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Four Blondes

by Candace Bushnell

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3253110,433 (2.41)37
FOUR BLONDES charts the romantic intrigues, liaisons, betrayals and victories of four modern women: a beautiful B-list model finagles rent-free summerhouses in the Hamptons from her lovers until she discovers she can get a man but can't get what she wants; a high-powered magazine columnist's floundering marriage to a literary journalist is thrown into crisis when her husband's career fails to live up to her expectations; a 'Cinderella' records her descent into paranoia in her journal as she realises she wants anybody's life except her own; an artist and aging 'It girl' - who fears that her time for finding a man has run out - travels to London in search of the kind of love and devotion she can't find in Manhattan... Studded with her trademark wit and stiletto-heel-sharp insight, FOUR BLONDES is dark, true, and compulsively readable.… (more)

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Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
Review: 4 Blonds by Candace Bushnell.

This is a book with four unrelated stories. The four women in the stories were all blond. That’s the only thing they had in common. Plus, every character in the book was a model, a writer, an actor, or a business person. I honestly didn’t care for the book but I read it to the end. I thought the stories didn’t have much humor if any at all. Let’s face it the book was boring. Yet, if you like women who carry around vials of cocaine like its normal and who are completely down to earth addicts then you will like the stories.

After reading the novel I don’t know how Candace Bushnell became a writer. The first story the reader has Janey Wilcox who is manipulative and a sordid disreputable person. who cares about no one but herself. Every summer she looks for a man who spends his summer in the Hamptons and she doesn’t even have to care about the man. It’s the luxury homes, free rent, food, spending sprees and expensive jewelry she is given to carry her through the winter and finds another man in the Hamptons summer after summer.

The second story is about a jealous New York journalist, Winnie Dieke who logs on to Amazon.com to read competitors work and reviews and smiles if their rates are low. Winnie hates everything and everyone. She believes she is the greatest journalist and her husband is a journalist and her being the best is a secret to him. Winnie isn’t scared of anything. When she has an impossible deadline or can’t get people to cooperate on interviews, or doesn’t think she’s getting the assignments she wants she gets over angry. She calls people and screams, sends e-mail’s of her unhappiness or marches into her editor’s offices and has a hissy fit until she gets what she wants.

Then we have the story of a social climber who pretends to be sleeping and waits until her husband goes into the bathroom and she slips out of bed and runs to her secret stash and snorts a large line of cocaine. She thinks she’s a beauty princess but turns into a disillusioned, pill-popping addict. Her hilarious misadventures are managed by a gloating jubilant feeling in staccato prose which is described by her gay friend.

The last story isn’t even good enough to mention. I’ll say this; somehow Blonds have more fun… Candace Bushnell writes about shallow blond women who are self-absorbed in Ney York that think about nothing but sex, money, and designer clothes… ( )
  Juan-banjo | Jan 16, 2017 |
Also reviewed here: http://porcelainulairi.wordpress.com/2011/08/21/4-blondes-gave-me-4-headaches/

Four Blondes by Candace Bushnell was one of the worst books I have ever read, and I have read some bad ones recently. I had an idea to start taking a lot of notes when I read, since I thought it would help with my reviews. But in the case of this book, I found myself just writing spiteful and angry comments, since I am not sure it warrants such a thoughtful analysis. This is my full review.

The book is about four women in New York City. They do not intermingle, nor do I think they even know each other, and each woman gets her own section. I think it would be best for me to break down each woman’s story to get a better understanding of the whole thing. There might be what some would consider “spoilers,” but I doubt anyone would read this book after my review or seeing other reviews online.

-Spoilers below-

The first story, entitled “Nice N’Easy,” is about Janey Wilcox, a model and former movie star (one B-rated movie). The main plot is that she needs to find a man to stay with for the summer in the Hamptons. She is narcissistic, selfish, quite stupid, and by all means a prostitute. She is obsessed with others’ looks, even her own family, and despises her sister who has actually made something of her life. In fact, I think the story of her sister would have been far more interesting. Janey is proud that she has to rely on others to get by, particularly men. When things start to go bad for her, I find I do not sympathize or pity her, like I would any other heroine. In fact, I am kind of angry in the end when things go well.

The second story, called “Highlights (For Adults),” is about Winnie. Well, actually, it is more about her tortured husband James. I say tortured because Winnie is kind of a bitch. The beginning of the story starts out telling us how great they are together because they “hate” the same things, and then goes on for two pages about things they hate (which they turn out being hypocritical about). Winnie wants success for James, but really only so she can ride his coattails, which in fact is what she did by marrying him (they are both journalists). It ends up that they hate each other, but they are both fearful to leave. In the end, they both have an affair, making Winnie happier, and James more scared (that Winnie will find out). Such a nice ending, don’t you think?

Princess Cecelia is the third story, “Platinum.” She is neurotic and paranoid. She snagged a prince, who for whatever reason works as an executive at a T.V. show, but she is very unhappy. She thinks someone is poisoning her, but really she is just taking a lot of pills. She is horrible to her husband and ends up making friends with another star, famous for killing her husband, and goes off on a wild drinking/coke binge. Her husband is cold, but when she goes into an episode, I feel more sympathy for him than I do for her.

The last story is incredibly short, “Single Process.” The woman telling it does not give her name, but she is a writer who is given an assignment to go to England and find out about sex. The story is mostly about how the English hate sex, how they are bad at it , etc. It seems more like one long joke on the English than it does about the writer. She claims she “fell in love” with an Englishman after a few days, but when her assignment is over, she meets someone on a plane and moves on within hours. I ended this story thinking it was supposed to be Carrie from Sex and the City.

I can honestly say that I despised every character in this book, possibly aside from the writer, but her story was so short it was hard to tell. I know this is just chick lit, but it is poorly written chick lit. A character should be someone we are interested in, whether we care about them or hate them, we WANT to know what will happen to them. Maybe it’s even someone we relate to. Either way, we have a vested interest. I had none of that with this book. There were also times that I became frustrated with Bushnell’s writing style. The conversations were often clunky or awkward, and during Winnie and James’ section, every other sentence was a parenthesized remark (kind of like how my paragraph about them went).

I think it is clear from my statements above that I do not recommend this book, not even for a fun summer read at the beach. There are many more novels out there that can give you simple enjoyment, but without being trashy. ( )
  Ulairi | Jun 16, 2016 |
Four stories about fairly unlikable, unsympathetic women and their lives. We follow their angst until they finally get to their "over the rainbow." I'm sorry, I just didn't get in to this one. ( )
  wareagle78 | Feb 2, 2014 |
This book contains 4 stories. I started with the first and hoped it would get better. To my surprise the stories were all separate not linked and when I started to read story 2 I realized how awful this book is. Very badly written. No point whatsoever. Waste of time. ( )
  Marlene-NL | Apr 12, 2013 |
This is typical Bushnell writing. I love her chick lit ( )
  busymombookclub | Jun 9, 2010 |
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FOUR BLONDES charts the romantic intrigues, liaisons, betrayals and victories of four modern women: a beautiful B-list model finagles rent-free summerhouses in the Hamptons from her lovers until she discovers she can get a man but can't get what she wants; a high-powered magazine columnist's floundering marriage to a literary journalist is thrown into crisis when her husband's career fails to live up to her expectations; a 'Cinderella' records her descent into paranoia in her journal as she realises she wants anybody's life except her own; an artist and aging 'It girl' - who fears that her time for finding a man has run out - travels to London in search of the kind of love and devotion she can't find in Manhattan... Studded with her trademark wit and stiletto-heel-sharp insight, FOUR BLONDES is dark, true, and compulsively readable.

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