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The Moor's Last Sigh by Salman Rushdie
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The Moor's Last Sigh (original 1995; edition 2006)

by Salman Rushdie

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2,838232,051 (3.87)117
Member:PaulCranswick
Title:The Moor's Last Sigh
Authors:Salman Rushdie
Info:Vintage (2006), Edition: New edition, Paperback, 448 pages
Collections:Your library, Modern Fiction, To read
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The Moor's Last Sigh by Salman Rushdie (1995)

  1. 00
    Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie (wrmjr66)
    wrmjr66: I think The Moor's Last Sigh is Rushdie's best book since Midnight's Children.
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English (22)  Dutch (1)  English (23)
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
Not easy to read as the tricks that Rushdie provides in the language and the magical realistic form make it like a heavy but nutritious meal!
I read this before going to Kerala--Cochin in 2016 and it added a dimension that was welcome. ( )
  MarthaSpeirs | Nov 13, 2016 |
Everyone has their favorite Rushdie, and this was mine. It was also my first. Back then it dug deep, left me with vivid imageries of a marred and deceptive world of relationships recounted through the memories of a fabulously flawed and hapless narrator.
Every now and then I like to return to that time when magical realism was still left untouched, and I was still impressionable enough to be awed by Rushdie's lyrical mysticism. While tempted, I dare not read the book again. It just won't be the same. ( )
  perhapstoopink | Sep 25, 2016 |
Everyone has their favorite Rushdie, and this was mine. It was also my first. Back then it dug deep, left me with vivid imageries of a marred and deceptive world of relationships recounted through the memories of a fabulously flawed and hapless narrator.
Every now and then I like to return to that time when magical realism was still left untouched, and I was still impressionable enough to be awed by Rushdie's lyrical mysticism. While tempted, I dare not read the book again. It just won't be the same. ( )
  perhapstoopink | Sep 25, 2016 |
My first Rushdie - and what a book! The man gushes creativity!
The first half of the book is just about flawless - a wonderful family history of the most vivid characters - not all good or all bad, but good and bad in very believable ways; not constant, but very humanly inconsistent. And the story line woven from these characters is just as compelling as the characters themselves, with a weaving of the current characters into a backdrop of historical references.
The second half of the book isn't quite as good. The word play and flourishes become a little undergraduate - the Cashondeliveri family, and the four siblings named in accordance with eeny, meenie, mynie and mo. And the story line goes a little overboard - the Moor's life is lived at double speed - his bood is 40 years old when he turns 20; the patriarch extends his successful business career into drug smuggling and nuclear weapon proliferation.
But even with flaws this was a wonderful read.
Read March 2016 ( )
  mbmackay | Mar 12, 2016 |
The word play in this novel was so funny; I remember laughing out loud while reading in the bathtub. Some of the female characters were just delightful. ( )
  KathyGilbert | Jan 29, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
So, another brave and dazzling fable from Salman Rushdie, one that meets the test of civic usefulness -- broadly conceived -- as certainly as it fulfills the requirements of true art. No retort to tyranny could be more eloquent.
 
'Such surreal images, combined with the author's fecund language and slashing sleight of hand make it easy, in Mr. Rushdie's words, "not to feel preached at, to revel in the carnival without listening to the barker, to dance to the music" without seeming to hear the message in the glorious song.'
added by GYKM | editNew York Times, Michiko Kakutani (Dec 28, 1995)
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Salman Rushdieprimary authorall editionscalculated
Dabekaussen, EugèneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maters, TillyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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I have lost count of the days that have passed since I fled the horrors of Vasco Miranda's mad fortress in the Andalusian mountain-village of Benengeli; ran from death under cover of darkness and left a message nailed to the door.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0679744665, Paperback)

In The Moor's Last Sigh Salman Rushdie revisits some of the same ground he covered in his greatest novel, Midnight's Children. This book is narrated by Moraes Zogoiby, aka Moor, who speaks to us from a gravestone in Spain. Like Moor, Rushdie knows about a life spent in banishment from normal society--Rushdie because of the death sentence that followed The Satanic Verses, Moor because he ages at twice the rate of normal humans. Yet Moor's story of travail is bigger than Rushdie's; it encompasses a grand struggle between good and evil while Moor himself stands as allegory for Rushdie's home country of India. Filled with wordplay and ripe with humor, it is an epic work, and Rushdie has the tools to pull it off. He earned a 1995 Whitbread Prize for his efforts.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:21 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Winner of England's prestigious Whitbread Ward, Rushdie's first novel in seven years is a peppery melange of genres: a deliciously inventive family saga; a subversive alternate history of modern India; a fairy tale as inexhaustibly imagined as any in The Arabian Nights; and a book of ideas on topics from art to ethnicity, from religious fanaticism to the terrifying power of love.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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