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Quiet : the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking (edition 2012)

by Susan Cain

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3,6692241,437 (4.04)220
Member:infopump
Title:Quiet : the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking
Authors:Susan Cain
Info:New York : Crown Publishers, c2012.
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:***
Tags:WPPL, ebooks, Kindle

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Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

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Showing 1-5 of 227 (next | show all)
I just finished the audiobook and it is brilliant. I've read a lot about introversion and the information uncovered in her research revealed topics I had not considered. The sections about high social monitoring was insightful personally as it helped me understand behaviors in my life. The free trait theory also explained why I manifest certain traits related to tasks I love that do not manifest at all in similar tasks with different goals. It does provide some insight about the extrovert species that should help introverts and extroverts understand one another. I could have done without the little climate change mini-sermon (ignore Gore and we'll "drown") but similar tangents were few and short and didn't distract from the core topic. Her articulation of the impact of Tony Robbins, Dale Carnegie, and the culture of personality shaping of the American extrovert culture was enlightening. The brief mention of the extrovert focused culture on religion with megachurches and trends towards overstimulated worship was interesting and she did a hand off to Adam McHugh and his work on introversion in religion. I highly recommend it especially if you have just recently discovered your introverted characteristics. ( )
  RhodesDavis | Aug 11, 2014 |
Susan Cain is officially one of my heroes. A self-described "shy introvert" who has managed to excel in both a profession (law) and a country (the US) that covet the "Extrovert Ideal," Cain has written a book that is part Introvert Empowerment, part self-help guide, and part psychological history. What's not to love about that?
For the introverts, this book will have you saying "ah-HA!" every few pages. For extroverts, it will serve as a valuable guide to understanding "those weird, quiet people" in your life. And for everyone in between, it will encourage further awareness of the beauty that is cerebral diversity. ( )
  TRWhittier | Aug 4, 2014 |
In a world that values extroversion and the character traits that embody it, the capabilities and benefits of an introverted personality are lost. This, argues Susan Cain, is to the detriment of society. Starting with an outline of the Extrovert Ideal and its influence on Western, and especially American, culture, Cain traces how the history of the United States led to a personality-driven culture that favors extroverts. She moves on to describe the characteristics of an introvert and how one’s placement on the introvert-extrovert spectrum impacts everything in life from the friends made to the careers preferred. Cain also studies many of the ways introverts struggle to cultivate a “pseudo-extrovert” persona to cope with others, and the ways this both benefits and hurts them at home, at work, and in the world. The final sections of the book largely focus on children and the way introversion impacts their development and growth, and how parents can help them fully realize their potential.

I’ve always figured that I must be pretty far over on the introvert spectrum, because I find other people extremely draining and prefer to work by myself when possible, so I wasn’t surprised to recognize myself in a lot of Cain’s stories. But this book is far more than a cheerleader shouting, “It’s OK to be quiet and introverted!” It’s actually a very clinical book packed with case studies that study every aspect of introverted life. I was fascinated to learn that babies who are more sensitive to external stimulation tend to become introverts, almost as if the world is too overwhelming so they have to shut it out, yet introverts also appear to be less responsive to dopamine, which makes them more cautious. Another study disproved the popular belief that open office plans, so popular in the offices of the tech companies here in Silicon Valley, are not any more effective than traditional cubicles and in some cases may even be less effective when it comes to problem solving and creative solutions.

There isn’t a lot of practical advice for introverts, but there are a few useful examples. In one chapter, Cain dissects the interactions of a couple where the husband is an extrovert and the wife is an introvert, looking at some of the problems that come up consistently in their relationship and offering proposals to help them manage. She also devotes a few pages to raising children, offering tips for both introverted and extroverted parents to help raise their kids, whether introverts or extroverts, in ways that will accept and even promote their natural talents, wherever the fall on the spectrum. ( )
  makaiju | Aug 1, 2014 |
This is definitely a book that all introverts (or parents/friends/teachers) of someone who is introverted should pick up. Lots of great studies and inspiring information in here.
  Musefall | Jul 29, 2014 |
I had a long, lovely review written for this one, but the computer stopped computing. Bah.

