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Twelfth Night (Shakespeare, Signet Classic) (edition 1965)

by William Shakespeare

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Title:Twelfth Night (Shakespeare, Signet Classic)
Authors:William Shakespeare
Info:Signet Classics (1965), Paperback
Collections:Your library, Currently reading
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Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare

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English (63)  Swedish (1)  French (1)  German (1)  All (66)
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
Well, I finally finished it. Once I started, I was determined to read it all, but it was hard to enjoy it. Not Shakespeare's best comedy.
I wonder if it would have been better if I had used a version with notes. Or read the Manga version. Having just checked out Wikipedia, I conclude that it would be a good thing to do this before the next time I read Shakespeare, especially if the play is not already familiar to me.

The edition I read was one of the Great Books, which has 2 volumes covering all of Shakespeare's plays and sonnets. ( )
  CarolJMO | Dec 12, 2016 |
My favorite of Shakespeare's comedies. NO idea why. Like, none. Not a clue. But I LOVE IT! As in, I have read it countless times, and I own the movie version with Helena Bonam Carter which I've watched dozens of times. So random. ( )
  GoldenDarter | Sep 15, 2016 |
Reading a play is always a little slow at first, since there aren't the character descriptions or scenery or background that a novel would have, but I grew to like this story, and was much helped by the translation footnotes. I feel bad for Malvolio - what a mean trick... ( )
  Darth-Heather | May 31, 2016 |
Director's version with suggested set, costumes, direction
  MarleneMacke | Apr 3, 2016 |
Audio performed by Stella Gonet, Gerard Murphy and a full cast

Viola and her twin brother, Sebastian, are separated during a shipwreck. When she arrives on the shores of Illyria, she presumes Sebastian is dead. The ship’s captain helps her disguise herself as a man, and she enters the service of Duke Orsino, with whom she falls in love. Orsino, however, loves the Countess Olivia, who has foresworn any suitors while she mourns the death of her father and brother. Orsino begs Cesario (Viola in disguise) to plead his case with Olivia, but Olivia instead falls in love with Cesario. And so the fun begins.

I love Shakespeare, and I confess to liking his comedies more than the tragedies or historical dramas. I find it particularly delightful to watch the various mistaken identities, convoluted twists and turns in plot, purposeful obfuscations or pranks, and dawning realizations unfold before my eyes. The scenarios are outlandish and ridiculous to a modern audience, but are still fun and delightful in their execution.

BUT … I dislike reading plays. I much prefer to see them performed. When I’m reading – especially Shakespeare – I find that I lose the sense of action and can more easily get bogged down in unfamiliar terms or phrases. Listening to this audio performance was a happy compromise. I’ve seen this play on stage and could easily picture the scenarios and shenanigans while listening to this very talented cast audio performance.

I did also have a text version to supplement the audio experience, and the particular edition I had (Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-953609-2) includes a long introduction outlining the history of this work, copious footnotes in the play defining terms, an appendix with the music, and an extensive index. It is an edition I would definitely recommend to someone who is studying this play.
( )
  BookConcierge | Jan 13, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
Having read this I believed it was rather enlightening. I appreciate you spending some time and
 

» Add other authors (150 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shakespeare, Williamprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Andrews, John F.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Auld, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Barnet, SylvanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duff, Anne-MarieNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Elam, KeirEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Furness, Horace HowardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Günther, FrankTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harrison, G. B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holden, William P.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Honigmann, E. A. J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hudson, Henry N.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hulme, A. M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Innes, Arthur D.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kittredge, George LymanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Komrij, GerritTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maloney, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McCowen, AlecForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mowat, Barbara A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, William JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schlegel, August Wilhelm vonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simon, JosetteNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werstine, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wood, StanleyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
If music be the food of love, play on,

Give me excess of it; that, surfeiting,

The appetite may sicken, and so die.
Feste the Clown: Come away, come away, death,
And in sad cypress let me be laid;
Fly away, fl y away, breath;
I am slain by a fair cruel maid.
My shroud of white, stuck all with yew,
O, prepare it!
My part of death, no one so true
Did share it.
Quotations
If music be the food of love, play on;
Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.

That strain again! it had a dying fall:
O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet sound
That breathes upon a bank of violets,
Stealing and giving odour!
what says Quinapalus?
“Better a witty fool, than a foolish wit.”
If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.
Be not afraid of greatness: some men are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon them.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work is for the COMPLETE "Twelfth Night" ONLY. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or "simplifications" (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.

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Wikipedia in English (6)

Book description
Viola is shipwrecked and dons male clothing to get a job. Cesario (Viola) is sent by Duke Orsino to woo for him the Lady Olivia; Olivia, however, is more interested, and falls in love with Cesario (Viola). (Subplot: Olivia's uncle Toby Belch and cohorts scheme to trick Malvolio into thinking that Olivia favors him.) Meanwhile, Viola's twin brother, thought to be lost at sea, emerges and is swept into marriage with Olivia — and the masquerade is over, to most people's advantage.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743482778, Mass Market Paperback)

Each edition includes:

• Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• Scene-by-scene plot summaries

• A key to famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare's language

• An essay by an outstanding scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library's vast holdings of rare books

Essay by Catherine Belsey

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., is home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare's printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs. For more information, visit www.folger.edu.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:34 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Shakespeare's Twelfth Night presented in a Manga style.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 20 descriptions

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Audible.com

15 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140714898, 0141014709

Yale University Press

An edition of this book was published by Yale University Press.

» Publisher information page

Recorded Books

2 editions of this book were published by Recorded Books.

Editions: 1456100033, 1449889646

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