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Holy Ignorance: When Religion and Culture…
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Holy Ignorance: When Religion and Culture Part Ways (edition 2010)

by Olivier Roy, Ros Schwartz (Translator)

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732246,252 (4.5)1
Member:hnn
Title:Holy Ignorance: When Religion and Culture Part Ways
Authors:Olivier Roy
Other authors:Ros Schwartz (Translator)
Info:C Hurst & Co Publishers Ltd (2010), Hardcover, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:religion, politics

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Holy Ignorance: When Religion and Culture Part Ways (Columbia/Hurst) by Olivier Roy

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This is wide-sweeping look at the presence of religion in today's world Roy shows that much religion has become detached from the culture in which it came into being. This has lent a greater fervency to many believers and the cause of greater strife. Roy gives examples of group where the relation between religion, territory, culture, and lnguge are comples; the Plmiris in Central ASis, African-Emriecans, Tatars and Moriscos. He looks at neo-ethic groups based on religious markers, such as how Muslims are regarded in the Indian subcontinent, religious groups in Bosnia, and Judaism in israel. New paradims have arisen involving sexuality, women, homosexuality, paganism, traditionalist severing of ties from the main authority, and religious purity. Roy looks at the export of religions, and in the process how they are "branded" or "formatted". This is an engrossing book and gives one lot to think about ( )
  vpfluke | Jan 19, 2015 |
Olivier Roy, world-renowned authority on Islam and politics, finds in the modern disconnection between faith communities and socio-cultural identities a fertile space for fundamentalism to grow. Instead of freeing the world from religion, secularization has encouraged a kind of holy ignorance to take root, an anti-intellectualism that promises immediate, emotional access to the sacred and positions itself in direct opposition to contemporary pagan culture. The secularization of society was supposed to free people from religion, yet individuals are converting en masse to fundamentalist faiths, such as Protestant evangelicalism, Islamic Salafism, and Haredi Judaism. These religions either reconnect adherents to their culture through casual referents, like halal fast food, or maintain their momentum through purification rituals, such as speaking in tongues, a practice that allows believers to utter a language that is entirely their own. Instead of a return to traditional religious worship, we are now witnessing the individualization of faith and the disassociation of faith communities from ethnic and national identities. Roy explores the options now available to powers that hope to integrate or control these groups; and whether marginalization or homogenization will further divide believers from their culture. ( )
  HurstPub | Nov 4, 2010 |
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Over the past few years, a number of theories have been offered about the rise of fundamentalism. Roy proposes the most original — and the most persuasive. Fundamentalism, in his view, is a symptom of, rather than a reaction against, the increasing secularization of society. Whether it takes the form of the Christian right in the United States or Salafist purity in the Muslim world, fundamentalism is not about restoring a more authentic and deeply spiritual religious experience. It is instead a manifestation of holy ignorance, Roy’s biting term meant to characterize the worldview of those who, having lost both their theology and their roots, subscribe to ideas as incoherent as they are ultimately futile. The most important thing to know about those urging the restoration of a lost religious authenticity is that they are sustained by the very forces they denounce.
added by jimroberts | editNew York Times, Alan Wolfe (Dec 24, 2010)
 
added by HurstPub | editFinancial Times, John Lloyd (Aug 29, 2010)
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0231701268, Hardcover)

Olivier Roy, one of the world's most distinguished analysts of political Islam, finds in the modern disconnection between faith communities and sociocultural identities a fertile space for fundamentalism to grow. Instead of freeing the world from religion, secularization has encouraged a kind of holy ignorance to take root, an anti-intellectualism that promises immediate access to the sacred and positions itself in direct opposition to contemporary pagan culture.

The secularization of society was supposed to free people from religion, yet individuals are converting en masse to such fundamentalist faiths as Protestant evangelicalism, Islamic Salafism, and Haredi Judaism. These religions either reconnect adherents to their culture through casual referents, like halal fast food, or "deculturate" through "purification" rituals, such as speaking in tongues, which allows believers to utter a language entirely their own. Instead of a return to traditional religious worship, Roy argues we are witnessing the individualization of faith and the disassociation of faith communities from ethnic and national identities. This has placed culturally integrated religions, such as Catholicism and eastern orthodox Christianity, on the defensive, and presents new challenges to state and society. Roy explores the options available to powers that hope to integrate or control these groups, and he considers whether marginalization or homogenization will further divide believers from their culture.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:13 -0400)

"Olivier Roy, world renowned authority on Islam and politics, finds in the modern disconnection between faith communities and sociocultural identities a fertile space for fundamentalism to grow. Instead of freeing the world from religion, secularization has encouraged a kind of holy ignorance to take root, an anti-intellectualism that promises immediate, emotional access to the sacred and positions itself in direct opposition to contemporary pagan culture. The secularization of society was supposed to free people from religion, yet individuals are converting en masse to fundamentalist faiths, such as Protestant evangelicalism, Islamic Salafism, and Haredi Judaism. These religions either reconnect adherents to their culture through casual referents, like halal fast food, or 'deculturate' through 'purification' rituals, such as speaking in tongues, a practice that allows believers to utter a language entirely their own. Instead of a return to traditional religious worship, we are now witnessing the individualization of faith and the disassociation of faith communities from ethnic and national identities. This has placed culturally integrated religions, such as Catholicism and eastern orthodox Christianity, on the defensive, and presents new challenges to state and society. Roy explores the options available to powers that hope to integrate or control these groups and whether marginalization or homogenization will further divide believers from their culture" -- www.flipkart.com… (more)

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