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Delirium by Lauren Oliver
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Delirium (edition 2012)

by Lauren Oliver

Series: Delirium (1)

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3,1754121,763 (3.97)140
Member:SML95
Title:Delirium
Authors:Lauren Oliver
Info:HarperCollins (2012), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 480 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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Delirium by Lauren Oliver

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English (408)  German (3)  Spanish (2)  Italian (1)  All languages (414)
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3 ½ Stars

The publisher description of the book summarize pretty well what the book it’s about.
Is set in United States in the future, in a society where love is forbidden and seen as an illness call “amor deliria nervosa”. A society in which every bad thing that ever happened in the world is blame on the deadly decease that Love was.

In the book we meet Lena, who grew up in this society and is eagerly awaiting for her procedure, The Cure, that will cured her forever of getting infected by Deliria (Love), taking from her all her emotions, feelings and anything related to love and affection. The procedure is always done at the 18th birthday, she’s 3 months away. After the surgery all past experiences will lose importance, all friendships and relationships will become like blurs of the past, but she will be cured and will live a life of happiness, order and stability.

All teenagers before graduation are also submit to an Evaluation in which a panel of evaluators decide what you are going to study, who are you going to marry and how many kids you can have. During her Evaluation Lena sees Alex for the first time, who would become her romantic counterpart.

In the book we also meet Hana, Lana’s best friend, and also a product of that society, but with a little bit more curiosity than Lena. Hana infiltrates the world of non-cured, invalids and sympathizers, showing us an underworld society, that lives parallel to the general population of Portland.

The novel is a little bit stereotypical and predictable, girl (Lena) meets boy (Alex) and of course Alex is an Invalid or not cured. As expected Lena gets infected of deliria (falls in love) and starts to reevaluate all her believes and defy society.
This is a dystopian Romeo and Juliet novel. Two young characters that fall in love but their love is prohibited, in this case not by their families but by a repressive social system, with a total lack of individual freedom.

The world Lauren Oliver creates is good but not enough, there were more things that should have been explained about the world that were not. The romance between the main characters is not well developed and their relationship lacks deep. I didn’t get a real sense of who Alex really was and what they (Lana and Alex) love about each other.

Oliver’s writing is impeccable; but the first third of the book the pace was very slow, nothing was happening and it was hard for me to get through it. After that point the pace starts to pick up, towards the end pages it becomes a page turner, ending in a cliffhanger, that will leave you wanting to get your hands in the next installment, “Pandemonium” as soon as is published.

The book is good but it could have been amazing, I hope Ms. Oliver continue with the pace of the last past pages in Pandemonium, I’m sure I’ll read it. I want to know what will happen to the characters and how are they going to be develop. I also expect to know more about the world and see more of the support characters.
If you like dystopian novels you would like this one, I also recommended it to YA readers.

Favorite Quotes:
I carry your heart, I carry it on my heart.

I press my hands against my chest, wishing I could somehow be even closer to him. I hate skin. I hate bones and bodies. I want to be curl up inside of him and be carried there forever. (creepy I know, but I like it.) ( )
  BookaholicCat | Mar 4, 2015 |
Love as a disease to be "cured" for the betterment of society! That intrigues me! This is a well-thought through introduction to a society that we (the reader) only beings to scratch the surface of. While we read of Lena and her family, we learn of the societies restrictions. Much like The Hunger Games and Divergent, you know there is much more to learn of this society's ways and means. The whys and the wherefores. The rhyme and the reason. I look forward to continuing with Pandemonium.

Do you like dystopian societies? Do you like YA? You'll like this!
( )
  olongbourn | Mar 1, 2015 |
This book/series poses a very interesting concept: Is love a disease? Is love the cause of all of the worlds problems, something to be eradicated, feared? Or can love truly exist as a beautiful thing, in a world where people coexist harmoniously? Does love have to mean pain and heartache, or can love be happiness and joy?

