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King Lear by William Shakespeare
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King Lear (1606)

by William Shakespeare

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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10,97399356 (4.07)491
  1. 90
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  2. 92
    A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley (browner56)
    browner56: The original and a modern retelling of a powerful story involving some very strong women
  3. 10
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  4. 32
    Titus Andronicus by William Shakespeare (chrisharpe)
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    Hamlet by William Shakespeare (kara.shamy)
  6. 04
    Now, Voyager [1942 film] by Irving Rapper (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: King Lear could be successfully paired with the film adaptation of Now Voyager by Irving Rapper
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» See also 491 mentions

English (92)  French (2)  Russian (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (98)
Showing 1-5 of 92 (next | show all)
The illustrations are unremarkable. ( )
  deckla | Jul 16, 2018 |
I can clearly see why King Lear was so highly recommended to me. Shakespeare really has worked the action and reaction throughout the piece. We have hope and follow with despair. One thing happens and he feeds it with a reaction that puts you on the edge of your seat or leaves you laughing. I fell in love with the Fool and only wish that there was more of him. Also, I wish that the deaths of Cordelia and Gloucester were shown instead of being narrated. ( )
  Katrinia17 | Dec 30, 2017 |
my first foray into the world of Shakespeare, grade 10 English class - changed my life - saw it at Stratford Festival shortly thereafter and it knocked my socks off - led to lifelong yearning for more of the same
  frahealee | Dec 3, 2017 |
At the risk of sounding flippant, I realized that there are two productions of King Lear that need to be done: one set in the Klingon Empire, and the other performed by Monty Python. Go ahead, I dare you, read Poor Tom's lines like Eric Idle and try not to laugh! ( )
  Scott_Hercher | Nov 25, 2017 |
The play begins with Lear relinquishing his crown, resigning from his position as ruler, and dividing up his kingdom between his three daughters; in other words, the play begins with the title character’s retirement. Although Lear seeks to ‘unburden’ himself of responsibility through this act, it leaves him uncertain of his place and identity. He wants to ‘retain/ The name, and all th’additions to a king’, but as he quickly discovers, this is easier said than done. Lear finds himself suddenly powerless, at the mercy of his cruel daughters Goneril and Regan. He travels between them, dependent upon them for food and shelter, until he is eventually forced out into the rain, weathering a terrible storm on a bare heath because his daughters will not let him keep his train of knights.

As well as charting the aftermath of Lear’s retirement, King Lear also explores the character’s mental and emotional instability. Throughout the play, Lear fluctuates between extreme anger and childish vulnerability; as Goneril comments to her sister Regan, ‘You see how full of changes his age is’. In the very opening scene, Lear demonstrates his irrational rage by banishing his youngest daughter, Cordelia, because she refuses to elaborate her filial affection in exchange for a portion of the kingdom. Following his night on the heath, meanwhile, Lear’s vulnerability is touchingly apparent, as he awakens in Cordelia’s care confused and afraid, seeking forgiveness, reassurance and support from his loving daughter. King Lear tells the story of a disintegrating identity, and of a man who fears he is going mad: ‘Who is it that can tell me who I am?’ he asks at one point in the play, later adding ‘O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven!’.

King Lear is such a powerful play on so many levels - it explores all the negative relationships we humans experience and exposes them in a very raw way - from jealousy, cruelty and hatred through abandonment, loss and desolation leading to ultimately a loss of what makes us human. Lear's journey can be seen as an illustration of what it is like to lose all mentally and spiritually and physically and makes one wonder what Shakespeare had seen and endured to tap into in such depth the human condition.
( )
2 vote AntonioGallo | Nov 2, 2017 |
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» Add other authors (156 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shakespeare, Williamprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baudissin, Wolf Heinrich GrafTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brissaud, PierreIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brooke, C. F. TuckerEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buck, Philo M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eccles, MarkEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Foakes, R. A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Günther, FrankTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hallqvist, Britt G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harbage, AlfredEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harrison, G. B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jylhä, YrjöTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellogg, BrainerdEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kittredge, George LymanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lamar, Virginia A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mowat, Barbara A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muir, KennethEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Noguchi, IsamuIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Orgel, StephenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Radspieler, HansEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ribner, IrvingEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ridley, M. R.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, William J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ryan, KiernanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weis, RenéEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werstine, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wieland, Christoph MartinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wolfit, DonaldIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Ran (1985IMDb)
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
I thought the king had more affected the Duke of Albany than Cornwall.
Quotations
Although the last, not least.
Nothing will come of nothing.
How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is

To have a thankless child!
Oh, that way madness lies; let me shun that.
The worst is not

So long as we can say, "This is the worst."
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This entry is for the complete King Lear only. Do not combine it with abridgements, simplified adaptations or modernizations, Cliffs Notes or similar, or videorecordings of performances, and please separate any that are here.

It should go without saying that this work should also not be combined with any other plays or combinations of plays, or any of its many adaptations (audio, video, reworking, etc.).
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Hinn aldurhnigni konungur Lér hefur ákveðið að skipta konungsríki sínu á milli dætra sinna þriggja, og skal hlutur hverrar dóttur fara eftir því hvað ást hennar á honum er mikil. En hvað vottar skýrast um ást barna til foreldra? Auðsveipni og fagurgali eldri systranna tveggja eða sjálfstæði og hreinskilni Kordelíu þeirrar yngstu? Æfur af reiði yfir því sem Lér telur skort á ást, afneitar hann Kordelíu og skiptir ríkinu í tvennt á milli eldri systranna. Í hönd fara tímar grimmúðlegrar valdabaráttu, svikráða og upplausnar og það líður ekki á löngu þar til eldri systurnar hafa hrakið föður sinn á burt.Meistaraverk Shakespeares veitir einstaka innsýn í heim hinna valdaþyrstu, blekkingar þeirra og klæki. Tímalaust listaverk fullt af visku um átök kynslóðanna, drambið, blinduna, brjálsemina og það að missa allt. Lér konungur er kynngimagnað og stórbrotið leikrit, einn frægasti harmleikur  Shakespeares. Verkið á erindi við fólk á öllum tímum og er sviðsett í leikhúsum um víða veröld á ári hverju.Hér er á ferð ný þýðing Þórarins Eldjárns á þessu sígilda meistaraverki sem gerð er í tilefni af uppsetningu Þjóðleikhússins á verkinu leikárið 2010-2011.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 074348276X, Mass Market Paperback)

Folger Shakespeare Library

The world's leading center for Shakespeare studies

Each edition includes:

• Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• Scene-by-scene plot summaries

• A key to famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare's language

• An essay by an outstanding scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library's vast holdings of rare books

Essay by Susan Snyder

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare's printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:02 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

An ageing king makes a capricious decision to divide his realm among his three daughters according to the love they express for him. When the youngest daughter refuses to take part in this charade, she is banished, leaving the king dependent on her manipulative and untrustworthy sisters.… (more)

» see all 48 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140714766, 0141012293

Yale University Press

An edition of this book was published by Yale University Press.

» Publisher information page

Sourcebooks MediaFusion

An edition of this book was published by Sourcebooks MediaFusion.

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Recorded Books

2 editions of this book were published by Recorded Books.

Editions: 1456104691, 144987682X

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