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King Lear by William Shakespeare
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King Lear (edition 2001)

by William Shakespeare

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9,00577332 (4.08)368
Member:dylanwolf
Title:King Lear
Authors:William Shakespeare
Info:Penguin Books Ltd (2001), Paperback
Collections:Shakespeare
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Tags:Shakespeare

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King Lear by William Shakespeare

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» See also 368 mentions

English (73)  Russian (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  All languages (77)
Showing 1-5 of 73 (next | show all)
Having finally gotten around to reading the last of Shakespeare's major tragedies I'm pleased to find that King Lear (a conflated text) doesn't disappoint. Certainly one of the more complex Shakespeare plays, both in the thematic complexity and the morality of the actions portrayed (though for moral complexity I think that Coriolanus has this one beat).

The play raises many questions to ponder: the relationship between overthrown beliefs, despair, and madness throughout the play. Whether a king, even if he had far fewer flaws than Lear, could ever happily retire after dividing his kingdom- a monarchy brooks no second king. Whether Cordelia, despite her virtue, would actually have made a good queen given her unwillingness to play the game of court. Whether the king of France married Cordelia so as to have a pretext for a war of conquest once her birthright was denied. Atop all else, the question remains whether Lear was ill treated by the play, or got what he deserved for being a poor king, a poor father, and a poor man in general.

All these questions, combined with the multiple plot threads running throughout the play and the brilliant details that Shakespeare drops throughout (Gloucester going from figuratively blind to literally blind, Lear and Edmund being inverse reflections of each other in many cases, love driving Goneril and Regan to their deaths when lack of love caused them to sin against their father, etc.) mean that there are surely many satisfying ways to stage King Lear. In particular, a performance could vary significantly in the amount of sympathy King Lear himself evokes, and anywhere in the spectrum could make for an interesting production.

Next time King Lear is being performed near me I'll be sure to check it out, it deserves its reputation as one of the greatest plays of the most influential playwright of all time.
  BayardUS | Dec 10, 2014 |
Vain and silly King Lear demands that each of his three daughters describe their love for him. When the youngest and favored Cordelia gives a reply that is less gushing, but more reasonable, than her sisters, the King banishes her. This sets up a chain of miserable events in which the sisters and their husbands scramble to replace Cordelia in their father's heart, but fail because ambition brings out their cruelty. ( )
1 vote mstrust | Nov 8, 2014 |
My survey of the canon in order to better understand Simpsons references continues.

I am drawn for obvious reasons to representations of madness in literature and Edgar/Tom O'Bedlam is perhaps my all-time favourite. This cold night will turn us all to fools and madmen...
  lawrenh | Oct 27, 2014 |
My survey of the canon in order to better understand Simpsons references continues.

I am drawn for obvious reasons to representations of madness in literature and Edgar/Tom O'Bedlam is perhaps my all-time favourite. This cold night will turn us all to fools and madmen...
  lawrenh | Oct 27, 2014 |
Probably the best of Shakespeare's works thematically, but not the easiest to follow. The sub-plots, the various intrigues, makes for a very convoluted plot. Some great roles though -- Lear, Edgar playing a madman, the Fool, the evil Edmund and the scheming daughters ... some serious scene-stealing material. ( )
  AliceAnna | Oct 21, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (227 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shakespeare, Williamprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brissaud, PierreIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brooke, C. F. TuckerEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buck, Philo M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Foakes, R.A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Günther, FrankTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hallqvist, Britt G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harbage, AlfredEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harrison, G. B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellogg, BrainerdEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kittredge, George LymanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lamar, Virginia A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mowat, Barbara A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muir, KennethEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Noguchi, IsamuIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Orgel, StephenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Radspieler, HansEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ribner, IrvingEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ridley, M. R.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weis, RenéEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werstine, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wieland, Christoph Martin.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wolfit, DonaldIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Ran (1985IMDb)
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
I thought the king had more affected the Duke of Albany than Cornwall.
Quotations
Although the last, not least.
Nothing will come of nothing.
How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is

To have a thankless child!
Oh, that way madness lies; let me shun that.
The worst is not

So long as we can say, "This is the worst."
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This entry is for the COMPLETE "King Lear" only. Do not combine it with abridgements, simplified adaptations or modernizations, Cliffs Notes or similar, or videorecordings of performances, and please separate any that are here.

It should go without saying that this work should also not be combined with any other plays or combinations of plays.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Hinn aldurhnigni konungur Lér hefur ákveðið að skipta konungsríki sínu á milli dætra sinna þriggja, og skal hlutur hverrar dóttur fara eftir því hvað ást hennar á honum er mikil. En hvað vottar skýrast um ást barna til foreldra? Auðsveipni og fagurgali eldri systranna tveggja eða sjálfstæði og hreinskilni Kordelíu þeirrar yngstu? Æfur af reiði yfir því sem Lér telur skort á ást, afneitar hann Kordelíu og skiptir ríkinu í tvennt á milli eldri systranna. Í hönd fara tímar grimmúðlegrar valdabaráttu, svikráða og upplausnar og það líður ekki á löngu þar til eldri systurnar hafa hrakið föður sinn á burt.Meistaraverk Shakespeares veitir einstaka innsýn í heim hinna valdaþyrstu, blekkingar þeirra og klæki. Tímalaust listaverk fullt af visku um átök kynslóðanna, drambið, blinduna, brjálsemina og það að missa allt. Lér konungur er kynngimagnað og stórbrotið leikrit, einn frægasti harmleikur  Shakespeares. Verkið á erindi við fólk á öllum tímum og er sviðsett í leikhúsum um víða veröld á ári hverju.Hér er á ferð ný þýðing Þórarins Eldjárns á þessu sígilda meistaraverki sem gerð er í tilefni af uppsetningu Þjóðleikhússins á verkinu leikárið 2010-2011.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 074348276X, Mass Market Paperback)

Folger Shakespeare Library

The world's leading center for Shakespeare studies

Each edition includes:

• Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• Scene-by-scene plot summaries

• A key to famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare's language

• An essay by an outstanding scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library's vast holdings of rare books

Essay by Susan Snyder

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare's printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:42:25 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

An ageing king makes a capricious decision to divide his realm among his three daughters according to the love they express for him. When the youngest daughter refuses to take part in this charade, she is banished, leaving the king dependent on her manipulative and untrustworthy sisters.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 29 descriptions

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Audible.com

7 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140714766, 0141012293

Beacon Press

An edition of this book was published by Beacon Press.

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Yale University Press

An edition of this book was published by Yale University Press.

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2 editions of this book were published by Recorded Books.

Editions: 1456104691, 144987682X

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