HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Middlemarch by George Eliot
Loading...

Middlemarch (original 1872; edition 2012)

by George Eliot

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
10,784171259 (4.21)14 / 1318
  1. 110
    Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell (christiguc, Hollerama)
  2. 92
    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (shallihavemydwarf)
  3. 50
    The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot (Booksloth)
  4. 30
    My Life in Middlemarch by Rebecca Mead (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: One reader's relationship with this novel; also some biography of Eliot and a literary criticism.
  5. 20
    The Getting of Wisdom by Henry Handel Richardson (thesmellofbooks)
    thesmellofbooks: The Getting of Wisdom is the rare sort of book that provokes deep self-reflection and a nudge in the direction of peace-making with self and life, and in this way brings to mind [[George Eliot]]'s [Middlemarch]. I am gobsmacked. The novel begins as an entertaining tale of a headstrong young Australian girl going to meet the world at boarding school. It gradually evolves into a subtle, simple, and stunningly real observation of the pressures of conformity and the intolerance of naïveté, which, when paired with a strong desire to be accepted, can lead to many and often rending responses in an imaginative young person. Yet it is not a tragedy. I am left moved, affectionate, a little worried about the future, and yet joyful at the intactness of the protagonist's resilient soul. Bravo, Ms Richardson.… (more)
  6. 20
    South Riding: An English Landscape by Winifred Holtby (Booksloth)
  7. 20
    The Victorian House: Domestic Life from Childbirth to Deathbed by Judith Flanders (susanbooks)
  8. 31
    North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell (PensiveCat)
  9. 03
    Ulysses by James Joyce (kara.shamy)
    kara.shamy: Similar -- almost unique really -- in their tremendous breadth and depth...
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (163)  Spanish (4)  French (2)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  All languages (171)
Showing 1-5 of 163 (next | show all)
Trying to write a simple review of Middlemarch is difficult because I am not sure where to begin. This novel was one of the best novels I have read in a long time. With many plot twists and turns George Elliot engages the reader on many levels. Beyond the plot and character development (which are superb) Elliot writes with amazing description and eloquence. She literally paints works of art with her words. If the reader is a writer or communicator in any fashion, he or she can not help but feel that they just spent 900 pages being schooled in the ways of critical engagement.

Her main story line involving Dorthea offers a modern critique to the notion that an individual must fit the societal mold to be something or be someone of importance. She shows us that it is often the obscure and unnoticed who make the world what it is. One can not help but leave this novel feeling empowered to rediscover the beauty of simplicity while living in a such a materialistic and narcissistic culture like Western Civilization.

From beginning to end it was a phenomenal book. However, the reader must pay close attention to the rhythm of Elliot's writing. She goes back and forth between various plots of the overarching story rather quickly and quietly. If the reader can stay in step with Elliot throughout the text, he or she will arrive at an ending that will surely delight and impact on many profound levels. ( )
  Noah_Schumacher | Apr 28, 2015 |
I started Middlemarch on January first and lingered over it for weeks, months, before finally finishing it off during the twenty-four hour readathon. It really wasn't until mid-book that I grew to love it, the characters, the plots, the intrigues, the small-town gossip that fueled so many difficulties. I came away with a new appreciation for the power of acting out of interest for the benefit of others, bravely, despite the possible consequences. So happy I read this book. ( )
  debnance | Apr 26, 2015 |
This novel provides a look at small-town life in Victorian times. The author tells the story of several characters and explores themes such as spirituality vs. religion, the constraints of small-town life and social expectations, idealism and what makes a successful marriage. Well written with many characters and themes to explore.

The author displays an amazing understanding of human motivations and behaviour. ( )
  LynnB | Apr 3, 2015 |
An absolutely beautiful and touching book. Eliot's characters are real and compelling, and she portrays life in all its imperfection - full of mistakes and misunderstanding, but remedied by friendship and compassion. ( )
  katieray | Mar 29, 2015 |
Reread 3/13, originally read in April, 2011. ( )
  winedrunksea | Mar 28, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 163 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (73 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eliot, Georgeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ashton, RosemaryEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Creswick, ThomasCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harvey, W. J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Woolf, GabrielNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Who that cares much to know the history of man, and how the mysterious mixture behaves under the varying experiments of Time, has not dwelt, at least briefly, on the life of Saint Theresa, has not smiled with some gentleness at the thought of the little girl waling forth one morning hand-in-hand with her still smaller brother, to go and seek martyrdom in the country of the Moors? (Prelude)
Miss Brooke had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress.
Quotations
Miss Brooke had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress.
Sane people did what their neighbors did, so that if any lunatics were at large, one might know and avoid them.
What we call our despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope.
Riding was an indulgence which she allowed herself in spite of conscientious qualms; she felt that she enjoyed it in a pagan sensuous way, and always looked forward to renouncing it.
Some discouragement, some faintness of the heart at the new real future which replaces the imaginary, is not unusual, and we do not expect people to be deeply moved by what is not unusual. That element of tragedy which lies in the very fact of frequency, has not yet wrought itself into the coarse emotions of mankind.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary
dorothea cares

in a world not quite ready

to accept her views

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0141439548, Paperback)

It was George Eliot’s ambition to create a world and portray a whole community—tradespeople, middle classes, country gentry—in the rising fictional provincial town of Middlemarch, circa 1830. Vast and crowded, rich in narrative irony and
suspense, Middlemarch is richer still in character and in its sense of how individual destinies are shaped by and shape the community.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:32:19 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Set in a provincial Victorian neighborhood, the author explores the complex social relationship and the struggle to hold fast to personal tragedy in a materialistic environment.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 26 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.21)
0.5 5
1 21
1.5 7
2 75
2.5 16
3 229
3.5 88
4 554
4.5 103
5 911

Audible.com

21 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141439548, 0141199792, 0143123815

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 97,162,898 books! | Top bar: Always visible