Anyway, this book could not be more relevant to my interests, speaking as somebody who's at the extreme end of the "I" scale. I'd been enjoying Cain's blog posts over at Psychology Today, and I was excited to hear she'd written a book.

There's so much to love here: the engaging writing, the solid research reporting, the illustrative examples, the listings of references works and additional readings. But what really earns the fifth star for me is the fact that she doesn't frame introversion as a defect, a problem, an abnormality to overcome. We simply have a different way of being, despite the best efforts of misguided people to paint us as antisocial, arrogant, shy, dull, and any number of other projected negative characteristics.

In fact, I'm wondering whether this might be a bit of a "preaching to the choir" situation--we introverts already know the value of solitude, reflection, focusing alone on a problem, and letting each person talk. The trick is getting it across to the societal infrastructure at large: schools (group work), companies (team projects; cube farms; open bullpens), and even home designers (open floor plans). As another GR reviewer said, "Introverts living in the Extrovert Ideal are like women living in a man's world." It's ill-fitting at best and downright hostile in some cases.

I recommend this book to introverts everywhere, people who think they might be introverts, and sympathetic/curious extroverts. ( )
  Pat_F. | Jul 25, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Susan Cainprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Duffy, LauraCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fedor, AaronCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mazur, KatheNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prosperi, CarloTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reitsma, Jan WillemTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wallin, BitteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
A species in which everyone was General Patton would not succeed, any more than would a race in which everyone was Vincent van Gogh. I prefer to think that the planet needs athletes, philosophers, sex symbols, painters, scientists; it needs the warmhearted, the hardhearted, the coldhearted, and the weakhearted. It needs those who can devote their lives to studying how many droplets of water are secreted by the salivary glands of dogs under which circumstances, and it needs those who can capture the passing impression of cherry blossoms in a fourteen-syllable poem or devote twenty-five pages to the dissection of a small boy's feelings as he lies in bed in the dark waiting for his mother to kiss him good night. . . . Indeed the presence of outstanding strengths presupposes that energy needed in other areas has been channeled away from them.

- Allen Shawn
Dedication
To my childhood family
First words
Introduction
The North and South of Temperament
Montgomery, Alabama. December 1, 1955. Early evening. A public bus pulls to a stop and a sensibly dressed woman in her forties gets on. She carries herself erectly, despite having spent the day bent over an ironing board in a dingy basement tailor shop at the Montgomery Fair department store. Her feet are swollen, her shoulders ache. She sits in the first row of the Colored section and watches quietly as the bus fills with riders. Until the driver orders her to give her seat to a white person.
Quotations
To ask whether it's nature or nurture ... is like asking whether a blizzard is caused by temperature or humidity.
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Book description
At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who invent and create but prefer not to pitch their own ideas; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled “quiet,” it is to introverts we owe many of the great contributions to society—from Van Gogh’s sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.

Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with the indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Susan Cain charts the rise of “the extrovert ideal” over the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects—how it helps to determine everything from how parishioners worship to who excels at Harvard Business School. And she draws on cutting-edge research on the biology and psychology of temperament to reveal how introverts can modulate their personalities according to circumstance, how to empower an introverted child, and how companies can harness the natural talents of introverts. This extraordinary book has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.
Haiku summary
Introverts are strong
their brains are just wired different
this can be a strength
(sullijo)

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At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who invent and create but prefer not to pitch their own ideas; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts we owe many of the great contributions to society--from Van Gogh's sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer. Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with the indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Susan Cain charts the rise of "the extrovert ideal" over the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects--how it helps to determine everything from how parishioners worship to who excels at Harvard Business School. And she draws on cutting-edge research on the biology and psychology of temperament to reveal how introverts can modulate their personalities according to circumstance, how to empower an introverted child, and how companies can harness the natural talents of introverts. This extraordinary book has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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Penguin Australia

Two editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0670916765, 0141029196

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