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The Haj by Leon Uris
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The Haj (1984)

by Leon Uris

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Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
A bit disappointing, I enjoyed his earlier books; and I was looking forward to this onbe. The characte5rizations were a bot foo complicated ....and after a while you kind of lost interest in whos'who... I kind of liked the descriptions of the settings and historical context, though. ( )
  JosephKing6602 | Jul 29, 2014 |
It took me a long time to finish reading this book. Not because I disliked it or because it was difficult to read, but just because I wanted to take in the story and learn something.

Having said that, I must add immediately, that it has veen ages since I learnt something about the Palestinian history or the founding of Israel. I'm not qualified to agree or disagree with the historical facts as presented. Wgat is written, sounds plausible, and I keep it at that.

Being not only a book on historical facts but also on one family's survival in the turmoil, the book is mostly about human emotions and the powers tgat drive them: ambition, pride, ingenuity, friendship, betrayal, love, but foremost there is hatred.

Having read this book, I am once again robbed of an illusion (the hope that some day the conflict about colonization, now the wall, who's to blame for everything, the one that has always been there as long as I live) could possibly be solved one day.

But... nevertheless I'm one great story richer. ( )
  BoekenTrol71 | Mar 21, 2014 |
The Haj by Leon Uris

The Haj

By Leon Uris

Publisher: Doubleday and Company

Published In: Garden City, New York

Date: 1984

Pgs: 566

Summary:

This is the story of Haj Ibrahim and his son Ishmael, the muktar and likely successor to the leadership of the village of Tabah. It is the story of their lives from the turn of the century through the birth of Israel and the subsequent wars, exile, and more wars. It’s the story of people unable to escape their cultural imperatives.

Genre: Historical fiction, history

Main Character:

Ishmael

Favorite Character:

Ursula, the post WW2 German refugee who finds work selling her body and her skills among the Arab rich and elite through the early and middle parts of the book.

Least Favorite Character:

Haj Ibrahim. He fails at every turn to reach beyond his scope. He rises to many challenges and challengers, but fails to have his reach go beyond his grasp for what he truly wants throughout the book.

Favorite Scene:

The scenes where the family escapes the refugee squalor of Nabulus and hides in the caves at Qumran. In this section of the book, the family functions without the additional outside influences of culture and politics. At different points, the author had various characters long for a return to the Bedouin lifestyle. The way this section reads, these characters should have.

Plot Holes/Out of Character:

The ending is rushed for some reason. Ishmael’s fate, specifically, doesn’t fit with the character as he is written through the previous 99.99% of the book.

Last Page Sound:

You’ve got to be kidding me. I read 566 pages to be given this last page. Meh.

Author Assessment:

This was my second Uris book. The Exodus disappointed me with its pacing and scene structure. This one is an incredible book…until you read the last page. I doubt I’ll be reading any more of Mr. Uris’s books.

Disposition of Book:

Half Price Book it. ( )
  texascheeseman | May 23, 2012 |
NIL
  rustyoldboat | May 28, 2011 |
A caricature is an image of something where the form is quickly recognisable, but where the some features are exaggerated. This is probably the case with many works of historical fiction, and almost certainly the case with this book - although I have no way of telling. In this context this is quite a disturbing book to read, but in the background I found myself asking surely it's not so bad. Surely people do not behave like this to each other? Fathers would not treat their children so horribly, would they? And yet, we do see the endless bitter conflict that occurs even today in many regions. We do hear about the way that families treat daughters that 'dishonour' the family, the father, the brothers - yes it still happens in 'western' countries to which people of this culture have moved to.
In terms of history, this book covers the period of the first half of the 20th century, when the British and French were moving, or trying to move, out of the Eastern Mediterranean areas (what we now know as Israel, Jordan, Iraq etc.), and when the Jewish people in Europe were trying to build an independent life. It focuses on a family in a village east of Jerusalem located close to a new kibbutz. The book follows them as they are displaced by the conflict, as a likely image of how many families and people were displaced.
It's a long book, and then ending is worth reflecting on. Is it biased? Probably - we are come with our prejudices. I took it as impetus to read more about the topic. (Warning- there are some quite graphic violent and sexual scenes and language.) ( )
  robeik | Dec 23, 2010 |
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Young Ibrahim quietly took his place at his father's bedside, watching the old man wheeze out his final scene.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553248642, Mass Market Paperback)

Leon Uris retums to the land of his acclaimed  best-seller Exodus for an epic  story of hate and love, vengeance and forgiveness and  forgiveness. The Middle East is the powerful  setting for this sweeping tale of a land where revenge  is sacred and hatred noble. Where an Arab ruler  tries to save his people from destruction but  cannot save them from themselves. When violence  spreads like a plague across the lands of  Palestine--this is the time of The  Haj.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:32 -0400)

The Middle East is the powerful setting for this sweeping tale of a land where revenge is sacred and hatred noble. Where an Arab ruler tries to save his people from destruction but cannot save them from themselves.

» see all 2 descriptions

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