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The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm by Nancy…

The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm (original 1994; edition 2012)

by Nancy Farmer

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1,795413,902 (4)45
Title:The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm
Authors:Nancy Farmer
Info:Scholastic Paperbacks (2012), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 336 pages
Collections:To read
Tags:Children's/YA Literature, Novels/Novellas

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The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm by Nancy Farmer (1994)


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Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
Exciting adventure set in Zimbabwe in 2194. Also deftly explores the clash of historical traditions with the future technologies & societies. Lots of page-turning action and well-developed characters, plus lively dialogue and a good sprinkling of humor. Not just for children (ages 11 up), or just for science fiction fans. ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Apr 14, 2015 |
A great young adult book, solid from start to finish. Set in 2194, science fiction and fantasy blend almost seamlessly. Three children, led by Tendai, an almost-14 year old, escape from the over-protective father, the feared but mostly benevolent General Matsika, to go on an adventure in a Zimbabwe that is half very modern and half very ancient. Kidnapped almost immediately, their story makes about about 60% of the book. The other 40% goes to the Ear, the Eye, and the Arm of the title -- three mutants with enhanced senses who run a down and out detective agency. Part of the delight of the book is the rich variety of places, characters, and mythology that contextualize the tale. Farmer manages to do this with a minimum of info-dumps. There's a brief glossary cum history at the end that, like the glossary added to some editions of Clockwork Orange, serves mostly to confirm what you've already inferred in reading. The other delight is Farmer's ability to occasionally make her world more real through a casual phrase or observation.

Highly recommended. ( )
1 vote ChrisRiesbeck | Mar 30, 2015 |
It's got a playful sort of spirit about it with impossible coincidences happening all the time and funny turns of phrase. "Fancy show cats yawned contemptuously at the crowds that milled around them."

A neighborhood of ancient plastic trash that is alive with zombie-like people lies directly adjacent to a walled neighborhood sized-country that is not even part of the world where ancient village life continues purposefully unmolested by the modern world.

Tailing three missing children through the plot are three total weirdos with special abilities caused by a long ago toxic waste spill. "I think we're pretty nice," but they're enough to give even the most hardened city criminals pause yet they end up raising an unwanted witch-twin.

It's a long journey but all that began with the quest for a boy scout badge ends well.
  knownever | Dec 28, 2014 |
  mrsforrest | Oct 15, 2014 |
In Zimbabwe in the year 2194, the children of a high-ranking general are kidnapped and a trio of detectives with special abilities is on the case. I can't remember any other book set in the future of Africa; it's a continent science fiction seems to ignore, so this is an interesting change of pace, written by an author who lived in Zimbabwe for many years. The story is an exploration of the capitol city as the children make their way through an irradiated garbage dump, a walled-off enclave filled with separatists living in a village of the past, a robot-riddled English home, and a mile-high hotel arcology. The detectives are mutants with the powers of super-sight, super-hearing, and super-sensitivity, which makes their part of the story a bit reminiscent of a fairy tale like The Six Who Went Far. Best for older kids, as there's some very scary (and fairly gory) stuff, though it doesn't get too explicitly descriptive. ( )
  PlasticAtoms | Feb 22, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Nancy Farmerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Daniel Farmer - born in Resthaven
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Someone was standing by his bed, a person completely unlike anyone Tendai had ever met.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140376410, Paperback)

In Zimbabwe in the year 2194, General Matsika calls in Africa's most unusual detectives--the Ear, the Eye, and the Arm--to find his missing children. By the author of Do You Know Me. Reprint. K. AB.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:37 -0400)

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In 2194 in Zimbabwe, General Matsika's three children are kidnapped and put to work in a plastic mine while three mutant detectives use their special powers to search for them.

(summary from another edition)

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