HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of…
Loading...

On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy (1961)

by Carl R. Rogers

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
90959,684 (4.11)5

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
This book is quite possibly the best book that I have read as a part of my graduate school experience thus far.

This is the third theory book that I have read (Skinner, Jung) and Rogers is the most easy to get along with and understand. Rogers is humble, and every step of the way takes you along his journey to how he developed person centered therapy. At no point does he insist that his theory is the right one, or the only, but he says that his theory is what he has developed from his own experiences.

I would definitely recommend!! ( )
1 vote csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
This book is quite possibly the best book that I have read as a part of my graduate school experience thus far.

This is the third theory book that I have read (Skinner, Jung) and Rogers is the most easy to get along with and understand. Rogers is humble, and every step of the way takes you along his journey to how he developed person centered therapy. At no point does he insist that his theory is the right one, or the only, but he says that his theory is what he has developed from his own experiences.

I would definitely recommend!! ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
Although this isn't saying much by itself in my opinion, Rogers is certainly better than Freud, (and Skinner seems pretty heartless and mechanical too)-- more human, less arrogant and hung-up on himself......

Also, although again this isn't saying much in itself, he writes better prose than Jung; it is nice to read someone who can write readable English.....

And a bright humanist faith illuminates the work throughout.

.....................

Now, I suppose that the most relevant criticism of his thought would be from the tension between authenticity-- *"In my relationships with persons I have found that it does not help, in the long run, to act as though I were something I am not*. It does not help to act calm and pleasant when actually I am angry and critical.... I have not found it to be helpful or effective in my relationships with other people to maintain a façade; to act in one way on the surface when I am experiencing something quite different underneath."-- and unconditional positive regard for all persons.

Probably much of the same criticism and ill feeling directed at Carl Rogers has also been directed at Jane Bennet and all like her-- "Do clear *them* too, or we shall be obliged to think ill of somebody", her younger sister sneered at her. In other words, if you think well of *everyone*, then you must just not be very serious at all.

And perhaps the criticism is not without some teeth. If we think well of Rogers, or Jane, then we do aspire to love all people, to be sincere and even pacifistic in nature towards everyone. But then our ire is naturally and automatically aroused when we meet the rogue and the fighter, (the Wickham), and then it seems for a time difficult if not impossible to write a story without villains-- as if we could expel someone from the family of humanity as though from a school.... as though we could write a story in which only some of the characters are humans, and the rest are ogres and trolls.

But if we like how we are treated by the Rogerses and the Janes of the world, then perhaps there is something to how they think.

Often what Rogers writes does not appear usually to be exceptional to me, but he is reasonable, and his very reasonableness can be charming. Likewise, there is nothing new about the idea that love is the answer, but if that is true, then that is more than enough to recommend it.

It's easy enough to roll off Rogers' Big Three Qualifications for good therapy: authenticity, unconditional positive regard, and empathy-- which I suppose is a sort of love, although clearly of a certain kind, and not the only kind-- but clearly alot of thought went into the writing of these rather readable words.

.... I wouldn't say that it is merely a matter of behavior, although behavior is the fruit, but there is more than simply acting as if you really did have an unconditional positive regard for someone if you really don't, and simply hoping as though the salutary effects of positive action would change your feelings.... You could do worse than this, but simply faking positive feelings would violate the sense of genuineness that we all desire to receive, and so ought to strive to provide.

{Better than just hoping is to have a real genuine, shining humanist faith, that there really is a way to have unconditional positive regard for all those whom you meet.... that there really is a way to have a story without villains....}

But if you can really have empathy for the person-- if you can feel about them the way that you might feel about yourself, despite all the differences.... if you can love that other person, the way that Jane loved Darcy when he seemed like he was a fool at best, by really feeling for him.... and not just loving Charles because they were both such easily-lovable people.....

The thing is, that despite the rather utilitarian prose of Rogers, he is really writing about love.

(9/10) ( )
  fearless2012 | May 8, 2014 |
Counselling
  Nicktee1949 | Mar 28, 2007 |
Carl Rogers, founder of the humanistic psychology movement, introduced the idea of “client-centered therapy.” A new introduction by Peter Kramer sheds light on the significance of Rogers’s work today. New discoveries in the field of psychopharmacology, especially that of the antidepressant Prozac, have spawned a quick-fix drug revolution that has obscured the psychotherapeutic relationship. As the pendulum slowly swings back toward an appreciation of the therapeutic encounter, Dr. Rogers’s “client-centered therapy” becomes particularly timely and important.

There аre importаnt pаrаllels between Cаrl Rogers аnd Rаlph Wаldo Emerson. This mаkes Rogers' philosophy аnd psychotherаpeutic аpproаch one thаt plаces the individuаl in the supreme seаt of ultimаte аuthority over his/her own experience аnd existence. The mаin messаge thаt Rogers develops from mаny different аngles is this one: there is no beаst in mаn, аnd therefore there is аlso no need to feаr one's innermost thoughts, feelings, longings аnd desires. Rogers sees humаn beings аs cаpаble of vаst growth аnd creаtivity; аble to аchieve ethicаl аnd loving relаtionships аnd encounters; аnd аchieving а heаled аnd heаlthy soul thаt directs us towаrd others аnd the world. He explаins the method he developed thаt seeks to fаcilitаte personаl growth. The method is not intrusive but fаciliаtes the nаturаl growth process of the client rаther thаn tаkes on the world-view or pаrаdigm of the therаpist.

However, as always, this psychological theory and practice has drawbacks, not the least of which is Roger's blindness to the destructive aspects of individuals, cultures and societies.
1 vote antimuzak | Nov 2, 2006 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 039575531X, Paperback)

The late Carl Rogers, founder of the humanistic psychology movement, revolutionized psychotherapy with his concept of "client-centered therapy." His influence has spanned decades, but that influence has become so much a part of mainstream psychology that the ingenious nature of his work has almost been forgotten. A new introduction by Peter Kramer sheds light on the significance of Dr. Rogers's work today. New discoveries in the field of psychopharmacology, especially that of the antidepressant Prozac, have spawned a quick-fix drug revolution that has obscured the psychotherapeutic relationship. As the pendulum slowly swings back toward an appreciation of the therapeutic encounter, Dr. Rogers's "client-centered therapy" becomes particularly timely and important.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:52 -0400)

Collection of essays by American psychotherapist Carl Rogers written between 1951 and 1961, in which he put forth his ideas about self-esteem, flexibility, respect for self, and acceptance of others.

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
47 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.11)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 2
2.5 1
3 14
3.5 1
4 31
4.5 2
5 34

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 118,502,709 books! | Top bar: Always visible