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The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde
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The Last Dragonslayer (edition 2010)

by Jasper Fforde

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,061827,907 (3.86)117
Member:jfoster_sf
Title:The Last Dragonslayer
Authors:Jasper Fforde
Info:Hodder & Stoughton (2010), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 281 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:**1/2
Tags:magic, dragons, humor, 10 and up

Work details

The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde

  1. 50
    Dark Lord of Derkholm by Diana Wynne Jones (LongDogMom)
    LongDogMom: Similar style and filled with magic, strange beasts and wizards in an imaginary land.
  2. 20
    Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotson (LongDogMom)
    LongDogMom: YA but similar style of writing and content (about magic, wizards, witches etc.)
  3. 10
    Too Many Curses by A. Lee Martinez (LongDogMom)
    LongDogMom: Similar humourous style and also about wizards and magic.
  4. 10
    Enchanted Glass by Diana Wynne Jones (casvelyn)
    casvelyn: Similar tone and worldbuilding
  5. 01
    Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo (4leschats)
    4leschats: Both books have an ordinary human girl who is orphaned but learns that she has great power to change the world.
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Showing 1-5 of 81 (next | show all)
OMG I love Jasper Fforde! He is one of those authors that I know I will enjoy, but for some crazy reason, do not ravenously consume when he has a new book. When I walked the isle's of BEA I paused when I saw his name. Honestly, bless the Welsh for their odd looking names. It never fails to grab my attention. This book is full of whimsy. That's the best way to describe Fforde's work: whimsical. He uses fantasy and whimsy to show the world and mock it. The world of The Last Dragon Slayer is 2011 in the sense of technology, politics, corporate manipulations, people's entitlement, etc. The only difference is that it isn't our world. There is magic, Dragons, Quarkbeasts, Trolls and more. Fforde does not take his magic out of the world, he blends it together.
I flew through this book. I picked it up on night before going to bed and then finished it the next night. I only stopped reading because I had to sleep, go to work and meet people for dinner. This book is an easy read because it is a young adult book and because Fforde is easy to read. He can be wordy, but it's in the whimsical way. Sometimes I would read a few lines and think about how I would do that if I were writing for National Novel Writing Month. For example: Gordon can Gordon Gordonson ap Gordon-Gordon of Gordon is totally a name I would use to extend my word count. That's not why Fforde did it, but still, he did it.
There were things I wish I understood better during the reading of this book. There are characters call Berzerkers that play an important role, but are never really explained in the novel. For all the history we get of magic, dragons and other creatures that aren't as important, Fforde fails to explains some important things adequately. I understand this is a series and something he will hopefully address later, but I am not sure how long it will be before i pick up that sequel.
Who will enjoy this: people who enjoy fantasy, whimsey and Fforde's fans. This is something adults can read with teens and enjoy. ( )
  librarygurl | Oct 6, 2014 |
OMG I love Jasper Fforde! He is one of those authors that I know I will enjoy, but for some crazy reason, do not ravenously consume when he has a new book. When I walked the isle's of BEA I paused when I saw his name. Honestly, bless the Welsh for their odd looking names. It never fails to grab my attention. This book is full of whimsy. That's the best way to describe Fforde's work: whimsical. He uses fantasy and whimsy to show the world and mock it. The world of The Last Dragon Slayer is 2011 in the sense of technology, politics, corporate manipulations, people's entitlement, etc. The only difference is that it isn't our world. There is magic, Dragons, Quarkbeasts, Trolls and more. Fforde does not take his magic out of the world, he blends it together.
I flew through this book. I picked it up on night before going to bed and then finished it the next night. I only stopped reading because I had to sleep, go to work and meet people for dinner. This book is an easy read because it is a young adult book and because Fforde is easy to read. He can be wordy, but it's in the whimsical way. Sometimes I would read a few lines and think about how I would do that if I were writing for National Novel Writing Month. For example: Gordon can Gordon Gordonson ap Gordon-Gordon of Gordon is totally a name I would use to extend my word count. That's not why Fforde did it, but still, he did it.
There were things I wish I understood better during the reading of this book. There are characters call Berzerkers that play an important role, but are never really explained in the novel. For all the history we get of magic, dragons and other creatures that aren't as important, Fforde fails to explains some important things adequately. I understand this is a series and something he will hopefully address later, but I am not sure how long it will be before i pick up that sequel.
Who will enjoy this: people who enjoy fantasy, whimsey and Fforde's fans. This is something adults can read with teens and enjoy. ( )
  librarygurl | Oct 6, 2014 |
Jenny Strange is the manager of Kazam, a pseudo-company pseudo-family where magicians and wizards are hired out for odd jobs to get enough income to stay afloat. In a world where magic is slowly decaying to trickles of power and there is only one last dragon in the world, change is coming. And at the heart of it all, Jenny Strange will be catalyst as she strives to keep everyone in her responsibility afloat, but also to do the right thing.

