HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Quiet : the power of introverts in a world…
Loading...

Quiet : the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking (edition 2012)

by Susan Cain

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,7582271,386 (4.04)223
Member:MaggieFlo
Title:Quiet : the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking
Authors:Susan Cain
Info:New York : Crown Publishers, c2012.
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:Introverts, extroverts, psychology, society, social media

Work details

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Recently added byjshrier, private library, ajp7, aeluhsuhn, NUScholars, David4953, waelrammo, LewCipher, amyblue
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 223 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 232 (next | show all)
Throughout history introverts have been treated as a lesser-than class. Introversion was seen as something to be overcome, not embraced. Susan dispels this worldview by showing how the world needs introverts. She plumbs the depths of what makes someone an introvert or an extrovert and discusses variations in these classifications. A wonderful read full of insight on what to do if you're an introvert and need to survive in an extrovert career, or if you're an introvert raising an extroverted child or vice versa. ( )
  catturtle | Aug 26, 2014 |
This book, although interesting, greatly irritated me. The Author was very one sided when it came to her arguments, usually using a quick blurb saying "extroverts are cool too". Every point she makes is strictly speaking to the introvert and not a person who exhibits both traits (which seems to me, the majority of the population).The idea of personality being either extrovert or introvert is a failure, just as someone isn't completely left or right brain dominant. The Author could have built more upon the benefits of introversion itself instead of creating arguments and statistics on whom wins in the race of life.

I'll admit, this was an audio book for me which could have played a part in my aversion to the Author. Sometimes when you listen to a book and the voice actor gets under your skin, this can be a death sign for the book itself. I've heard many people adore this book, so I won't say don't read it... It just wasn't my cup of tea. ( )
  yougotamber | Aug 22, 2014 |
I did feel at times that Cain associates quietness with introversion too much, in the sense that lots of introverts are very loud and talkative people (when talking about something relevant to them, that is, she did get it right that 'small talk' is not our forte), this is something I find rather confuses people, who, even knowing I hardly ever socialize, have a hard time believing I am really an introvert because I'm not shy. Ironically enough, I'm pretty sure the reason I get asked to please lower my voice pretty frequently is that I get so lost in what I'm excited about, I forget, not because I'm loud all the time. Anyway, I rather think the amount of quotes I've pulled speak for my high opinion of this book.

