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Everyone Plays at the Library: Creating…
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Everyone Plays at the Library: Creating Great Gaming Experiences for All… (edition 2010)

by Scott Nicholson

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Member:rjmoir
Title:Everyone Plays at the Library: Creating Great Gaming Experiences for All Ages
Authors:Scott Nicholson
Info:Information Today, Inc. (2010), Edition: 1, Paperback, 240 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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Everyone Plays at the Library: Creating Great Gaming Experiences for All Ages by Scott Nicholson

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Breaking down the reasons why games belong in the library, the kinds of games libraries might use to best serve their missions, and the nitty-gritty of putting on a gaming event, Scott Nicholson's book is packed with information about, and examples of, gaming, not limited to video games. The majority of the books focuses on explaining the 5 broad kinds of games one could implement in the library setting, namely Knowledge, Strategy, Action, Narrative and Social games. Each section provides examples of various subgenres of these kinds of games, and some speculation of ways they could be used in a library. Nicholson provides game profiles, including costs, complexity, demographics and required time to play for many of the most popular games mentioned through the book, invaluable for planning gaming events. While this book provides in-depth, well explained information for the librarian who is less familiar with gaming, a librarian looking for more specific ideas may be somewhat disappointed by the relatively small number of pages dedicated specifically to event planning. The information regarding event planning, however, contains insightful tips both theoretical and down-and-dirty practical (such as encasing a gaming console in a cardboard box with holes cut in it, to make stealing game disks discreetly more difficult). This book thus provides information relevant to librarians of all stripes, gamers and "newbs" alike, and comes highly recommended. ( )
  rjmoir | Dec 4, 2012 |
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