been included in the Best American Poetry series. He gives classes on lucid dreaming and lying at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-1600 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
6
Jess Row ~ Your Face in Mine ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Thursday, November 6 at 6pm)
Thursday, November 6, 6 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

One afternoon, not long after Kelly Thorndike has moved back to his hometown of Baltimore, an African American man he doesn't recognize calls out to him. To Kelly’s shock, the man identifies himself as Martin, who was one of Kelly’s closest friends in high school—and, before his disappearance nearly twenty years before, skinny, white, and Jewish. Martin then tells an astonishing story: After years of immersing himself in black culture, he’s had a plastic surgeon perform “racial reassignment surgery”—altering his hair, skin, and physiognomy to allow him to pass as African American. Unknown to his family or childhood friends, Martin has been living a new life ever since.

Now, however, Martin feels he can no longer keep his new identity a secret; he wants Kelly to help him ignite a controversy that will help sell racial reassignment surgery to the world. Kelly, still recovering from the death of his wife and child and looking for a way to begin anew, agrees, and things quickly begin to spiral out of control.

Inventive and thought-provoking, Your face in mine is a brilliant novel about cultural and racial alienation and the nature of belonging in a world where identity can be a stigma or a lucrative brand.

Jess Row was born in 1974 in Washington, DC. After graduating from Yale in 1997, he taught English for two years as a Yale-China fellow at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He completed an MFA at the University of Michigan in 2001. His first book, The Train to Lo Wu, a collection of short stories set in Hong Kong, was published in 2005; in 2006 it was shortlisted for the PEN/Hemingway Award and was a finalist for the Kiriyama Prize. In 2007 he was named a “Best Young American Novelist” by Granta. His second collection of stories, Nobody Ever Gets Lost, was published by FiveChapters Books in February 2011. His first novel, Your face in mine, will be published by Riverhead Books in August 2014.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
8
Dan Pashman ~ Eat More Better: How to Make Every Bite More Delicious ~ 57th Street Books (Saturday, November 8 at 3pm)
Saturday, November 8, 3 PM 57th Street Books 1301 E. 57th St. Phone: 773.684.1300 fiftysev@semcoop.com

In the bestselling tradition of Alton Brown’s Good Eats and M.F.K. Fisher’s The Art of Eating, Dan Pashman analyzes everyday foods in extraordinary detail to answer some of the most pressing questions of our time, including: Is a cheeseburger better when the cheese is on the bottom, closer to your tongue, to accentuate cheesy goodness? What are the ethics of cherry-picking specific ingredients from a snack mix? And what role does surface-area-to-volume ratio play in fried food enjoyment and ice cube selection?

Written with an infectious blend of humor and smarts, Eat More Better is a tongue-in-cheek textbook that teaches readers to eat for maximum pleasure. Chapters are divided into subjects like engineering, philosophy, economics, and physical science, and feature hundreds of drawings, charts, and infographics to illustrate key concepts like The Porklift—a bacon lattice structure placed beneath a pancake stack to elevate it off the plate, thus preventing the bottom pancake from becoming soggy with syrup and imbuing the bacon with maple-based deliciousness.

Dan Pashman is the creator and host of WNYC’s James Beard Award–nominated food podcast The Sporkful. He’s also the host of the Cooking Channel web series Good to Know and You’re Eating It Wrong and a contributor to NPR, Slate, Buzzfeed, and LA’s KCRW. He lives with his wife and two daughters. Find Dan at Sporkful.com.

Location: Street: 57th Street Books Additional: 1301 E. 57th St. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
12
Robert Howse ~ Leo Strauss: Man of Peace ~ International House (Wednesday, November 12 at 6pm)
Wednesday, November 12, 6 PM International House, Home Room 1414 E. 59th Street Phone: 773.753.2270 i-house-programs@uchicago.edu

Leo Strauss is known to many people as a thinker of the right, who inspired hawkish views on national security and perhaps even advocated war without limits. Moving beyond gossip and innuendo about Strauss's followers and the Bush administration, this book provides the first comprehensive analysis of Strauss's writings on political violence, considering also what he taught in the classroom on this subject. In stark contrast to popular perception, Strauss emerges as a man of peace, favorably disposed to international law and skeptical of imperialism – a critic of radical ideologies (right and left) who warns of the dangers to free thought and civil society when philosophers and intellectuals ally themselves with movements that advocate violence. Robert Howse provides new readings of Strauss's confrontation with fascist/Nazi jurist Carl Schmitt, his debate with Alexandre Kojève about philosophy and tyranny, and his works on Machiavelli and Thucydides and examines Strauss's lectures on Kant's Perpetual Peace and Grotius's Rights of War and Peace.

