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What the Great Ate: A Curious History of…

What the Great Ate: A Curious History of Food and Fame

by Matthew Jacob

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Food factoids, authenticated (or mostly so) by the authors, about rich, famous, infamous, and it's great fun just to skim through and then return. I'm personally quite taken with Patton's story of his grandmother's particularly delicious olives. Nothing strenuous, just a lot of fun. ( )
  Prop2gether | Jan 21, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307461955, Paperback)

What was eating them? And vice versa.
In What the Great Ate, Matthew and Mark Jacob have cooked up a bountiful sampling of the peculiar culinary likes, dislikes, habits, and attitudes of famous—and often notorious—figures throughout history. Here is food
• As code: Benito Mussolini used the phrase “we’re making spaghetti” to inform his wife if he’d be (illegally) dueling later that day.
• As superstition: Baseball star Wade Boggs credited his on-field success to eating chicken before nearly every game.
• In service to country: President Thomas Jefferson, America’s original foodie, introduced eggplant to the United States and wrote down the nation’s first recipe for ice cream.
From Emperor Nero to Bette Davis, Babe Ruth to Barack Obama, the bite-size tidbits in What the Great Ate will whet your appetite for tantalizing trivia.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:17 -0400)

A lighthearted pop history of the diets of celebrities and famous historical figures shares whimsical anecdotes, including Angelina Jolie's consumption of roaches and Lord Byron's vinegar weight-loss regime.

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