In the beginning, I almost felt like maybe Lena was a bit shallow and self-centered. She just wanted the cure. The same cure that did all of those horrible things to her mother and took everything away from her. But she didn't see it that way. She saw it as salvation. If only she really knew what she was signing up for, huh?

Hana was the ultimate party girl and probably one of my favorite characters in the book.

The evolution of this characters and the world-building that took place was amazing. I felt instantly connected to the story. It takes place in the current time, but in an alternate world. I could so easily picture that being the true case as we watch the news debate gay marriage and things like that that define what is right and just and moral in the world. Because, of course, we fear the unknown. We are taught that that which is different or not the same as everything else, the unknown, is frightening and scary and something to be avoided at all costs, right?

But there is a beauty underneath the story, in the subtext, that you almost have to dig deep to see. It is so worth it though. I urge every teenager, every adult, every HUMAN to read this book. It will make you look at things in a whole new light, and re-evaluate everything you have ever known about love and relationships. It was utterly mind-blowing. ( )
  destinyisntfree | Feb 28, 2015 |
This book/series poses a very interesting concept: Is love a disease? Is love the cause of all of the worlds problems, something to be eradicated, feared? Or can love truly exist as a beautiful thing, in a world where people coexist harmoniously? Does love have to mean pain and heartache, or can love be happiness and joy?

In the beginning, I almost felt like maybe Lena was a bit shallow and self-centered. She just wanted the cure. The same cure that did all of those horrible things to her mother and took everything away from her. But she didn't see it that way. She saw it as salvation. If only she really knew what she was signing up for, huh?

Hana was the ultimate party girl and probably one of my favorite characters in the book.

The evolution of this characters and the world-building that took place was amazing. I felt instantly connected to the story. It takes place in the current time, but in an alternate world. I could so easily picture that being the true case as we watch the news debate gay marriage and things like that that define what is right and just and moral in the world. Because, of course, we fear the unknown. We are taught that that which is different or not the same as everything else, the unknown, is frightening and scary and something to be avoided at all costs, right?

But there is a beauty underneath the story, in the subtext, that you almost have to dig deep to see. It is so worth it though. I urge every teenager, every adult, every HUMAN to read this book. It will make you look at things in a whole new light, and re-evaluate everything you have ever known about love and relationships. It was utterly mind-blowing. ( )
  destinyisntfree | Feb 28, 2015 |
Actual rating: 3.5

“You can't be happy unless you're unhappy sometimes"

[a:Lauren Oliver|2936493|Lauren Oliver|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/authors/1291156327p2/2936493.jpg] has a way with words. Everything that flows from those creative fingertips enchants you and whisks you away to another world. This is one of the reasons she's one of my favourite authors.

So when I picked up [b:Delirium|11614718|Delirium (Delirium, #1)|Lauren Oliver|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1327890411s/11614718.jpg|10342808] I was exciting to drown myself within those pages and take part in a different world.

That's where the shit hit the fan, to put it nicely.

Lena lives in a world where love is a disease:

"The deadliest of all deadly things: It kills you both when you have it and when you don't."

It destroys lives and when someone is infected they are alienated from their lives:

"...diseased girls dragging their nails on the pavement, tearing out their hair, their mouths dripping spit."

So the Consortium created a way to remove the 'disease' altogether. On the 18th birthday of every child, they will go through a procedure, where the part of their brain that feels love is cut away in surgery.

Lena is all for the procedure. Counting down the days, excited, she cannot wait to get it over and done with, and to finally meet her pair and get married and live the life that was set out for her.

But if things went according to plan, would it be a novel?



Lena

Lena is a pain in the ass. For the first 30% of this book, she continuously commented on her best friend, Hana's, appearance and how plain, boring and ugly she felt in comparison:

"She'll retreat to the West End and make friends with her neighbors, with people richer and more sophisticated than I am. I'll stay in some crappy apartment on Cumberland, and I won't miss her, or remember what it felt like to run side by side."