Robert Howse is the Lloyd C. Nelson Professor of International Law at New York University Law School, where he serves on the advisory board of the Center for Law and Philosophy. He has taught as a visiting professor at Harvard University, the University of Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne), and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and has previously held positions at the University of Michigan and the University of Toronto. His publications include, with Bryan-Paul Frost, the translation of the interpretative essay for Alexandre Kojève's Outline of a Phenomenology of Right and The Federal Vision: Legitimacy and Levels of Governance in the US and the EU, co-edited with Kalypso Nicolaidis, as well as several articles on twentieth-century political thinkers, including Strauss, Kojève and Schmitt.

Location: Street: International House Additional: 1414 E. 59th Street City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-2997 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
14
Joanne Diaz ~ My Favorite Tyrants & Angela Sorby ~ The Sleeve Waves (Friday, November 14 at 6pm)
Friday, November 14th, 6 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

Winner of the 2014 Brittingham Prize in Poetry, selected by Naomi Shihab Nye

The word “tyrant” carries negative connotations, but in this new collection, Joanne Diaz tries to understand what makes tyranny so compelling, even seductive. These dynamic, funny, often poignant poems investigate the nature of tyranny in all of its forms—political, cultural, familial, and erotic. Poems about Stalin, Lenin, and Castro appear beside poems about deeply personal histories. The result is a powerful exploration of desire, grief, and loss in a world where private relationships are always illuminated and informed by larger, more despotic forces.

Joanne Diaz is an assistant professor of English at Illinois Wesleyan University. She is the author of an earlier collection of poems, The Lessons, and her poetry has appeared in AGNI, The American Poetry Review, and Prairie Schooner, among other publications. She is also a past recipient of writing fellowships from the Illinois Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Winner of the 2014 Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry, selected by Naomi Shihab Nye

Inspired by thrift store knit sleeves, punk rock record sleeves, and, of course, print book sleeves, Angela Sorby explores how the concrete world hails us in waves of color and sound. She asks implicitly, “What makes the sleeve wave? Is it the body or some force larger than the self?” As Sorby’s tough, ironic, and subtly political voice repeatedly insists, we apprehend, use, and release more energy than we can possibly control. This collection includes two main parts—one visual, one aural—flanking a central pastoral poem sung by Virgilian sheep. Meant to be read both silently and aloud, the poems in The Sleeve Waves meditate on how almost everything—like light and sound—comes to us in waves that break and vanish and yet continue.

Angela Sorby is an associate professor of English at Marquette University. She is the author of three books: Distance Learning: Poems; Schoolroom Poets: Childhood, Performance, and the Place of American Poetry; and Bird skin coat, winner of the 2009 Brittingham Prize in Poetry.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-1600 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
16
Maya Schenwar ~ Locked Down, Locked Out: Why Prison Doesn't Work and How We Can Do Better ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Sunday, November 16 at 3pm)
Sunday, November 16, 3 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

In Locked Down, Locked Out, journalist Maya Schenwar looks at how prison breaks apart families and communities, creating a rippling effect that touches every corner of our society. Through the stories of prisoners and their families, as well as her own family's experience of her sister's incarceration, Schenwar shows how the institution that locks up 2.3 million Americans—and decimates poor communities of color—is shredding the ties that, if nurtured, could foster real collective safety.

The destruction does not end upon exiting the prison walls: The 95 percent of prisoners who are released emerge with even fewer economic opportunities and fewer human connections on the outside. Locked Down, Locked Out shows how incarceration takes away the very things that might enable people to build better lives.

Looking toward a future beyond imprisonment, Schenwar profiles community-based initiatives that foster anti-racist, anti-classist, pro-humanity approaches to justice. These programs successfully deal with problems—both individual harm and larger social wrongs—through connection rather than isolation, moving toward a safer future for all of us.

Maya Schenwar is Truthout’s Editor-in-Chief. Her book, Locked Down, Locked Out: Why Prison Doesn’t Work and How We Can Do Better, will be out from Berrett-Koehler Publishers in October. Follow her on Twitter: @mayaschenwar.