I loved this book. It reads almost like a children's book or a fairy tale, but with a very down-to-earth modern feel. And it is not childish at all. I loved the nods to fairy tales and old myths and punny twists on those references. I loved the strong protagonist, the way the plot progressed, and the world building. That's basically everything a book needs to succeed.

Jenny Strange is a great protagonist to follow. She is strong enough to rely on her wits, but have enough support from friends and pets to not be a completely arrogant heroine. She's witty and clever without being obnoxious or perfect. The supporting cast is all quite interesting as well. I suppose one quibble I had was with the villains for just being too much of a stereotype: but that resolved itself near the end of the book and I am left with an overall very positive impression of all the characters.

The plot progressed nicely - it was engaging, gave information in a way that wasn't condescending or a info-dump. Everything flowed. Well done.

The world. It was believable. I loved it, this modern yet archaic Earth that has magic, but is still concerned about drain pipes. Magic carpets, but used for delivering pizza or organs. A king to rule, but companies lobbying for a celebrity face. It's lovely and wonderful, with a touch of whimsy.

I just want to say... I love the ending. Beautiful. A little short, a little abrupt, but everything I would hope an ending is.

Three and a half stars because I really did like it and it's better than the average fiction book. But rounded down because I probably won't reread it again. It's not really a re-readable book because a lot of engaging moments hinges on the way information is presented and the plot twists that happen.
Recommended for people who like a bit of whimsy in their books, or for those that want something light and fun to read. Also definitely recommended for people who like fairy tales and a touch of magic. Ah, I'd probably recommend it for anyone who really enjoyed Ella Enchanted and grew up somewhat (just a little more adult). Worth reading. Really. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
Jenny Strange is the manager of Kazam, a pseudo-company pseudo-family where magicians and wizards are hired out for odd jobs to get enough income to stay afloat. In a world where magic is slowly decaying to trickles of power and there is only one last dragon in the world, change is coming. And at the heart of it all, Jenny Strange will be catalyst as she strives to keep everyone in her responsibility afloat, but also to do the right thing.

I loved this book. It reads almost like a children's book or a fairy tale, but with a very down-to-earth modern feel. And it is not childish at all. I loved the nods to fairy tales and old myths and punny twists on those references. I loved the strong protagonist, the way the plot progressed, and the world building. That's basically everything a book needs to succeed.

Jenny Strange is a great protagonist to follow. She is strong enough to rely on her wits, but have enough support from friends and pets to not be a completely arrogant heroine. She's witty and clever without being obnoxious or perfect. The supporting cast is all quite interesting as well. I suppose one quibble I had was with the villains for just being too much of a stereotype: but that resolved itself near the end of the book and I am left with an overall very positive impression of all the characters.

The plot progressed nicely - it was engaging, gave information in a way that wasn't condescending or a info-dump. Everything flowed. Well done.

The world. It was believable. I loved it, this modern yet archaic Earth that has magic, but is still concerned about drain pipes. Magic carpets, but used for delivering pizza or organs. A king to rule, but companies lobbying for a celebrity face. It's lovely and wonderful, with a touch of whimsy.

I just want to say... I love the ending. Beautiful. A little short, a little abrupt, but everything I would hope an ending is.

Three and a half stars because I really did like it and it's better than the average fiction book. But rounded down because I probably won't reread it again. It's not really a re-readable book because a lot of engaging moments hinges on the way information is presented and the plot twists that happen.
Recommended for people who like a bit of whimsy in their books, or for those that want something light and fun to read. Also definitely recommended for people who like fairy tales and a touch of magic. Ah, I'd probably recommend it for anyone who really enjoyed Ella Enchanted and grew up somewhat (just a little more adult). Worth reading. Really. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
If you're familiar with the Thursday Next series then I don't have to say anything more because you've probably already read this series as well. For those just hearing the name of Jasper Fforde, my advice is skip this one and go straight to The Eyre Affair. Jasper's quirky style is redone as a light, young adult story of a modern setting where magic remained somewhat and enters a quest of whodunnit as a dragonslayer. Personally, I found it too light drifting into the shallow and extremely predictable in several places. The author can do so much better than this. ( )
  revslick | Jul 9, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jasper Ffordeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Janson, AlexCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kettner, ChristineCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robinson, Nicola L.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Stella Morrel
1897-1933
2010 -
The grandmother I never knew
The daughter I will
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Once, I was famous.
Quotations
"Quark," said the Quarkbeast.

"Did we really have to bring the beast?" Full Price asked me.

"It jumped in the car when I opened the door."

The Quarkbeast yawned, revealing several rows of razor-sharp fangs. Despite his placid nature, the beast's ferocious appearance almost guaranteed that no one ever completely shrugged off the possibility that he might try to take a chunk out of them when they weren't looking. If the Quarkbeast was aware of this, it didn't show. Indeed, he might have been so unaware that he wondered why people always ran away screaming.

"Quark," said the Quarkbeast.

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"Fifteen-year-old Jennifer Strange runs an agency for underemployed magicians in a world where magic is fading away, but when visions of the death of the world's last dragon begin, all signs point to Jennifer--and Big Magic"--

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