"But a second later I feel their eyes sweeping past me, a wind, latching on to Hana. Her blonde hair flashes next to me, a coin in the sun."

"Or at least, I must look ridiculous. Hana looks like a model for athletic wear."

"Not pretty. Not ugly, either. Just plain, like a thousand other faces you would see on the street."

And my personal favourite:

"No guy in his right mind would ever choose me when there are people like Hana in the world: it would be like settling for a stale cookie when what you really want is a big bowl of ice cream, whipped cream and cherries and chocolate sprinkles included."



For this reason alone, I found it nearly impossible to like her. Not only did she constantly complain about the unfairness of her life, but her fear of being caught and thrown into the Crypts (the asylum/prison) keeps her from doing anything even remotely rebellious. It's her best friend, Hana, who introduces her to the world of 'freedom' -- or the limited freedom of downloading illegal music and going to raves after curfew.

But would it be a typical cheesy novel if Oliver didn't introduce a love interest?



Alex

Alex is an 'Invalid': a member of a large group of people who managed to escape the suffocation of the new laws and made a home for themselves in the Wilds:

"They're not even supposed to exist; supposedly, all the people who live in the Wilds were destroyed fifty years ago, during the blitz."

They're a myth, a scary story to terrify children:

"Mama, Mama, put me to bed
I won't make it home, I'm already half-dead.
I met an Invalid, and fell for his art
He showed me his smile, and went straight for my heart.
"

But although Alex is an Invalid and therefore someone Lena must avoid and resist at all costs, she falls head over heels in love with his syrup colour eyes and golden crown of hair.




Together, they create a plan to try and escape to the Wilds, so that they can live happily ever after.

Personally, I didn't like Alex very much. He wasn't very believable or concrete as a character: I couldn't imagine him, let alone imagine being in his shoes. He constantly pushes the boundaries. So when at the end he is shot to smithereens, I couldn't bring myself to feel too sorry for him. By that point, I was bored out of my face.

The story:

The story had great premise, and Lauren Oliver was very clever with the concept: What would a world without love be like? Although it was cleverly done, I just could not for the life of my imagine living there (which is a big must when I'm reading dystopia) and I couldn't for the life of me sympathise with Lena. The first half was incredibly slow and rather bland, constantly yet slowly building up towards a large climax which, when it came, left me disappointed.

However, I DID enjoy reading it. It was a quick read (once you hit 50%) and it had quite a few outcomes I wasn't expecting.

Over all, 3.5 stars.



( )
  Aly_Locatelli | Jan 26, 2015 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lauren Oliverprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Drew, SarahNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Finnish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Kaikille niille, jotka ovat joskus tartuttaneet minuun
amor deliria nervosan –
tiedätte kyllä, keitä olette.
Ja niille, jotka tartutatte minut tulevaisuudessa –
en malta odottaa nähdäkseni keitä te olette.
Ja kummassakin tapauksessa:
Kiitos.
First words
It has been sixty-four years since the president and the Consortium identified love as a disease, and forty-three since the scientists perfected a cure.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Information from the Finnish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.

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Book description
There was a time when love was the most important thing in the world. People would go to the end of the earth to find it. They would tell lies for it. Even kill for it.

Then, at last, they found the cure.

Now, everything is different. Scientists are able to eradicate love, and the government demands that all citizens receive the cure upon turning eighteen. Lena Haloway has always looked forward to the day when she’ll be cured. A life without love is a life without pain: safe, measured, predictable, and happy.

But then, with only ninety-five days left until her treatment, Lena does the unthinkable
Haiku summary
Love is bad for you.
A cure is necessary.
Will Lena survive?
{wegc}

No descriptions found.

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Lena looks forward to receiving the government-mandated cure that prevents the delirium of love and leads to a safe, predictable, and happy life, until ninety-five days before her eighteenth birthday and her treatment, she falls in love.

(summary from another edition)

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