http://readingz.livejournal.com/339608.html ( )
  Evalangui | Aug 22, 2014 |
Susan Cain is a disillusioned Wall Street lawyer, now author, promoting her book. Publishing is an industry dominated by liberal thinkers. Is it small wonder that a book that demonizes Wall Street and other aggressive type industries/corporations would be championed by those same liberal devotees, thereby providing the book with wildly positive reviews, making it a best seller, while appealing to those of like minds? Susan Cain interviewed many introverts and did an enormous amount of research in preparation for the book, but most of us know that statistics can pretty well be manipulated to prove anything the researcher wishes. She shows her political stripes with the mention of three particular persons in her book, quoting them or acknowledging their superiority in some way, i.e., former Vice President Al Gore, Former President Bill Clinton and present President Barack Obama. I think I can reasonably draw the conclusion that since she chose to only use representatives from the Democrats, that she falls very comfortably into the category of those in the publishing industry who rarely, or barely, tolerate views from the right. Surely, there must be someone on the right side of the government who has said or done something she appreciated as much and could have included and quoted positively, but she chose not to do so.
Cain analyzed those in relationships with introverts, parents of an introvert, those who work with introverts, those married to introverts, Asians vs Americans, essentially, those whose own personalities were in conflict with the people with whom they were interacting. She also interviewed and drew conclusions about those married to or involved with someone with the same personality proclivity, introvert to introvert, extrovert to extrovert, etc. She chose anecdotal references to prove her specific points. The audio’s reader spoke in a confident, authoritative voice, making the listener believe the explanations offered were credible, although after exploring the comments from other introverts, some of their feelings would belie her results. It felt like even as she was apologizing and attempting to present extroverts and introverts equally, she seemed to be indicting extroverts as bullies and extolling introverts as compromisers contributing to the world more meaningfully. Extroverts were risk taking and warlike while introverts were peace-loving and docile. As she wrote, introverts were interested in substance and extroverts were interested in style. I am not sure that is a positive statement for both sides of the spectrum. It feels like a left-handed compliment. In my opinion, according to her theories, the introverts are the thinkers and everyone else is simply a noisemaker.
The book was not what I expected. I thought it would be more about the achievements of both introverts and extroverts rather than an explanation of how one betters the other, most of the time. I thought it would be about the appreciation of silence, at times, of living in a world without the silent scream of the social media scene, in which everyone is capable of excessively sharing! Basically, Cain, who is a person who prefers individuality and privacy, explored the workings of our world today which is governed by group think, open workspace and online sharing of all aspects of our lives. She cited many influential people, from all walks of life, past and present, as examples of introvert and extrovert behavior. Bill Gates, Albert Einstein, Rosa Parks, Tony Robbins, Dale Carnegie, Alfred Adler, Malcolm Gladwell, Pastor Rick Warren, Steve Wozniak, Warren Buffett, Ted Turner are only some of those mentioned.
Does she have the proper credentials to write a book offering and supporting theories that can’t really be proven? I had the feeling that she chose a premise before putting pen to paper, and then, she set about to prove it. Admittedly, she declares herself an introvert, so she might have put a thumb on the scale on her own behalf, since I thought that introverts came off far more positively, in the book, than extroverts, who were accused of being only the stimulus for innovations, while the introverts were the ones who thought more deliberately and made wiser, more thoughtful, and more often, correct decisions to carry out those innovations.
From the comments I read from other readers, who declared themselves introverts, I was not alone in my wariness about the book. Most people are all over the spectrum, with few being a pure introvert, extrovert or ambivert. The author declares that she is using the everyday spelling of extrovert, rather than the scientific, extravert, but then proceeds to present the book in a very cerebral way. Some of the studies she cites seem to be conclusive, but I feel certain there are others that declare the exact opposite and are also conclusive, but are not included. She infers that the old brain spurs us on, often to act foolishly, and it resides in the Limbic system and governs the extrovert. The new brain is in the Cortex and it is responsible for our sensible decisions; it governs the introvert. She talks about the amygdala and the frontal lobe and the cerebellum. These terms are not on the tips of most people’s tongues. She declares that there may be a genetic connection between dopamine and serotonin with dopamine leading to risk taking and serotonin to risk avoidance. Some of her theories seemed to simply be her own conjectures, some felt like they were made up out of whole cloth.
The book offers pat explanations about the difference between extroverts, introverts and everything in between. I felt that her conclusions were basically “one size might fit all”. Because the audio’s reader was excellent, the book was tolerable. Otherwise, I would have closed it and left it unread which is something I rarely do. However, the reader used just the right amount of expression and tone to make it a manageable experience and keep me involved until the end. ( )
  thewanderingjew | Aug 19, 2014 |
Well researched and written, Quiet is a book about the one-third to half of the population who’s introverted. Introversion and extroversion are two ends of a personality spectrum. Introverts tend to be quiet and introspective, and they need time to “recharge” after social situations. Extroverts, on the other hand, are gregarious and outgoing, and social interaction energizes them.

Quiet does a good job of debunking the myth that introversion means “anti-social.” Drawing upon research studies, personal experiences, and interviews, Cain shows how introverts benefit from social connections as much as extroverts, but prefer to interact with smaller groups of people and talk about weightier matters. It’s the quality, not the quantity, of the relationships that count.

Quiet is divided into four sections. The first is about extroversion being the current ideal in America and how many of our systems are set up to benefit and promote extroversion. For instance, the rise of the open floor plan office and the prominence of group work in schools.

The second section deals with the science behind the personality spectrum, how introverts and extroverts process dopamine differently, why both characteristics likely evolved, ect. I was particularly interested in how introverts are more sensitive to stimuli – what feels just right for an extrovert is an information overload for an introvert.

