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The Fort by Bernard Cornwell
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The Fort (edition 2010)

by Bernard Cornwell

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4331224,328 (3.52)17
Member:YossarianXeno
Title:The Fort
Authors:Bernard Cornwell
Info:London: HarperCollins, 2010. Hardback, First Edition, First Printing.
Collections:Your library, 1st Edition, Fiction, Read in 2012
Rating:***1/2
Tags:American War of Independence fiction

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The Fort by Bernard Cornwell

Recently added byCommunityAtheneum, j.schafer, private library, ChippoHQ, MrsMuir, wmorton38
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Enjoyed this,swift moving adventure. ( )
  babybelle | Aug 2, 2013 |
what to say about this book... alot really. it was written very well and i loved how he showed what was history and how to tell what was character as you read. it has alot of information in there but by the time i was done some illusions were shattered. for example i now have to say that if rest of our military was like these then it is only because of divine intervention that we became the united states. that solomon lovell deserves to be outed as a coward and failure along with saltstall. and dare i get into paul revere?? holy crap... we won the war despite these people not with them. revere was a major coward and had a god complex the size of the u.s. i can't say enough about him except that i get angry thinking about all the crap they tell us in school that is so SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO inaccurate. there are rumors about him around but this book gives a hellofa good dose of reality towards his real character. his family should be ashamed. and i don't believe in the sins of the father, but they should still be ashamed.
one last thing... why haven't we heard of general wadsworth? he should be touched on by teachers and more pronounced in our history. not just due to his courage and tenacity of this battle but due to his whole history. i run into this sort of thing alot where i get historical info that is never brought forward that is so essential to a real view or our history and am amazed that it isn't ever brought to light. ok, maybe in revere's place they needed a hero, but we don't anymore. the more i learn history the more i learn the travisties of those hidden that deserve and or should be brought to light. the winners write history and usually they're full of shit. ( )
1 vote krushkelsey | Apr 21, 2013 |
This wasn't a particularly engaging book and I had a lot of trouble keeping my focus when I read it. While it seemed to be a good fictional account of the event, it lacked any kind of characterization, a protagonist or anything really concrete to make me want to read on. It really was just an account on a particular event during the war, and after a while the lack of all the other elements to make a good story, affected my overall impression of the book.

The author writing style and research that went into this was very well done. I'm unsure how accurate to real events the story is, but it does seem authentic enough. But, it was missing a lot of crucial pieces a novel needs to make it more readable and I think that was sacrificed more than needed.

Overall not my favourite read, I will read the author again - I want to try out some of his other books, but this one was a miss for me.

Also found on my book review blog Jules' Book Reviews - The Fort ( )
  bookwormjules | Mar 29, 2013 |
Book: The Fort: A Novel of the Revolutionary War
Author: Bernard Cornwell, narrated by Robin Bowerman
Characters: John Moore and Paul Revere
Setting: 1770’s Colonial America
Theme: War heros
Genre: Children’s historical fiction
Audience: ages 15 and up
Curriculum: American History class
Summary: Narrator talks about the historical events that take place that began the American Revolution. There is a great emphasis on the travel of the war and it’s effects on American people. It also emphasizes on John Moore and Paul Revere as the heros.
Personal Response:
This was a book I found in under the children’s genre,but I found it to be more appropriate for high school or older. This is a story intended for those who enjoy and love history especially the Revolutionary War. I also enjoyed the telling of how the roles of John Moore and Paul Revere as heros, almost like Greek Mythology but with an American twist. ( )
  Je2nif4 | Mar 9, 2013 |
A fascinating look at the making of American history.

Among other adventures the book highlights the dramatic failings of American Hero Paul Revere in his one and only military endevour. Bernard Cornwell looks into; “...the often enormous gap between myth and reality.”

“The gap is understandable when we're dealing with a quasi-historical figure like King Arthur who, if he exised at all, flourished in an age when record keeping was almost non-existent, but how could that happen to a man like Paul Revere who lived in an age of literacy and at a time when history was being recorded by newspapers, official records and diarists? The answer, of course, is that myth is more powerful than truth, and myth is necessary.”

So, there were great American heros at Majabigwaduce but, according to their records, Revere was not one of them. Not until years later when Longfellow wrote him into his mythical poem. ( )
  Novak | Sep 1, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
There are obvious parallels in Cornwell’s tale with contemporary events in modern America. We owe it to ourselves and our posterity to re-examine the actual events of the Revolution and redeem the lives of those Americans who suffered and died in miserable, out-of-the-way places like the Penobscot. Let’s skip the varnish on the statue in the town square and instead listen to the truths of the lives and deaths of the men whom that statue memorializes. Bernard Cornwell, British by birth, has served up a delicious dish of gray truth. That, friends, is love for our great nation.
 
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The Fort is dedicated, with great admiration, to Colonel John Wessmiller, US Army (Retired), who would have known just what to do.
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There was not much wind so the ships headed sluggishly upriver.
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After the British establish a fort on the Penobscot River, the Massachusetts patriots--among them General Peleg Wadsworth and Colonel Paul Revere--mount an expedition to oust the redcoats.

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