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Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of…
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Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our…

by Stephen L. Macknik

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Showing 5 of 5
Great book, easy read, neuro-scientists use stage magic (illusions) to explain how the brain perceives (and often
mis-perceives) reality.

SPOILER ALEART: The secrets behind many tricks are revealed, but these are clearly marked in the text, so you can skip them if you which, but that would be missing the point of the book. ( )
  bke | Mar 30, 2014 |
These people named their kid ' Iago ' ( what does neuroscience have to say about that ) { Interesting but despite their claim in the introduction, I doubt this kind of stuff is going to be what solves the problem of consciousness and cracks the neural code. But every bit helps ! ) ( )
  BakuDreamer | Sep 7, 2013 |
Fascinating and very readable. The authors' enthusiasm for the subject matter is infectious and made for easy reading. Using magic to explain neuroscience was a genius stroke. ( )
  mazeway | Mar 28, 2013 |
Work on attention and distraction (gorillas in our midst, if you’ve read about that experiment) as translated through what working magicians already know about how to distract people or create visual illusions through appropriately sequenced movement. My favorite result in this book: it turns out that people susceptible to hypnosis can be hypnotized so that, when they hear a triggering sound, they see words as mere gibberish. This allows them to perform really well on the Stroop test because they see only colors, not conflicting color words; people who aren’t susceptible to hypnosis are unimproved. We still don’t know exactly what’s going on with hypnosis, but there’s something; if it’s an illusion, it’s a real one. ( )
  rivkat | Jan 23, 2013 |
For insight into magic and more insight into the way your mind works, read "Sleights of Mind." The information about focus and multitasking has stuck with me the most. The data shows that I should focus on the task at hand, especially doing something unpredictable and potentially dangerous such as driving. Our minds like to perceive that driving is predictable (the roadway will be clear, other drivers will follow the rules of the road) which makes us vulnerable to unpredictably. The epilogue of practical implications from the neuroscience is a handy summary. ( )
  VaterOlsen | Apr 8, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805092811, Hardcover)

"This book doesn't just promise to change the way you think about sleight of hand and David Copperfield—it will also change the way you think about the mind." —Jonah Lehrer, author of How We Decide and Proust Was A Neuroscientist

Stephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde, the founders of the exciting new discipline of neuromagic, have convinced some of the world's greatest magicians to allow scientists to study their techniques for tricking the brain. This book is the result of the authors' yearlong, world-wide exploration of magic and how its principles apply to our behavior. Magic tricks fool us because humans have hardwired processes of attention and awareness that are hackable—a good magician uses your mind's own intrinsic properties against you in a form of mental jujitsu.

Now magic can reveal how our brains work in everyday situations. For instance, if you've ever bought an expensive item you'd sworn you'd never buy, the salesperson was probably a master at creating the "illusion of choice," a core technique of magic. The implications of neuromagic go beyond illuminating our behavior; early research points to new approaches for everything from the diagnosis of autism to marketing techniques and education. Sleights of Mind makes neuroscience fun and accessible by unveiling the key connections between magic and the mind.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:34:02 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Stephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde, the founders of the new discipline of neuromagic, have convinced some of the world's greatest magicians to allow scientists to study their techniques for tricking the brain. This book is the result of the authors' yearlong, world-wide exploration of magic and how its principles apply to our behavior. Magic tricks fool us because humans have hardwired processes of attention and awareness that are hackable--a good magician uses your mind's own intrinsic properties against you. Now magic can reveal how our brains work in everyday situations. For instance, if you've ever bought an expensive item you'd sworn you'd never buy, the salesperson was probably a master at creating the "illusion of choice," a core technique of magic. The implications of neuromagic go beyond illuminating our behavior; early research points to new approaches for everything from the diagnosis of autism to marketing techniques and education.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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