Section three is the shortest and looks at how introversion and extroversion vary between cultures, namely America and East Asia.

The last section is advice for living as an introvert and those living with introverts. The last chapter contains specific advice for parents and teachers of introverted children.

Throughout Quiet, Cain stresses that one type is not more beneficial than the other and that both have qualities that make them valuable. What is really needed is a greater cultural balance between the two, and for both types to be able to communicate with and understand the other.

I didn’t find any of the information mind blowing – I’d figured out that I was an introvert years ago, and I’ve already learned how to become what Cain calls a “pseudo-extrovert” when I need to be. However, Quiet was consistently informative and interesting, and I was glad that I’d read it. I would recommend it to any introvert interested in learning more about their personality or to someone who’s a parent or spouse of an introvert and wants to understand their loved one better. ( )
  pwaites | Aug 18, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 232 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Susan Cainprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Duffy, LauraCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fedor, AaronCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mazur, KatheNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prosperi, CarloTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reitsma, Jan WillemTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wallin, BitteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
A species in which everyone was General Patton would not succeed, any more than would a race in which everyone was Vincent van Gogh. I prefer to think that the planet needs athletes, philosophers, sex symbols, painters, scientists; it needs the warmhearted, the hardhearted, the coldhearted, and the weakhearted. It needs those who can devote their lives to studying how many droplets of water are secreted by the salivary glands of dogs under which circumstances, and it needs those who can capture the passing impression of cherry blossoms in a fourteen-syllable poem or devote twenty-five pages to the dissection of a small boy's feelings as he lies in bed in the dark waiting for his mother to kiss him good night. . . . Indeed the presence of outstanding strengths presupposes that energy needed in other areas has been channeled away from them.

- Allen Shawn
Dedication
To my childhood family
First words
Introduction
The North and South of Temperament
Montgomery, Alabama. December 1, 1955. Early evening. A public bus pulls to a stop and a sensibly dressed woman in her forties gets on. She carries herself erectly, despite having spent the day bent over an ironing board in a dingy basement tailor shop at the Montgomery Fair department store. Her feet are swollen, her shoulders ache. She sits in the first row of the Colored section and watches quietly as the bus fills with riders. Until the driver orders her to give her seat to a white person.
Quotations
To ask whether it's nature or nurture ... is like asking whether a blizzard is caused by temperature or humidity.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original language
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Book description
At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who invent and create but prefer not to pitch their own ideas; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled “quiet,” it is to introverts we owe many of the great contributions to society—from Van Gogh’s sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.

Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with the indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Susan Cain charts the rise of “the extrovert ideal” over the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects—how it helps to determine everything from how parishioners worship to who excels at Harvard Business School. And she draws on cutting-edge research on the biology and psychology of temperament to reveal how introverts can modulate their personalities according to circumstance, how to empower an introverted child, and how companies can harness the natural talents of introverts. This extraordinary book has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.
Haiku summary
Introverts are strong
their brains are just wired different
this can be a strength
(sullijo)

No descriptions found.

(see all 2 descriptions)

At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who invent and create but prefer not to pitch their own ideas; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts we owe many of the great contributions to society--from Van Gogh's sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer. Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with the indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Susan Cain charts the rise of "the extrovert ideal" over the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects--how it helps to determine everything from how parishioners worship to who excels at Harvard Business School. And she draws on cutting-edge research on the biology and psychology of temperament to reveal how introverts can modulate their personalities according to circumstance, how to empower an introverted child, and how companies can harness the natural talents of introverts. This extraordinary book has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1528 wanted4 pay6 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.04)
0.5
1 4
1.5 1
2 28
2.5 12
3 156
3.5 80
4 409
4.5 78
5 285

Audible.com

Two editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

Two editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0670916765, 0141029196

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alumn

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain was made available through LibraryThing Early Reviewers. Sign up to possibly get pre-publication copies of books.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,724,496 books! | Top bar: Always visible