Previously, she was a senior editor and reporter at Truthout, writing on US defense policy, the criminal justice system, campaign politics, and immigration reform. Prior to her work at Truthout, Maya was contributing editor at Punk Planet magazine. She has also written for The New York Times, The Guardian, In These Times, Ms. Magazine, AlterNet, Z Magazine, Bitch Magazine, Common Dreams, the New Jersey Star-Ledger and others. She also served as a publicity coordinator for Voices for Creative Nonviolence. Maya serves as Chair of the Media Consortium, Coordinating Committee, and is on the Board of Advisors at Waging Nonviolence.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
18
Hillary Chute and Patrick Jagoda ~ Comics & Media: A Special Issue of "Critical Inquiry" ~ Seminary Co-op Bookstore (Tuesday, November 18 at 6pm)
Tuesday, November 18, 6 PM Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue Phone: 773.752.4381 events@semcoop.com

The past decade has seen the medium of comics reach unprecedented heights of critical acclaim and commercial success. Comics & Media reflects that, bringing together an amazing array of contributors--creators and critics alike--to discuss the state, future, and potential of the medium.

Loaded with full-color reproductions of work by such legends as R. Crumb, Art Spiegelman, Alison Bechdel, Chris Ware, Daniel Clowes, and Lynda Barry, the book addresses the place of comics in both a contemporary and historical context. Essays by such high-profile figures as Tom Gunning, N. Katherine Hayles, Patrick Jagoda, and W. J. T. Mitchell address a stunning range of topics, including the place of comics in the history of aesthetics, changes to popular art forms, digital humanities, and ongoing tensions between new and old media. The result is a substantial step forward for our understanding of what comics are and can be, and the growing place they hold in our culture.

Hillary L. Chute is the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of English at the University of Chicago and the author of Graphic Women and Outside the Box: Interviews with Contemporary Cartoonists, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

Patrick Jagoda is assistant professor of English and cinema and media studies at the University of Chicago. His forthcoming book is entitled Network Aesthetics. He is coeditor of Critical Inquiry.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Nov
20
Sapna Thottathil ~ India's Organic Farming Revolution (Thursday, November 20 at 6pm)
Thursday, November 20th at 6pm Seminary Co-op Bookstore 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue

Should you buy organic food? Is it just a status symbol, or is it really better for us? Is it really better for the environment? What about organic produce grown thousands of miles from our kitchens, or on massive corporately owned farms? Is “local” or “small-scale” better, even if it’s not organic? A lot of consumers who would like to do the right thing for their health and the environment are asking such questions.

Sapna Thottathil calls on us to rethink the politics of organic food by focusing on what it means for the people who grow and sell it—what it means for their health, the health of their environment, and also their economic and political well-being. Taking readers to the state of Kerala in southern India, she shows us a place where the so-called “Green Revolution” program of hybrid seeds, synthetic fertilizers, and rising pesticide use had failed to reduce hunger while it caused a cascade of economic, medical, and environmental problems. Farmers burdened with huge debts from buying the new seeds and chemicals were committing suicide in troubling numbers. Farm laborers suffered from pesticide poisoning and rising rates of birth defects. A sharp fall in biodiversity worried environmental activists, and everyone was anxious about declining yields of key export crops like black pepper and coffee.

In their debates about how to solve these problems, farmers, environmentalists, and policymakers drew on Kerala’s history of and continuing commitment to grassroots democracy. In 2010, they took the unprecedented step of enacting a policy that requires all Kerala growers to farm organically by 2020. How this policy came to be and its immediate economic, political, and physical effects on the state’s residents offer lessons for everyone interested in agriculture, the environment, and what to eat for dinner. Kerala’s example shows that when done right, this kind of agriculture can be good for everyone in our global food system.

An advocate of sustainable food systems, Sapna E. Thottathil is currently a senior program associate for Health Care Without Harm/Physicians for Social Responsibility, where she promotes sustainable food purchasing by health care institutions and organizes medical professionals around environmental policy. A member of the board of directors for the San Francisco Women’s Environmental Network, she earned her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Presented by the Program on the Global Environment and cosponsored by the Center for International Studies, Southern Asia at Chicago and the Seminary Coop Bookstore.

Location: Street: Seminary Co-op Bookstore Additional: 5751 S. Woodlawn Avenue City: Chicago, Province: Illinois Postal Code: 60637-1507 Country: United States (added from IndieBound)
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Mar
13
D. N. Rodowick, Elegy for Theory (Friday, March 13, 2015 at 6pm)
D. N. Rodowick, Elegy for Theory

Speaking and signing, Seminary Co-op (added from Harvard University Press)
Mar
20
Russell H. Tuttle, Apes and Human Evolution (Friday, March 20, 2015 at 6pm)
Russell H. Tuttle, Apes and Human Evolution

Speaking and signing, Seminary Co-op (added from Harvard University Press)
May
3
Saskia Sassen, Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy (Sunday, May 3, 2015 at 3pm)
Saskia Sassen, Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy

Speaking and signing, Seminary Co-op (added from Harvard University Press)

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